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Letter from I. N. Watson to Jesse Barrett discussing the recent Kansas City election, and the landcape of fraudulent voting and corruption which persists, despite recent reforms.

Date: 
April 4th 1938

Pamphlet written by Ewing Young Mitchell, former Assistant Secretary of Commerce in Franklin D. Roosevelt administration's first term. He first responds to Harry Truman's statement to a reporter that "he never had sought the support of the Pendergast political organization in Missouri" and that the Pendergast machine was not involved in scandal until after he was elected to the Senate.

Date: 
October 1944

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to J. W. McCammon on June 29, 1933. Mitchell suggests that McCammon travel to Kansas City to convince James P. Aylward, William T. Kemper, Sr., Thomas J. Pendergast, and Henry F. McElroy to write letter of support for McCammon for appointment to Assistant Director of the Federal Home Loan Bank in Springfield, Missouri.

Date: 
June 29th 1934

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to J. W. McCammon. After Mitchell's first letter to McCammon of June 29, 1933, Mitchell provides additional instructions for McCammon in order for him to receive an appointment to Assistant Director of the Federal Home Loan Bank in Springfield, Missouri.

Date: 
June 29th 1934

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to Lewis Goodson. He informs Goodson that he has written to Judge Henry F. McElroy and James M. Pendergast in support of Goodson's continued employment on the Kansas City Police force.

Date: 
April 8th 1932

Henry F. McElroy, Kansas City's first city manager and proponent of the Ten Year Plan.

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides details on Clark and Truman's political maneuvering: "Clark said he was to see Tuck [Jacob] Milligan yesterday and that he'd rub a little salt on Stark. He thinks maybe we can get 'em all in the race."

Date: 
July 27th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his endeavor to select the new Kansas City W.P.A. Director and then comments about those affiliated with the Pendergast machine: "Mr. [Matthew S.] Murray, Mr. [Henry F.] McElroy, Mr. [Otto P.] Higgins, and even Mr. [Tom] P. himself probably would pay all the ill-gotten loot they took for my position and clear conscience."

Date: 
October 27th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his morning, including a meeting with Boyle Clark. When inquired about Missouri Governor Lloyd C. Stark, Truman said to Boyle Clark, "... I hadn't and didn't want to hear from the S.O.B. and that so far as I am concerned I didn't give a damn what he did or intended to do..."

Date: 
August 21st 1940

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Independence, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this particularly revealing letter, Truman provides a detailed update on politics in Jackson County and says, "I have talked to T.J. [Tom Pendergast] and to Jim [James Pendergast] over the phone. T.J. is much better and gave me to understand that I could do as I pleased with the county."

Date: 
April 14th 1933

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Independence, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this revealing letter, Truman provides a detailed update on politics in Kansas City and says, "The Star is making a goat of me--not a Pendergast goat either but a tax goat. I'll lick the whole gang yet and make 'em like it."

Date: 
April 15th 1933

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Kansas City, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and his Jackson County Courthouse proposal to Conrad Mann, Henry F. McElroy, and Ruby Garrett.

Date: 
May 9th 1933

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Claridge in Saint Louis, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and his on Jackson County Courthouse proposal. After the courthouse is complete, Truman exclaims that, "...I can probably retire to a quiet job and enjoy life a little bit with my family. Not that I'm not enjoying it now but it is sometimes pretty hard on head and nerves."

Date: 
May 11th 1933

A longhand note written by Harry S. Truman while he was a judge for Jackson County, Missouri. In this note, Truman recounts his childhood and early adulthood. Notable events described include his construction of the Jackson County Courthouse, his start in politics, and his family history.

Date: 
May 14th 1934

A longhand note written by Harry S. Truman while he was a judge for Jackson County, Missouri. In this note, Truman exposes many of the names and relations of those involved with the Pendergast machine in Kansas City. Although supported by Pendergast, Truman comments on the machine thusly: "What chance is there for a clean honest administration of the city and county when a bunch vultures sit on the side lines and puke on the field[?]."

Letter from an unknown person to Judge Elihu W. Hayes, Henry F. McElroy, and Harry S. Truman in which the writer takes issue with the attached campaign card of Henry F. McElroy, Democratic candidate for Judge of County Court, Western (Kansas City) District.

Date: 
1924

Letter from Porter T. Hall to Judge Nelson E. Johnson in which Hall states he will no longer be voting for Johnson for Judge of Jackson County. Instead, he writes of his interest in the re-election of Judges Henry F. McElroy and Harry S. Truman.

Date: 
October 29th 1924

The souvenir program for the Irish-American Societies of Kansas City, Mo. Thirty-Seventh Annual Picnic, held in Fairyland Park in Kansas City, August 17, 1924. The program includes a list of activities, sponsors, and advertisements. Activities include athletic events divided into nine groups, including a "Fat Ladies' Race", of which the first prize is a five-pound box of chocolates. Portraits of Judges Henry F. McElroy and Harry S. Truman are included in the program. The back cover shows sponsorship by T. J. Pendergast.

Date: 
1924
Charles Lindbergh
Author: 
Jason Roe

On August 17, 1927, a jubilant crowd of 25,000 gathered at the site of the present-day Charles B. Wheeler Downtown Airport to listen to speeches given by Charles Lindbergh and city officials in...

Photograph of the letter from Mary McElroy to her father Henry F. McElroy detailing the terms of her ransom as demanded by Walter H. McGee. This reproduction was used as evidence against McGee in the Criminal Case No. 33947: State of Missouri vs. Walter H. McGee.

Date: 
May 27th 1933

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.