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Letter from Ewing C. Bland to his uncle, Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on January 20, 1936. In Bland's lengthy response, he explains how the public views Bland and Mitchell to be connected politically, and how Mitchell consistently jeopardizes Bland by attacking the Kansas City organization for Mitchell's own political gain. Because of Bland's diminished political standing and Mitchell's public connection with Marie Plummer, it would be impossible to leverage for her reinstatement without being charged with nepotism.

Date: 
January 20th 1936

Letter from Marie Plummer to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on January 20, 1937. In the matter of Plummer's attempts at reinstatement of her clerical position at the Kansas City Court of Appeals, Plummer wishes that Mitchell would have instructed Ewing C. Bland to speak with James P. Aylward on Bland's own behalf. She asserts Bland is using an alibi so that he does not have to help her.

Date: 
January 20th 1936

Letter from Marie Plummer to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on January 22, 1937. Plummer updates Mitchell on her conversation with Ewing C. Bland concerning Plummer's termination as clerk at the Kansas City Court of Appeals. She transmits Bland's response to Mitchell's most recent letter to him, communicating that using his influence to retain Plummer in her position would hurt his reelection campaign in the near future. Although Bland asserts he is not under any political influence, Plummer strongly disagrees and urges Mitchell not to further anger him.

Date: 
January 22nd 1936

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to his nephew, Kansas City Court of Appeals Judge Ewing C. Bland, on January 25, 1937. Mitchell asserts that Bland should resign as judge if Pendergast continues to influence the court. He then substantiates his claim by providing quotes from Bland and Marie Plummer. Mitchell also provides a case as to why Plummer should be retained in her clerical position at the Kansas City Court of Appeals.

Date: 
January 25th 1936

Senator Harry S. Truman, Thomas J. Pendergast, James P. Aylward, James Farley, N. G. Robertson, and David Fitzgerald at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Date: 
June 24th 1936

Letter from Thomas McGee to Harry S. Truman in which McGee informs Truman that McGee's son-in-law, John Lillis, was let go from his job at the Federal Housing Administration. He reminds Truman that James P. Aylward and James M. Pendergast had recommended Lillis for an appointment by Truman, and that Lillis was his only relative with a political appointment. McGee also reminds Truman of Thomas J. Pendergast's upcoming travel in which Truman will meet with him.

Date: 
April 6th 1936

Letter from Thomas McGee to Harry S. Truman in which McGee discloses his efforts to get Pendergast and James P. Aylward to help re-appoint his son-in-law, John Lillis, to the Federal Housing Administration. McGee says that Pendergast may seek the help of Truman and Bennett C. Clark in this matter. He also informs Truman of his meeting with William Boyle and J. J. Pryor of Boyle-Pryor Construction Company.

Date: 
April 16th 1936

Clipping from the Kansas City Journal-Post from May 20, 1936 showing attendees of the "Cradle of Missouri Democracy" rally in Fayette, Missouri. Pictured are Lloyd C. Stark, Katherine Stark, James P. Aylward, James M. Pendergast, John C. Stapel, W. L. Bouchard, Gil P. Bourk, and Max Asotsky.

Date: 
May 20th 1936

Letter from Robert Locke, Kansas City Journal-Post science editor, to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, requesting Stark's approval to start a "Stark for President" Club. He also writes of R. Emmet O'Malley's removal as head of the state insurance commission and other concerns about the extent of corruption in state politics and elections, and expresses his belief that Stark might "wrest control of the state Democratic Party from the Pendergast-Shannon-Clark faction."

Date: 
October 25th 1937

Letter from Marie Plummer to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on January 15, 1937. Plummer recounts when she was informed that she was fired from her clerical work at the District Court of Appeals in Kansas City. She then details her attempts at reinstatement by appealing to those close to Thomas J. Pendergast.

Date: 
January 15th 1937

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to his nephew, Kansas City Court of Appeals judge Ewing C. Bland on January 18, 1937. Mitchell provides a heated and sometimes vulgar response to Bland's letters of May 14th and 16th, 1937. He asserts that James M. Pendergast influences the District Court of Appeals in Kansas City and that James P. Aylward is "not only hand in glove with the [Pendergast] outfit but is one of its exalted leaders." Mitchell implies that Bland should resign if Marie Plummer is not reinstated in her clerical position at the court.

Date: 
January 18th 1937

Letter from Marie Plummer to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on February 2, 1937. Plummer reports that a friend, Clif Langsdale, was able to extend her employment as deputy clerk at the Kansas City Court of Appeals potentially until August 1, 1937. She recounts a conversation she had with Bland in which Bland does not believe the court to be influenced by Pendergast since the machine does not dictate opinions. However, Plummer believes the court to be compromised since all recently hired employees come with a Pendergast endorsement.

Date: 
February 2nd 1937

Letter from Ewing C. Bland to his uncle, Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on February 2, 1937. In this restrained letter, Bland attempts to undermine the credibility of Marie Plummer and her statements she charged Bland with saying. He then clarifies his position on Plummer's continued employment at the Kansas City Court of Appeals and details the actions he used to try to help her. Bland then asserts again that Mitchell's statements against the machine compromised Plummer's chances of continued employment as deputy clerk.

Date: 
February 2nd 1937

Office memo from Margaret Carr to Mr. Forman, with the subject line indicating the content is "confidential information from Mr. Harnsbarger." The memo reports that Dick Nacy intends to run for state chairman, and that he will likely receive the support of the Pendergast machine if Jim Aylward opts out.

Date: 
August 19th 1938

Telegram from Charles M. Hay to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, on the issue of Jim Aylward for state Democratic Party chairman. He writes "in my opinion it would be grievous mistake for you to consent to Ayleward [sic] or any other Pendergast afficiliate [sic] for state chairman."

Date: 
August 31st 1938

Letter from R. Emmet O'Malley, director of the Kansas City Water Department, to Robert E. Hannegan, regarding the candidacy of Mrs. McDaniels for statewide office. McDaniels was supported by "the St. Louis organization," and Tom Pendergast stated that he would not oppose their candidate. O'Malley writes that he "talked both with Jim Aylward and Senator Truman; both expressed themselves in accordance with Mr. Pendergast's views."

Date: 
December 19th 1938

Letter from Sam M. Wear to James P. Aylward in which Wear requests more money to use during the final days of 1938 Congressional Election.

Date: 
November 1st 1938

Press release containing the test of a statement given by William Hirth, publisher of the Missouri Farmer and president of the Missouri Farmers' Association, regarding the state Democratic convention. Hirth reports that the recent "convention in St. Louis was the most shameful gathering of its kind in the history of Missouri," and describes animosity between Clark-Pendergast forces and Governor Lloyd C. Stark.

Date: 
April 21st 1940

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to William Hirth, publisher and managing editor of The Missouri Farmer, on April 20, 1940. Mitchell supports Lloyd C. Stark's efforts to dismantle the Pendergast Machine, but says that he cannot endorse Stark or anyone else that supports the New Deal. Mitchell also states that "The machine is by no means dead," and that it "is very much alive, not only in Kansas City, but throughout the state." He then provides his opinion on the outlook of the upcoming election for U.S. Senator from Missouri.

Date: 
April 20th 1940

Letter from James P. Aylward to Sam M. Wear in which Aylward invites Wear to a Democratic National Committee meeting of Missouri Democrats at Kansas City on October 1, 1940.

Date: 
September 25th 1940

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.