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Pamphlet written by Ewing Young Mitchell, former Assistant Secretary of Commerce in Franklin D. Roosevelt administration's first term. He asserts "[t]he first nomination for United States Senator of Harry S. Truman was stolen," and proceeds to argue that point. The Pendergast machine is described as "the most corrupt, the most brazen, gang of thieves who ever looted an American city," and describes the Pendergasts' businesses' activities and obstructions around the city.

Date: 
October 6th 1944

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to his nephew, Kansas City Court of Appeals Judge Ewing C. Bland, on December 31, 1920. Mitchell comments that Sanford Madden should not the support of all Kansas City political factions in order to be a strong candidate for marshal. Mitchell contends that Thomas J. Pendergast's endorsement is not needed if Madden has the support of James A. Reed and Judge Miles Bulger.

Date: 
December 31st 1920

Telegram from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to his nephew, Kansas City Court of Appeals judge, Ewing C. Bland, on March 24, 1932. Mitchell requests that Bland meet with Judge Cas Welch and Jim Aylward on Mitchell's behalf.

Date: 
March 24th 1932

Telegram from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to judge Casmir J. Welch on March 24, 1932. Mitchell encourages Cas Welch's support of Franklin D. Roosevelt for President.

Date: 
March 24th 1932

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Hon. Jerome Walsh on May 11, 1932. Mitchell inquires what intention Thomas J. Pendergast and James A. Reed might have during their trip to Chicago.

Date: 
May 11th 1932

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to George G. Vest on June 15, 1932. Mitchell informs Vest that he met with James P. Aylward, Jerome Welch, and Greenwade on behalf's of Vest's campaign for Congress. Mitchell says C. W. Greenwade will urge Thomas J. Pendergast to support Vest as well.

Date: 
June 15th 1932

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to George G. Vest on July 9, 1932. Mitchell informs Vest of C. W. Greenwade's belief that Thomas J. Pendergast will not support more than 7-8 candidates for Congress. Thus, Mitchell suggests that Vest seeks the support of other Kansas City leaders in his campaign.

Date: 
July 9th 1932

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Hon. C. W. Greenwade on November 17, 1932. Mitchell offers advise in Greenwade's attempt at securing a Post Master position in Greene County, Missouri. Mitchell believes he will get it if he secures the endorsement of Thomas J. Pendergast and William T. Kemper, Sr..

Date: 
November 17th 1932

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Langdon W. Post, in which Mitchell requests Post's projection of the Kansas City election results. He believes that, "the Pendergast machine will be smashed if there is anything like an honest count of votes."

Date: 
February 4th 1934

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to his nephew, Kansas City Court of Appeals judge Ewing C. Bland on February 11, 1934. Mitchell requests information concerning the Kansas City Republican organization’s ticket and strategy for the upcoming local election.

Date: 
February 11th 1934

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Bernarr MacFadden on March 8, 1934. Mitchell provides an account of the political climate in Kansas City and requests that the Liberty Magazine write an exposé on the election fraud there. He also suggests that wealthy donors offer "rewards for convictions of corrupt judges and clerks of election and persons voting illegally."

Date: 
March 8th 1934

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Homer S. Cummings in which Mitchell provides a detailed account of Kansas City politics and voter suppression. He urges Cummings to travel to Kansas City to support candidates that oppose the Pendergast machine.

Date: 
March 12th 1934

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Bernarr MacFadden on March 16, 1934. After learning that MacFadden may not be able to accomplish what Mitchell requested, Mitchell continues to stress the importance of exposing the voter fraud and suppression in Kansas City.

Date: 
March 16th 1934

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to James A. Farley on March 20, 1934. Mitchell discusses C. W. Greenwade's appointment for postmaster at Springfield, Missouri as well as the upcoming election in Kansas City, Missouri.

Date: 
March 20th 1934

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to R. E. Joyce on March 24, 1934. Mitchell inquires if it is true that Thomas J. Pendergast recently received a license to distill spirits.

Date: 
March 24th 1934

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to R. B. Oliver on March 26, 1934. Mitchell informs Oliver that the Kansas City local election takes place the following day and provides some instances of voter fraud there. He says, "In the north end of Kansas City... the census shows a population of 6,000 and in the same area the registered vote is 30,000."

Date: 
March 26th 1934

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to J. W. McCammon on June 29, 1933. Mitchell suggests that McCammon travel to Kansas City to convince James P. Aylward, William T. Kemper, Sr., Thomas J. Pendergast, and Henry F. McElroy to write letter of support for McCammon for appointment to Assistant Director of the Federal Home Loan Bank in Springfield, Missouri.

Date: 
June 29th 1934

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to J. W. McCammon. After Mitchell's first letter to McCammon of June 29, 1933, Mitchell provides additional instructions for McCammon in order for him to receive an appointment to Assistant Director of the Federal Home Loan Bank in Springfield, Missouri.

Date: 
June 29th 1934

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Charles A. Lee, State Superintendent, Department of Public Schools, on November 19, 1934. Mitchell expresses his condolences that Lee was not renominated as State Superintendent and that a Pendergast-affiliated candidate was elected in his stead.

Date: 
November 19th 1934

A ten page typewritten history of Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr.'s political career in relation to Missouri politics through 1935 when the President of the United States removed him from office.

Date: 
1936

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.