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Letter from James H. White to Lloyd C. Stark, in which Stark asks if he might make speeches in support of Judge James Douglas' campaign for Missouri Supreme Court and offers information about the campaign support with Kansas City Democrats. White writes that he has "been unemployed for more than two and one half years at this time," and suggests the reason is related to machine control.

Date: 
July 6th 1938

Telegram from Bonnie Mary Wyatt to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, requesting additional protection at Kansas City polling places for the upcoming election for herself and her husband. She reports that they and a number of friends "have been threatened because we are working for Coalition ticket."

Date: 
March 29th 1938

Letter from Ernest O. Boone, principal of the Dunbar School, to Lloyd C. Stark congratulating Stark on his election as Director of the State Chamber of Commerce, as well as discussing African-American politics in Missouri.

Date: 
May 7th 1933

Letter from Ernest O. Boone to Lloyd C. Stark regarding desired job appointments for he and his wife.

Date: 
February 4th 1933

Enclosed list of endorsements for a job appointment desired by Ernest O. Boone.

Date: 
February 4th 1933

Letter from Hugh O'Connor to Guy B. park demanding an investigation into the August 4, 1936 primary election and the ouster of the election commissioners and election judges and clerks.

Date: 
August 19th 1936

Letter from Hugh O'Connor to Guy B. Park asserting that the governor is surely a proper person to hear complaints about election fraud in the state and listing specific allegations from the recent primary election.

Date: 
August 20th 1936

Telegram from Lucile Bluford to University of Missouri President F. A. Middlebush regarding her denial of admission to the university's journalism school. She notes that she was referred to Lincoln University, the state's black university, but that they offer no journalism courses. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism.

Date: 
September 14th 1939

Letter from Lucile Bluford to University of Missouri registrar S. W. Canada, frustrated because she has not received a reply to her telegram of February 11. She writes that, while Canada insists he has no authority to admit her to the university, other MU officials report that he is the sole authority on such matters. She reiterates that Lincoln University offers no journalism courses, leading her to demand admission to the University of Missouri, and includes a check for $41.50 to cover student fees for the coming semester.

Date: 
February 16th 1941

Telegram from Lucile Bluford to University of Missouri President Frederick A. Middlebush, stating that university registrar has rejected her application for admission for six straight semesters due to her race, despite her credits having previously been acceptable, and reiterating that Lincoln University does not offer a journalism program. She requests that Middlebush "extend democracy in our own state" at a time that "negro boys as well as white are about to sacrifice their lives on the battlefield" in defense of democracy.

Date: 
September 19th 1941

Letter from Lucile Bluford to University of Missouri registrar S. W. Canada, insisting upon admission to the University of Missouri as Lincoln University will not offer a journalism program for the coming fall semester.

Date: 
August 21st 1941

Letter from Lucile Bluford to Lincoln University president Dr. Sherman D. Scruggs that she asks to be considered as a standing application to the university as a graduate student in journalism.

Date: 
April 28th 1942

Letter from Lucile Bluford to University of Missouri registrar S. W. Canada that she asks to be considered as a standing application to the university as a graduate student in journalism. Bluford writes that Canada's attorney William S. Hogsett used "open appeals to race prejudice" in federal court, and refuses to let that thwart her career.

Date: 
April 28th 1942
KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.