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Letter from Kansas City Court of Appeals judge, Ewing C. Bland, to his uncle, Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on January 16, 1918. Bland recommends against using Joe Shannon to use for political influence and instead suggests Mike Casey, an attorney with close ties to Tom Pendergast.

Date: 
January 16th 1918

Letter from Kansas City Court of Appeals judge, Ewing C. Bland, to his uncle, Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on December 11, 1920. Bland inquires if Sanford Madden should continue his campaign for marshal since he does not have the support of all Kansas City political factions.

Date: 
December 11th 1920

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to his nephew, Kansas City Court of Appeals Judge Ewing C. Bland, on December 31, 1920. Mitchell comments that Sanford Madden should not the support of all Kansas City political factions in order to be a strong candidate for marshal. Mitchell contends that Thomas J. Pendergast's endorsement is not needed if Madden has the support of James A. Reed and Judge Miles Bulger.

Date: 
December 31st 1920

Letter from Kansas City Court of Appeals judge, Ewing C. Bland, to his uncle on April 19, 1921. Bland comments in relation to his own political campaign that, "The Pendergast faction now seems the strongest and could no doubt control any delegation from this county."

Date: 
April 19th 1921

Letter from Kansas City Court of Appeals judge, Ewing C. Bland, to his uncle on January 13, 1933. Bland provides his analysis of the Missouri political landscape as Mitchell attempts seek political support in a campaign for office.

Date: 
January 13th 1933

Letter from Richard Perry Spencer to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on February 1, 1932. Spencer believes that every Pendergast-endorsed candidate should be defeated in the upcoming primary. Otherwise, a precedent might form where candidates spend more time vying for the support of Pendergast than the support of the people.

Date: 
February 1st 1932

Letter from Frank P. Walsh, attorney and counselor at law, to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on February 20, 1932. Walsh discusses Pendergast's patronage concerning Mitchell's and Franklin D. Roosevelt's individual campaigns.

Date: 
February 20th 1932

Letter from H. B. Blair to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in early 1932. Blair admits that he will support Charles Hay and Dearmont if they start an anti-Pendergast movement, saying that as a Democrat he would rather have a Republican Missouri than one controlled by boss rule.

Date: 
1932

Telegram from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to his nephew, Kansas City Court of Appeals judge, Ewing C. Bland, on March 24, 1932. Mitchell requests that Bland meet with Judge Cas Welch and Jim Aylward on Mitchell's behalf.

Date: 
March 24th 1932

Telegram from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to judge Casmir J. Welch on March 24, 1932. Mitchell encourages Cas Welch's support of Franklin D. Roosevelt for President.

Date: 
March 24th 1932

Letter from Kansas City Court of Appeals judge, Ewing C. Bland, to his uncle, Ewing Young, Mitchell, Jr. on March 27, 1932. Bland updates Mitchell on his meeting with James P. Aylward and recounts the individual opinions of Aylward, Thomas J. Pendergast and Cas Welch of Franklin D. Roosevelt as the Democratic nominee for President.

Date: 
March 27th 1932

Letter from George G. Vest, attorney and counselor at law, to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on May 10, 1932. Vest comments that Thomas J. Pendergast's personal physician, Dr. D. M. Nigro, would speak with Pendergast on Vest's behalf. He also discusses Franklin D. Roosevelt's Presidential primary campaign.

Date: 
May 10th 1932

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Hon. Jerome Walsh on May 11, 1932. Mitchell inquires what intention Thomas J. Pendergast and James A. Reed might have during their trip to Chicago.

Date: 
May 11th 1932

Letter from Barney E. Reilly to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on May 13, 1932. Reilly discusses Franklin D. Roosevelt's primary campaign as it relates to Kansas City and northwestern Missouri politics.

Date: 
May 13th 1932

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to George G. Vest on May 21, 1932. Vest informs Mitchell that C. W. Greenwade will tell Pendergast that he fully supports Mitchell as a candidate for Congress. Vest advises Mitchell to get other colleagues to pressure Pendergast into supporting him, as Vest believes Pendergast's endorsement would create an easy campaign victory.

Date: 
May 21st 1932

Letter from Barney E. Reilly to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on May 23, 1932. Reilly discusses Franklin D. Roosevelt's primary campaign as it relates to Kansas City and northwestern Missouri politics.

Date: 
May 23rd 1932

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to George G. Vest on June 15, 1932. Mitchell informs Vest that he met with James P. Aylward, Jerome Welch, and Greenwade on behalf's of Vest's campaign for Congress. Mitchell says C. W. Greenwade will urge Thomas J. Pendergast to support Vest as well.

Date: 
June 15th 1932

Letter from George G. Vest to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 16, 1932. Vest informs Mitchell that August A. Busch sent Otto Mathi to meet with Thomas J. Pendergast and James A. Reed in support of Vest's campaign for Congress. He also comments that he will soon meet with Pendergast and Judge Welch.

Date: 
June 16th 1932

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to George G. Vest on July 9, 1932. Mitchell informs Vest of C. W. Greenwade's belief that Thomas J. Pendergast will not support more than 7-8 candidates for Congress. Thus, Mitchell suggests that Vest seeks the support of other Kansas City leaders in his campaign.

Date: 
July 9th 1932

Letter from Ewing Cockrell to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in which Cockrell informs Mitchell that Thomas J. Pendergast will not support Cockrell as a candidate in the upcoming election. Instead, Cockrell requests that Mitchell aids him in his campaign.

Date: 
July 22nd 1932

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.