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Information for the trial of Criminal Case No. 4163: United States vs. Charles S. Gargotta and Charles Gargotta, defendants. The document states that the current charge of possession of whiskey is Charles S. Gargotta's second offense, per Frank Cunningham, Federal Prohibition Agent.

Date: 
April 20th 1921

Commitment in the trial of Criminal Case No. 4182: United States vs. Charley Gargotta, defendant. The document notes that Charles Gargotta was charged with "Violation of the Act of October 28, 1919," also known as the Volstead Act, and has been sentenced to a prison sentence of 30 days in the Jackson County Jail, "to commence at the expiration of sentence imposed in [Case] No. 4163."

Date: 
April 26th 1921

Commitment in Criminal Case No. 4414: United States vs. Charles Gargotta, defendant. Gargotta was found guilty of "the offense of Violation of the National Prohibition Act," and sentenced to serve six months in the Pettis County Jail in Sedalia, Missouri. The document also includes a certification of Gargotta's delivery to the Pettis County Sheriff on December 7, 1921, to begin serving his sentence.

Date: 
December 3rd 1921

Information in the trial of Criminal Case No. 4182: United States vs. Charley Gargotta, defendant. The document states that, per the affidavit of W. E. Dunigan, Federal Prohibition Agent, Charley Gargotta was in possession of a half pint of whiskey on December 29, 1920.

Date: 
April 25th 1921

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 4414: United States vs. Charles Gargotta, defendant. Gargotta is charged with three counts of selling whiskey: one half pint to Henry Fulton, two ounces to Harry Hall, and another two ounces to Set Carson on July 5, 1921. He was also charged, in a fourth count, of a second offense of possession of "intoxicating liquor."

Date: 
November 10th 1921

Verdict in the trial for Criminal Case No. 4414: United States vs. Charles Gargotta, defendant. Gargotta was found guilty in the first count and fourth counts of selling and possession of "an intoxicating beverage," i.e. whiskey, and not guilty of the second and third counts, also of the sale of whiskey. The verdicts are signed off on by N. C. Ewing, Foreman of the Jury.

Date: 
December 2nd 1921

Information in the trial of Criminal Case No. 5839: United States vs. Pete Cardina, Mike Titino, Thomas Tococo and Charles Gargotta, defendants. The document states that, per the affidavit of Arthur L. Curran, Federal Prohibition Agent, the defendants were found in possession of "a certain quantity of intoxicating liquor," i.e. one and one-fourth pints of whiskey. The affidavit also notes that Gargotta has a prior conviction of possession in violation of the National Prohibition Act.

Date: 
April 26th 1923

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 12584: United States vs. Charles Gargotta, defendant. Gargotta was charged in three counts related to the possession and concealment of two .45 caliber pistols that had been stolen from the National Guard Armory in Kansas City, Kansas. Gargotta was a Pendergast ally and organized crime leader, and the case is part of a shootout incident involving Sheriff Thomas Bash, rival bootlegger Ferris Anthon, and others.

Date: 
June 6th 1934

Verdict in the trial of Criminal Case No. 12584: United States vs. Charles Gargotta, defendant. The defendant was found guilty in all three counts of illegal weapons charges. Gargotta was a Pendergast ally and organized crime leader, and the case is part of a shootout incident involving Sheriff Thomas Bash, rival bootlegger Ferris Anthon, and others.

Date: 
June 20th 1934

Statement made by Charles Gargotta in Criminal Case No. 12584: United States vs. Charles Gargotta, defendant. Gargotta made a statement to Prosecuting Attorney T. A. J. Mastin in which he indicated that he was arrested on the street after leaving a woman's apartment on Armour Boulevard. He claimed that he only heard shooting to the east of him, and was not only was he unarmed at the time of his arrest, but that he had never owned an automatic pistol. He also took issue with other details of the case.

Date: 
August 12th 1933

Special Commissioner's Report by Leon P. Embry for Case No. 36717: State of Missouri on the information of Roy McKittrick, Attorney General, Relator, vs. Waller W. Graves, Prosecuting Attorney of Jackson County, Missouri, Respondent.

Date: 
April 6th 1940

Court Opinion by Judge Charles Thomas Hays for Case for Case No. 36717: State of Missouri on the information of Roy McKittrick, Attorney General, Relator, vs. Waller W. Graves, Prosecuting Attorney of Jackson County, Missouri, Respondent. Hays finds Graves guilty of purposefully neglecting his duties in prosecuting individuals in Jackson County openly engaging in voter fraud, the operation of gambling and prostitution establishments, and the sale of liquor late at night and on Sundays. Hays provides some of the evidence used in making his decision.

Date: 
September 3rd 1940

Memorandum from W. Harold Lane, Internal Revenue Service Special Agent, to the Special Agent in Charge (elsewhere identified as Charles O'B. Berry), regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The memo reports that, in a discussion with Governor Lloyd Stark about the conviction of Charles Gargotta for assault of Sheriff Thomas Bash, Stark stated that he suspected that Pendergast was "directing his political organization" while in prison.

Date: 
January 17th 1940

Memorandum summarizing the biography and criminal activity of James Balestrere. Balestrere is reported to have been involved in bootlegging during Prohibition, running the Kansas City Syrup Company with Charles Binaggio, selling sugar to distillers, and then was involved in liquor distribution businesses after repeal with other individuals involved in organized crime.

Date: 
July 14th 1950

First issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a statement on the newspaper's objective, maintaining that the newspaper is not against any certain political party or vice, but that it is simply for "good government". Featured articles include: “Council Passes Cab Ordinance” (pp. 2 & 4) discussing councilman Frank H. Backstrom’s reaction to the ordinance and detailing other ordinances appropriating bond funds.; "Adult Education--A Fine Work" (pp.

Date: 
January 11th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the Kansas Citians of Italian descent and their often unfair treatment in the newspapers for their comparatively few members of organized crime, and descriptions of several "cultured and law-abiding" local Italians such as musicians M. A. Lenge, N. DeRubertis, Mike Russo, Arturo Corti, Gustavo Corti, and Rosemarie Brancato; artists Dante Cosentino, Frank Tommassini, and Paulo D'Anna; and scientists and teachers Dr.

Date: 
May 31st 1935

Photograph of a crowd gathered around a Buick automobile on Armour Boulevard. The car belonged to mobster Gus "Steinie" Fasone and was the intended getaway vehicle following the murder of bootlegger Ferris Anthon by Charles Gargotta and accomplices. Fasone and fellow gangster Sam Scola were killed in the exhange by Sheriff Tom Bash. The picture was taken after the bodies were removed.

Date: 
August 12th 1933

Photograph of a large crowd surrounding a car at Armour Boulevard and Forest Avenue. The car belonged to mobster Gus "Steinie" Fasone and was the intended getaway vehicle following the murder of bootlegger Ferris Anthon by Charles Gargotta and accomplices. Fasone and fellow gangster Sam "Hog" Scola were killed in the exhange by Sheriff Tom Bash. Scola's body is slumped over the steering wheel.

Date: 
April 12th 1933

Photograph of mobster Charles Gargotta (center) being escorted to his arraignment at the Criminal Court Building to face charges of murdering bootlegger Ferris Anthon and the attempted murder of Sheriff Thomas Bash on August 12, 1933. He is being escorted by Chief Deputy William Schickhardt (left) and Deputy Al Finkelstine.

Date: 
August 16th 1933

Photograph looking northwest from the southeast corner of Armour Boulevard and Forest Avenue. The scene is part of investigation that took place following the August 12, 1933, murder of bootlegger Ferris Anthon by mobster Charles (Mad Dog) Gargotta and others. Sheriff Tom Bash killed to gangsters during the exchange.

Date: 
August 12th 1933

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.