Search

Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the Kansas Citians of Italian descent and their often unfair treatment in the newspapers for their comparatively few members of organized crime, and descriptions of several "cultured and law-abiding" local Italians such as musicians M. A. Lenge, N. DeRubertis, Mike Russo, Arturo Corti, Gustavo Corti, and Rosemarie Brancato; artists Dante Cosentino, Frank Tommassini, and Paulo D'Anna; and scientists and teachers Dr.

Date: 
May 31st 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the “lug,” “an involuntary or forced contribution to something a luckless employee isn’t nearly as interested in” as his and his family’s own welfare. Other featured articles include “T. J. and W. T.” (page 2), about patching up of differences between William Kemper, Sr. ("Democratic national committeeman for Missouri") and Tom Pendergast (Democratic No.

Date: 
July 12th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about crime in Kansas City, the lack of accurate, trustworthy records about its frequency and location, and the city’s “inefficient, politically-controlled police department.” Other featured articles include: “Mister Welching” (p.

Date: 
July 5th 1935

Letter from May Sommers, State Field Director of the Women's Benefit Association, informing members about a lawsuit brought against their society and other fraternal organizations in Missouri.

Date: 
May 29th 1936

Letter from Robert Locke, Kansas City Journal-Post science editor, to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, requesting Stark's approval to start a "Stark for President" Club. He also writes of R. Emmet O'Malley's removal as head of the state insurance commission and other concerns about the extent of corruption in state politics and elections, and expresses his belief that Stark might "wrest control of the state Democratic Party from the Pendergast-Shannon-Clark faction."

Date: 
October 25th 1937

Letter from R. Emmet O'Malley, director of the Kansas City Water Department, to Robert E. Hannegan, regarding the candidacy of Mrs. McDaniels for statewide office. McDaniels was supported by "the St. Louis organization," and Tom Pendergast stated that he would not oppose their candidate. O'Malley writes that he "talked both with Jim Aylward and Senator Truman; both expressed themselves in accordance with Mr. Pendergast's views."

Date: 
December 19th 1938

Statement by a rival of Lloyd Stark in the 1936 Democratic primary for governor. The writer states "when I entered the gubernatorial contest my only hope was that I might help to arouse the people of our State against the infamy of the Pendergast machine," and was concerned about Stark's endorsement by the Pendergast machine. In light of Stark's work to clean up government and elections, however, he states "my attitude for the Governor's courage has become one of unstinted admiration."

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.