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Letter from Harry S. Truman to his fiancée Bess Wallace while Truman was at Camp La Baholle, near Verdun, France. Truman describes his life's dreams and expectations following the war, including his desire to be a farmer. He states, "I've almost come to the conclusion that it's not intended for me ever to be very rich, nor very poor, and I am about convinced that that will be about the happiest state a man can be."

Date: 
December 14th 1918

Photocopy of a military circular letter that calls fourteen officers of the 130th Field Artillery to be present at a general court-martial for persons unnamed in the letter. Among these officers are 1st Lieutenant James M. Pendergast, who had previously served with Harry S. Truman in the 129th Field Artillery. The Harry S. Truman Library and Museum does not hold the original document.

Date: 
April 25th 1918

A World War I Color Guard (either 128th or 129th field artillery or 140th infantry) marches down Grand Avenue (now Grand Boulevard) in Kansas City, Missouri, in a parade of soldiers returning home from Europe. From: Mrs. D. S. Catechis.

Date: 
May 1919

World War I soldiers, returning from Europe, march down Grand Avenue, Kansas City, Missouri, in a victory parade. Union Station can be seen faintly in the background to the southwest. From: Mrs. D. S. Catechis.

Date: 
May 1919

Soldiers returning from Europe at the end of World War I march down Grand Avenue (now Grand Boulevard) in Kansas City, Missouri, as people toss flowers into the street. From: Mrs. D. S. Catechis.

Date: 
May 1919

Returning to Kansas City for reception and parade after World War I. From an album of Lorain H. Cunningham, who served in the 129th Field Artillery during World War I and was a friend of Harry S. Truman. The photo was titled, "Our return to Kansas City".

Date: 
May 3rd 1919

View of military and Union Station, Kansas City, Missouri, at the parade in honor of the return of the 129th Field Artillery from France to Kansas City, Missouri. From: 35th Division Collection. This photograph was taken looking northeast from just south of Union Station.

Date: 
May 1919

Letter from Harry S. Truman to his fiancée Bess Wallace while Truman was at Camp La Baholle, near Verdun, France. Truman gives insight into his personality as a leader, stating that, "If there's one thing I've always hated in a man it is to see him take his spite out on someone who couldn't talk back to him.".

Date: 
January 11th 1919

Letter from Harry S. Truman to his fiancée Bess Wallace while Truman was at Camp La Baholle, near Verdun, France. Truman shows humility as he urges Bess to not inform others of his letter of commendation, stating that, "There's not one of us who have done anything that any other one of us could not and would not have done if the opportunity had offered."

Date: 
January 19th 1919

Letter from Harry S. Truman to his fiancée Bess Wallace while Truman was in France near Bar-le-Duc. Truman asserts his intention to marry Bess as soon as he returns from Europe, even though he has no money, stating that, "I haven't any place to go but home and I'm busted financially but I love you as madly as a man can and I'll find all the other things."

Date: 
February 18th 1919

Harry S. Truman's Kansas City Club certificate of membership and receipt for the same. As of October 3, 1919, Truman had payed the full membership and initiation fee of $275.00.

Date: 
October 3rd 1919

Letter from Kansas City Club Secretary W. G. Randall to Harry S. Truman. This correspondence serves as receipt that the Board of Directors accepts Truman's resignation from the Kansas City Club.

Date: 
September 22nd 1920

Harry S. Truman and the 129th Field Artillery in front of the Muehlebach Hotel during the November 1921 Armistice parade in Kansas City, MO. Truman is in uniform, on the far side of the street, behind the man in the suit. This photograph was taken looking southeast on 12th Street just west of Baltimore Avenue.

Date: 
November 1921

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Robidoux in St. Joseph, Missouri to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In the letter, Truman mentions sharing his hotel room with James Pendergast during an American Legion State Convention. Truman comments that James is, "a nice boy and as smart as the old man he's named for."

Date: 
September 20th 1921

The program for the Fourth Annual Mess Call of the Battery "D" 129th Field Artillery, held as a St. Patrick's Day Banquet at the Elks Club in Kansas City, March 17, 1921. The program includes the list of speakers, menu, and lyrics for the songs sung at the event. Speakers include, "Little Jimmy Pendergast-Who takes subscriptions for the Star" and "Capt. Truman-Shirts, Socks, Checks and Hootch." Each of the menu items also include entertaining quips.

Date: 
1921

Scene in Kansas City, Missouri, looking west on 13th street near Oak Street. From: Kansas City Chamber of Commerce.

Date: 
1922

An invitation to the Democratic Union Mass Meeting on February 21, 1922 at the Woman's City Club at 1111 Grand Avenue, Kansas City, Missouri.

Date: 
1922

Letter from Harry S. Truman to W. F. Woodruff in which Truman provides a list of "good Democrats, who are the kind of men we want." The seven men listed live in Kansas City and the southern suburbs of Grandview, Martin City, and Hickman Mills, Missouri.

Date: 
January 25th 1922

Letter from W. F. Woodruff to Harry S. Truman in which Woodruff approves Democratic Union membership to five of the men Truman recommended in previous correspondence. Woodruff urges Truman in "making these persons real converts to our cause...".

Date: 
January 30th 1922

Newsletter from the Democratic Union aimed at increasing membership. The union invites its members to a dinner for this purpose on February 3, 1922 at 1111 Grand Avenue, Kansas City, Missouri.

Date: 
1922

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.