Search

Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Portrait of William Volker, no date. Source: Kansas City Museum (George Fuller Green Collection).

University of Kansas City Administration Building
Author: 
Jason Roe
During a bright autumn day on October 1, 1933, nearly 2,000 people gathered in the shade of trees along the south side of Brush Creek to officially celebrate the opening of the University of Kansas City. Inspired speeches by Chairman of the Board Ernest E. Howard and Dr. Burris Jenkins, a prominent local minister, declared the founders' intention that the university should serve as an institution of opportunity for Kansas Citians who could not travel far away to attend college.

Clipping from the Kansas City Journal on November 8, 1924 showing the Board of Governors for the Liberty Memorial Association. The caption states that, "A copper plate has been made from the above photographs of members of the board of governors of the Liberty Memorial association, and will be placed in the cornerstone of the memorial shaft at the cornerstone laying ceremonies tomorrow. The copper plate was made and donated by the Holland Engraving company. The photos are by Strauss-Peyton.

Date: 
November 8th 1924

Souvenir program for the memorial of Frank C. Niles (1858-1932), philanthropist and President of the Niles & Moser Cigar Company. An address was made by Conrad H. Mann at the Salvation Army Citadel in Kansas City, Missouri on September 16, 1932. The document provides an extensive biography of Niles, who aided in the creation of the "Wheatley Mercy Ward for Negro children in Wheatley Provident Hospital" and "The Niles Home for Negro Children."

Date: 
September 16th 1932

Program for a "Testimonial Dinner in honor of Henry M. Beardsley", President of the Young Men's Christian Association in Kansas City, Missouri for the Diamond Jubilee of the organziation. Included is a portrait drawing of Beardsley and a history of the organization.

Date: 
January 11th 1935
Bathing a child at Florence Home
Author: 
Jason Roe

Elizabeth Bruce Crogman , who in 1925 founded Kansas City’s Florence Home for Colored Girls (which housed unwed African American women who...

William Volker
Author: 
Jason Roe

As the brainchild of Kansas City philanthropist William Volker, the Board of Public Welfare was the first modern welfare department in the United States, a groundbreaking forerunner to modern welfare programs, and intended as a counterbalance to the charitable activities of the city's political machines led by Tom Pendergast and Joe Shannon. The board was just one of Volker’s many memorable contributions that included the creation of Research Hospital , the establishment of the University of Kansas City (now UMKC), the Civic Research Institute, the purchase of the land for Liberty Memorial , and reportedly thousands of individuals who received his gifts when down on their luck.

Crttenton Home
Author: 
Jason Roe

Elizabeth Bruce Crogman, who in 1925 became founder of Kansas City’s Florence Home for Colored Girls to house unwed African American women who were pregnant, was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on May 1, 1894. The home functioned as the counterpart to similar organizations that served the area's white residents but denied care to young black women.

The Officers of the Society the Society for Suppression of Commercialized Vice's platform against vice and prostitution. The article covers the clean-up efforts taken to counter vice and how law enforcement is cracking down on all law violators. Document contains a reprint of a letter and the text of the Abatement Act. The article concludes with the attempts of the Society to push the Abatement Act into law.

Date: 
April 15th 1921
KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.