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Letter from Joseph F. Keirnan, Director of the Department of Liquor Control of Kansas City to attorney Jerome K. Walsh. Keirnan talks of his meeting with former North Side [Columbus Park] precinct captain Johnnie Cozzi. Cozzi devulged that Gene Paul Bradshaw, Republican candidate for Missouri governor, visited the Jungle Club at 313 East 10th Street where he spoke with Bully Rich, an "Italian hoodlum", who pledged his support for Bradshaw.

Date: 
October 2nd 1944

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 11769: United States vs. Pat Noonan, Joe School, Charles Binaggio, Milan Redis, Glen White, Eddie Moran, Link Moran, Silas Counts, and Frank Hart, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiracy to "barter, sell, transport and manufacture certain intoxicating liquors, to-wit: whiskey, alcohol, gin, ale and beer" and with maintaining a common nuisance at the White House Tavern, or Kit Kat Nite Club, near 82nd and Troost.

Date: 
October 4th 1932

Warrant to apprehend in Criminal Case No. 11769: United States vs. Pat Noonan, Joe School, Charles Binaggio, Milan Redis, Glen White, Eddie Moran, Link Moran, Silas Counts, and Frank Hart, defendants. Commissioner James S. Summers approved the warrant to arrest the defendants per an account by Special Agent Martin J. Lahart that he and another investigator were able to purchase six whiskey highballs, and witnessed other customers purchasing cocktails and beer.

Date: 
September 27th 1932

Order in Criminal Case No. 11769: United States vs. Pat Noonan, Joe School, Charles Binaggio, Milan Redis, Glen White, Eddie Moran, Link Moran, Silas Counts, and Frank Hart, defendants. Judge Albert L. Reeves orders the case be dismissed.

Date: 
February 6th 1934

Memorandum regarding Gus Gargotta, describing him as a brother of Charles Gargotta and operator of the Green Hills gambling club near Parkville, Missouri. He is also described as having interest in other gambling establishments in Kansas City, Missouri, and Kansas City, Kansas, and also been charged with bank robbery, murder, and other crimes.

Date: 
July 14th 1950

Report from KCPD Homicide Bureau after questioning James Balestrere. Balestrere told the officers he works for his son at a liquor store on 18th Street, and "has been out of the rackets for some time." He denied knowledge of the Mafia or Black Hand Society, and said that he had no information on the killings of Charles Binaggio or Charles Gargotta.

Date: 
April 15th 1950

Memorandum regarding "Johnny Mag" Mangiaracina, noting that he has a history of 48 arrests by the Kansas City Police Department, and a felony conviction for fur robbery. Mangiaracina is described as "a third-rate hoodlum" who is affiliated with Kansas City boss Charles Binaggio. Thomas Simone is listed as his "constant friend and inseparable companion."

Letter from Joseph T. Lenge to Charles Binaggio, thanking him for the support of the First Ward Democratic Club in a recent campaign. Lenge was a candidate for Jackson County assessor in 1948.

Date: 
November 9th 1948

Summary of the testimony that Sheridan E. Farrell, manager of the Philips Hotel and former police commissioner, is expected to provide. Farrell denies that "his desire to change the police chief had anything to do with his desire to have an open town," and denies speaking to Kansas City crime boss Charles Binaggio about the police board or having an open town, and asserts that Jacob "Tuck" Milligan recommended Braun for chief of police.

Memorandum regarding Nick Penna, Charles Binaggio's chauffeur and bodyguard who is "believed to have the true story of the Binaggio murder." The memo also describes Penna as on the payroll of a company owned by Anthony Gizzo.

Profile of Tony Gizzo, a former "gambling and horse book operator" with connections to Chicago Mafia figures and with Kansas City's Charles Binaggio.

Memorandum regarding J. A. Purdome, sheriff of Jackson County, Missouri. The memo notes rumors that Purdome received payoffs from Jackson County taverns while serving as Chief Deputy in the Sheriff's office, and that those payoffs were split 50-50 with Kansas City crime boss Charles Binaggio.

Kansas City Police Department mugshot of Charles Binaggio. Binaggio, organized crime boss and ally of Tom Pendergast who rose to greater power after Pendergast's imprisonment, was found shot in April, 1950 along with Charles Gargotta at the First Ward Democratic Club.

Memorandum summarizing the biography and criminal activity of James Balestrere. Balestrere is reported to have been involved in bootlegging during Prohibition, running the Kansas City Syrup Company with Charles Binaggio, selling sugar to distillers, and then was involved in liquor distribution businesses after repeal with other individuals involved in organized crime.

Date: 
July 14th 1950

Memorandum containing a statement from an unnamed former member of the Kansas City Board of Police Commissioners and his contacts with Charles Binaggio. He describes efforts by "the Binaggio political group" to remove him from the police board, and a meeting with Binaggio arranged by Herman Rosenberg, wherein Binaggio stated that he felt his group was due patronage and favors due to their support of Governor Smith's election.

Date: 
May 15th 1950

Diagram from the Kansas City Hearings of the U.S. Senate Special Committee to Investigate Organized Crime in Interstate Commerce, illustrating the Kansas City Mafia's involvement in night clubs, liquor businesses, bookmaking and other gambling, voter fraud, narcotics, and murder, among other areas. Charles Binaggio is depicted as the leader of the organization, with Charles Gargotta, "Eddy Spitz" Ochadsey, Morris Klein, and Tano Lococo among his close associates.

Date: 
November 30th 1950

Report from Kansas City Police Department detectives listing "persons having masses said at the Holy Rosary Church in memory of Charles Gargotta," including Mr. and Mrs. Marion Nigro, Mr. and Mrs. Pete DiGiovanni, Mr. and Mrs. John Blando, and other individuals, families, and businesses.

Date: 
April 13th 1950

Memorandum about Morris "Snag" Klein, listing his involvement in various businesses, gambling undertakings, and Mafia affiliated organizations since 1947. Included are the Mo-Kan Publishing Company wire service, the Green Hills gambling club, a gambling venture at the Kay Hotel, and the Ace Sales and Equipment Company.

Report from Kansas City Police Department detectives listing "persons having masses said at the Holy Rosary Church in memory of Charles Gargotta," including Mr. and Mrs. Carl Civella, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Di Capo, and Mr. and Mrs. Joe Accurso, and other individuals, families, and businesses.

Date: 
April 13th 1950

Memorandum describing testimony from Morris "Snag" Klein, stating that he was a partner of Charles Binaggio in the Missouri Electric and Construction Company and Ace Sales and Equipment Company, as well as the Green Hills and Last Chance gambling clubs. He also described other business and gambling interests he had been involved in, and denied knowledge of anyone in Al Capone's mob.

Date: 
September 23rd 1950

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KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.