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Telegram from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to his nephew, Kansas City Court of Appeals judge, Ewing C. Bland, on March 24, 1932. Mitchell requests that Bland meet with Judge Cas Welch and Jim Aylward on Mitchell's behalf.

Date: 
March 24th 1932

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to George G. Vest on June 15, 1932. Mitchell informs Vest that he met with James P. Aylward, Jerome Welch, and Greenwade on behalf's of Vest's campaign for Congress. Mitchell says C. W. Greenwade will urge Thomas J. Pendergast to support Vest as well.

Date: 
June 15th 1932

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to J. W. McCammon on June 29, 1933. Mitchell suggests that McCammon travel to Kansas City to convince James P. Aylward, William T. Kemper, Sr., Thomas J. Pendergast, and Henry F. McElroy to write letter of support for McCammon for appointment to Assistant Director of the Federal Home Loan Bank in Springfield, Missouri.

Date: 
June 29th 1934

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to J. W. McCammon. After Mitchell's first letter to McCammon of June 29, 1933, Mitchell provides additional instructions for McCammon in order for him to receive an appointment to Assistant Director of the Federal Home Loan Bank in Springfield, Missouri.

Date: 
June 29th 1934

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to his nephew, Kansas City Court of Appeals judge Ewing C. Bland on January 18, 1937. Mitchell provides a heated and sometimes vulgar response to Bland's letters of May 14th and 16th, 1937. He asserts that James M. Pendergast influences the District Court of Appeals in Kansas City and that James P. Aylward is "not only hand in glove with the [Pendergast] outfit but is one of its exalted leaders." Mitchell implies that Bland should resign if Marie Plummer is not reinstated in her clerical position at the court.

Date: 
January 18th 1937

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to his nephew, Kansas City Court of Appeals Judge Ewing C. Bland, on January 25, 1937. Mitchell asserts that Bland should resign as judge if Pendergast continues to influence the court. He then substantiates his claim by providing quotes from Bland and Marie Plummer. Mitchell also provides a case as to why Plummer should be retained in her clerical position at the Kansas City Court of Appeals.

Date: 
January 25th 1936

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to William Hirth, publisher and managing editor of The Missouri Farmer, on April 20, 1940. Mitchell supports Lloyd C. Stark's efforts to dismantle the Pendergast Machine, but says that he cannot endorse Stark or anyone else that supports the New Deal. Mitchell also states that "The machine is by no means dead," and that it "is very much alive, not only in Kansas City, but throughout the state." He then provides his opinion on the outlook of the upcoming election for U.S. Senator from Missouri.

Date: 
April 20th 1940
KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.