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A warrant to apprehend William E. Clifford, Anthony R. Gizzo, and August Spearo to answer for charges placed against them by the United States of America in criminal case No. 6207. These men are charged with having in their possession "17 ounces of morphine and about 21 ounces of cocaine and one pound of gum opium." Gizzo was widely known as part of the Kansas City Mafia and as lieutenant to John Lazia, Kansas City North End political boss.

Date: 
September 29th 1923

The indictment for Criminal Case No. 6207: U.S. vs. William E. Clifford, Anthony R. Gizzo, and August Spearo. Since the issuance of the warrant to apprehend, August Spearo's name is dropped from the case. The remaining men are charged with having in their possession fifteen ounces of morphine, one pound of gum opium, and 21 ounces of cocaine. Gizzo was widely known as part of the Kansas City Mafia and as lieutenant to John Lazia, Kansas City North End political boss.

Date: 
November 10th 1923

Letter from James E. Jones, Acting Prohibition Commisser, regarding the parole of Anthony R. Gizzo, Inmate #20547. Jones reiterates the facts of Gizzo's case and recommends he be denied parole as a "flagrant violator of the Harrison Narcotic Law." Gizzo was sentenced to one year and one day in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth on drug charges.

Date: 
February 26th 1924

Letter from Anthony R. Gizzo, Inmate #20547 to the United States Penitentiary Board of Parole, applying for parole and vowing to "live and remain at liberty without violating the laws." Gizzo was sentenced to one year and one day in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth on drug charges.

Date: 
March 21st 1924

Biographical sketch of Anthony R. Gizzo, Inmate #20547, to be attached to his application for parole, including family information and listing his legal representation. Gizzo was sentenced to one year and one day in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth on drug charges.

Date: 
1924

Mugshot and prison record of Anthony R. Gizzo, Inmate #20547, including biographical data as well as information about his conviction and sentencing. Gizzo was sentenced to two one-year terms, served concurrently, in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth on drug charges.

Date: 
January 24th 1924

Report from KCPD Homicide Bureau after questioning James Balestrere. Balestrere told the officers he works for his son at a liquor store on 18th Street, and "has been out of the rackets for some time." He denied knowledge of the Mafia or Black Hand Society, and said that he had no information on the killings of Charles Binaggio or Charles Gargotta.

Date: 
April 15th 1950

Memorandum regarding Tony Ballano, Kansas City organized crime figure. The memo summarizes biographical information, as well as his police record and involvement in criminal activities, as well as noting that he "has not been very prominent publicly in the last ten years." Ballano is described as "an old-time bomb thrower and Black Hander," who was shot six times by the police during a stake out.

Date: 
September 13th 1950

Memorandum regarding Nick Penna, Charles Binaggio's chauffeur and bodyguard who is "believed to have the true story of the Binaggio murder." The memo also describes Penna as on the payroll of a company owned by Anthony Gizzo.

Profile of Tony Gizzo, a former "gambling and horse book operator" with connections to Chicago Mafia figures and with Kansas City's Charles Binaggio.

Memorandum summarizing the biography and criminal activity of James Balestrere. Balestrere is reported to have been involved in bootlegging during Prohibition, running the Kansas City Syrup Company with Charles Binaggio, selling sugar to distillers, and then was involved in liquor distribution businesses after repeal with other individuals involved in organized crime.

Date: 
July 14th 1950

Diagram from the Kansas City Hearings of the U.S. Senate Special Committee to Investigate Organized Crime in Interstate Commerce, illustrating the Kansas City Mafia's involvement in night clubs, liquor businesses, bookmaking and other gambling, voter fraud, narcotics, and murder, among other areas. Charles Binaggio is depicted as the leader of the organization, with Charles Gargotta, "Eddy Spitz" Ochadsey, Morris Klein, and Tano Lococo among his close associates.

Date: 
November 30th 1950

Profiles of Kansas City organized crime figures Joe "Scarface" DiGiovanni, his brother Peter "Sugarhouse Pete" DiGiovanni, James Balestrere, Nicolo Impostato, Vincent Chiapetta, Thomas Lococo, Tony Gizzo, and Joseph DeLuca, including biographical information, discussions of criminal involvement and known associates, and records with the Kansas City Police Department. Charges including kidnapping, murder, Prohibition violations, selling narcotics, and other crimes. The document also notes whether these mens had been interviewed by the Kefauver Committee.

Report from Kansas City Police Department detectives listing "persons having masses said at the Holy Rosary Church in memory of Charles Gargotta," including Mr. and Mrs. Carl Civella, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Di Capo, and Mr. and Mrs. Joe Accurso, and other individuals, families, and businesses.

Date: 
April 13th 1950

Diagram from the U.S. Senate Special Committee to Investigate Organized Crime in Interstate Commerce, illustrating the Kansas City Mafia's engagement in narcotics, murder, gambling games and bookmaking, and liquor distribution. Names of alleged members are listed, as are victims of unsolved murders. The diagram also depicts the involvement of the Kansas City Mafia with organized crime in cities such as Chicago, New York, and Tampa.

Date: 
November 30th 1950

Profiles of prominent Kansas City organized crime figures, including Charles Binaggio, Gaetano "Thomas" Lococo, and James Balestrere.

Photographs and quotes from Tony Gizzo, Kansas City mafia figure, during his testimony before the U.S. Senate Special Committee to Investigate Organized Crime in Interstate Commerce, popularly known as the Kefauver Committee. Gizzo is quoted as saying "Senator, I wish to hell you would tell me what the Mafia is. I never even heard of it."

Date: 
1950

Memorandum regarding Tony Gizzo, who ran various bookmaking operations throughout Kansas City, as well as being involved in the liquor distribution business. Through these businesses he worked with Kansas City mob boss Charles Binaggio, Charles Carollo, Charles Gargotta, and others. Gizzo's suspected earnings from his gambling and liquor enterprises are included.

Letter from George H. White to U.S. Attorney Sam Wear regarding an investigation into Carl Carramusa. Carramusa is accused of being a representative of the Kansas City Narcotic Syndicate, a subsidiary of the Kansas City Mafia. The letter provides a history of Impostato's entry into Kansas City organized crime through John Lazia after arriving from Chicago in 1929, and connects the Kansas City narcotics trade with St. Louis, Tampa, Havana, and other cities.

Date: 
August 31st 1945

Letter, labeled "confidential," from an unknown correspondent to Mr. Halley, regarding information received from Kansas City crime boss Charles Binaggio's brother, Dominick. Tim Moran, a "big time gambler here under ... both Prendergasts [sic]," is reported to have instructed Charles Binaggio to support a Pendergast candidate in exchange for sparing numerous men in Binaggio's inner circle from income tax fraud indictments.

Date: 
July 23rd 1950
KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.