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Letter from Harry S. Truman in Independence, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his plans for the next two weeks and his recent work making payrolls and salary cuts.

Date: 
May 1st 1933

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Independence, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and with county matters, saying that, "The sheriff has... closed the Independence jail. He thinks he'll cripple the road work. I'm not sorry he closed the jail because we don't need two and it will give me an excuse to cut some more expense."

Date: 
May 3rd 1933

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Baltimore in Kansas City, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and with county matters, saying that, "...the papers tried to start a row between me and the Sheriff. I don't want to start any row but I am going to finish one. He is out on a limb, and I am going to saw it off a little at a time."

Date: 
May 3rd 1933

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Robidoux in St. Joseph, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. On the eve of his forty-ninth birthday, Truman reflects to Bess that, "Politics should make a thief... and a pessimist of anyone, but I don't believe I'm any of them and if I can get the Kansas City courthouse done without scandal no other judge will have done as much, and then maybe I can retire as collector..."

Date: 
May 7th 1933

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Kansas City, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and his Jackson County Courthouse proposal to Conrad Mann, Henry F. McElroy, and Ruby Garrett.

Date: 
May 9th 1933

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Claridge in Saint Louis, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and his on Jackson County Courthouse proposal. After the courthouse is complete, Truman exclaims that, "...I can probably retire to a quiet job and enjoy life a little bit with my family. Not that I'm not enjoying it now but it is sometimes pretty hard on head and nerves."

Date: 
May 11th 1933

Letter from Harry S. Truman at Camp Pike near Little Rock, Arkansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman reacts to a clipping and a copy of the Independence Examiner, in which he says, "That letter from that old maid stenographer was just what you'd expect from a rabid dog. They tried me and convicted the county court without a hearing. If I'd opened up on the delegation as I should have, they'd have all been in jail for contempt."

Date: 
August 21st 1933

Letter from Harry S. Truman at Camp Pike near Little Rock, Arkansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his free time at Camp Pike and his meeting with Arkansas ex-governor Charles Hillman Brough, "who is a friend of Pendergast's and who was very pleased to see me when he found I knew him."

Date: 
August 26th 1933

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Governor Clinton in New York City to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his arrival and evening in the city. He then comments on his new prospects, saying that, "I'm not so sure I care as much for this proposed job as I thought I was going to. There'll be almost as many rocks heaved at me as there are now. But I'll look into it."

Date: 
January 1st 1934

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Willard Hotel in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and on his new prospects, saying that, "Tomorrow I'm to see Senator Clark and Mr. Burr and the rest and really make up my mind on what I'm to do."

Date: 
January 2nd 1934

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and on the flattery he receives from his colleagues: "The Senators all pretended to miss me and were very cordial to me-so was the Vice President. He appreciated my contribution so much he wouldn't even open it."

Date: 
June 18th 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman tells Bess of his meeting with President Roosevelt, Bennett C. Clark, and Clarence Cannon concerning relief for flood victims. Truman adds that, "I had a chance to tell Mr. Roosevelt what I thought of Mr. Mitchell. He very readily agreed with me."

Date: 
June 19th 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides insight on his public speaking, saying that, "You also know it's a chore for me to write a speech and I won't let anybody else do it. You remember Harvey would be so mad at me in the campaign because I wouldn't say what he wrote"

Date: 
June 25th 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and expresses his simple desire to be a businessman in a small town. He then recounts a dinner meeting with other Senators, including Joseph F. Guffey. Truman exclaims that, "He has a desire to be a Senate boss and since I don't like Pennsylvania anyway it wasn't hard for me to be against him. He tried to get Tom P. [Pendergast] to bring pressure on me about his real bill and Tom told me about it."

Date: 
June 26th 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman writes of their sixteenth anniversary with self-reflection and ambition, commenting that, "I am hoping to make a reputation as a Senator,... but you'll have to put up with a lot if I do it because I won't sell influence and I'm perfectly willing to be cussed if I'm right."

Date: 
June 28th 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then candidly comments on Missouri politics, saying that, "Paul Dillon is all worried about the St. Louis situation and Matt Murray. They are in the midst of a big fight down there. Igor and the Mayor are fighting and I can't worry much."

Date: 
July 1st 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then candidly comments on his nepotism, saying that, "If I made everybody I've gotten jobs for since 1927 pay me by the month as Bulger used to, we'd have a nice tidy sum to the leeward every month, but I'm just a d.f. I guess I can't take it that way."

Date: 
July 3rd 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this particularly candid letter, Truman updates Bess on the politics of Missouri and the nation, saying that "Pendergast hasn't made up his mind yet who will be governor. He'll announce it sometime soon. If the man is smart and politically minded he can say who Clark's successor will be and can deliver the 1940 delegation at the national convention."

Date: 
July 23rd 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this candid letter, Truman informs Bess that he intends to travel in secret to New York to meet with Tom Pendergast.

Date: 
July 24th 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel New Yorker in New York City to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this candid letter, Truman updates Bess on his travel to New York to meet with Tom Pendergast and provides an explanation for his visit: "Charlie Howell was in to see me and I wanted to get to the boss first so that's why I'm here. He... wanted to announce for governor when he gets back. That'll split Clark and T.J. sure I believe."

Date: 
July 28th 1935

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.