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Pamphlet written by Ewing Young Mitchell, former Assistant Secretary of Commerce in Franklin D. Roosevelt administration's first term. He first responds to Harry Truman's statement to a reporter that "he never had sought the support of the Pendergast political organization in Missouri" and that the Pendergast machine was not involved in scandal until after he was elected to the Senate.

Date: 
October 1944

Judgments and commitments in Criminal Case No. 14578: United States vs. Charles Carollo, defendant. Carollo, a Kansas City mob boss, was found guilty in the charge of perjury and sentenced to four years in the penitentiary.

Date: 
October 20th 1939

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14462: United States vs. Charles V. Carollo, defendant. Carollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss, and was charged with mailing a letter and unsigned bill of sale granting one-quarter ownership of a lottery-style gaming operation, the Fortune Skill-Ball game, at 2 West 39th Street.

Date: 
April 17th 1939

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14462: United States vs. Charles V. Carollo, defendant. Carollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss, and was charged with mailing a letter and unsigned bill of sale granting one-quarter ownership of a lottery-style gaming operation, the Fortune Skill-Ball game, at 2 West 39th Street.

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14578: United States vs. Charles V. Carollo, defendant. Carollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss, and was charged with "wilfully ... attempting to evade and defeat a large part of the income tax upon his net income" for 1937 and 1938. The untaxed income at issue is alleged to be "lug and protection money from gambling establishments."

Date: 
June 8th 1939

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14462: United States vs. Charles V. Carollo, defendant. Carollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss, and was charged with mailing a letter and unsigned bill of sale granting one-quarter ownership of a lottery-style gaming operation, the Fortune Skill-Ball game, at 2 West 39th Street.

Date: 
June 9th 1939

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14639: United States vs. Charles V. Carollo, defendant. Carollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss, and was charged with income tax evasion in the years 1935-1939. The indictment details his sources of income, including smoke and cigar shops, gaming and gambling operations, casinos, liquor distributors, and nightclubs and bars.

Date: 
July 21st 1939

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14573: United States vs. Charles V. Carollo, defendant. Carollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss, and was charged in connection with his application for naturalization as a United States citizen. The indictment states that Carollo had, under oath, sworn that during the years prior to filing for naturalization, he had "behaved as a personal of good moral character," and specifically, that he had denied receiving any profit from gambling or gaming. The indictment charges that he knowingly perjured himself in doing so.

Date: 
May 26th 1939

Application for bill of particulars in Criminal Case No. 14573: United States vs. Charles Carollo, defendant, stating that specific matters in the indictment are "vague, indefinite, uncertain, ambiguous, equivocal, and contradictory." The document requests more names, locations, and other details of the "gambling parlors" and "gambling games" that Carollo is accused of profiting from.

Date: 
June 8th 1939

Application for bill of particulars in Criminal Case No. 14573: United States vs. Charles Carollo, defendant, stating that specific matters in the indictment are "vague, indefinite, uncertain, ambiguous, equivocal, and contradictory." The document requests more names, locations, and other details of the "gambling establishments" that Carollo is accused of collecting, or authorizing other people to collect, "lug and protection money" from.

Date: 
June 19th 1939

Sentencing in Criminal Case No. 14578: United States vs. Charles Carollo, defendant. Carollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss, and was found guilty of perjury by jury trial. Judge Merrill E. Otis writes that the proof of Carollo's guilt was "overwhelming," discusses the seriousness of perjury as "gravely threatening to the well-being of the state," and notes that the maximum punishment allowed is five years' imprisonment and a $2,000 fine.

Date: 
October 20th 1939

Docket entries in Criminal Case No. 14639: United States vs. Charles Carollo, defendant. Carollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss. The document lists the timeline of events in the case, including the indictment filing on July 21, 1939, guilty pleas on counts 3 and 4 on October 19, 1939, and sentencing on October 29, 1939. Carollo was committed to the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth on November 14, 1939, and a notice of appeal was filed on September 9, 1943.

Date: 
September 9th 1943

Judgments and commitments in Criminal Case No. 14581: United States vs. Charles Carollo, defendant. Carollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss, entered a plea of guilty and was sentenced to one year and one day in penitentiary, to run consecutively with his sentence in case No. 14578.

Date: 
October 20th 1939

U.S. Attorney's report on Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, which records Higgins' defense attorney, summarizes the charges, and notes the sentence imposed. The report notes that the income Higgins is charged with evading taxes on was received from "protected gamblers and other forms of organized vice." U.S. Attorney Richard K. Phelps recommends against parole, while Judge J. C.

Date: 
May 13th 1940

U.S. Attorney's report on Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, recording Higgins' defense attorney, summarizing the charges, and noting that "the aggravating circumstances are that the income unreported by this prisoner was derived form the lowest and worst elements of the organized underworld of Kansas City." U.S. Attorney Richard K. Phelps reports that local mobster Charles Carollo is a suspected associate, and recommends against parole. Judge J. C. Collet does not concur, noting that this conviction is Higgins' first offense.

Date: 
June 3rd 1940

Report from KCPD Homicide Bureau after questioning James Balestrere. Balestrere told the officers he works for his son at a liquor store on 18th Street, and "has been out of the rackets for some time." He denied knowledge of the Mafia or Black Hand Society, and said that he had no information on the killings of Charles Binaggio or Charles Gargotta.

Date: 
April 15th 1950

Memorandum including biographical and criminal history for Frank DeLuca, Kansas City organized crime figure. DeLuca immigrated from Italy in 1923 to join his brothers Joseph and Samuel, associates of Mafia boss Johnny Lazia. DeLuca is described as being a close associate of St. Louisan Tony Lopiparo, and as having killed a man named Ed Murry in his Florida Blossom saloon in 1936. He was also investigated for involvement in alcohol and narcotics violations.

Date: 
1950

Diagram from the U.S. Senate Special Committee to Investigate Organized Crime in Interstate Commerce, illustrating the Kansas City Mafia's engagement in narcotics, murder, gambling games and bookmaking, and liquor distribution. Names of alleged members are listed, as are victims of unsolved murders. The diagram also depicts the involvement of the Kansas City Mafia with organized crime in cities such as Chicago, New York, and Tampa.

Date: 
November 30th 1950

Memorandum regarding Peter DiGiovanni, former Kansas City bootlegger and brother of Joseph DiGiovanni. The two brothers operated Mid-West Distribution Company, a liquor distributor throughout Jackson County, which also employed other mafia-affiliated men. The DiGiovannis were also allegedly associated with organized crime figure Charles Carollo, James Balestrere, and John Blando during Prohibition. Investigators want to know what information he has about employee Paul Cantanzaro, a suspect in the murder of Frank Caramussa, Jr.

Memorandum regarding Joseph DiGiovanni, former Kansas City bootlegger and brother of Peter DiGiovanni. The two brothers operated Mid-West Distribution Company, a liquor distributor throughout Jackson County, and "went into the liquor business immediately after [Prohibition] repeal." DiGiovanni plead guilty to Prohibition and and liquor violations during the 1920s.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.