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Letter from Harry S. Truman at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. Truman describes his attraction to the military, then says, "You be a good girl and I'll be a good boy. I have been. I haven't had a thing to drink nor have I drawn a single card."

Date: 
July 21st 1923

Letter from Harry S. Truman at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman comments briefly on Kansas City politics: "I see that the Journal is still having a pick at the County Court. If Mr. Dickey had gotten his streets accepted he'd have been pleased with the operation of the court."

Date: 
July 22nd 1923

Letter from Harry S. Truman at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman comments that he is getting in shape while at Fort Leavenworth and exclaims, "I'll be able to lick all the rabbits and the Kansas City Journal too when I get home."

Date: 
July 25th 1923

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Connor in Joplin, Missouri to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman describes his trip to Joplin with Jimmy (James M.) Pendergast.

Date: 
August 18th 1924

Letter from Harry S. Truman at Fort Riley, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman recounts his conversation with the general (presumably of the United States Army Reserve), saying that, "He always kids me about my political career and I tell him if there weren't politicians to run the government, he would not be a brigadier general. That usually stops the conversation...".

Date: 
July 7th 1925

Letter from Harry S. Truman at Fort Riley, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman speaks candidly about fashion with Bess: "Say, if you want your hair bobbed so badly, go on and get it done. I want you to be happy regardless of what I think about it."

Date: 
July 9th 1925

Letter from Harry S. Truman at Fort Riley, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. This letter reveals his growing association with Tom Pendergast. Truman says, "I wonder if you would call up Buck and ask him to see Tom and get Tom to request Reed to pay me a visit. I'd be sitting on top of the moon if that could be done and Col. A.J.E. would have a spasm."

Date: 
July 6th 1926

Letter from Harry S. Truman at Fort Riley, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess of his United States Army Reserve duties and leisure time, joking that, "There are lots of politicians here. We have a great time trying to get our campaign funds out of the poker game."

Date: 
July 12th 1926

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Worthington Hotel in Herington, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman describes some of the men in power in Herington including the postmaster: "His name is Dave Naill and he is considered an authority on Republican politics in Kansas. He's got Tom [Pendergast] backed off the boards as a boss."

Date: 
November 8th 1926

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Great Bend, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman elaborates on the hospitality he is receiving in Great Bend, saying that, "This is almost like campaigning for President except that the people are making promises to me instead of the other way around."

Date: 
November 9th 1926

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Dodge City, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman describes the geography of southwest central Kansas, and exclaims, "...from the look of things we... will have all the cities in this neighborhood pulling for our National Old Trails..."

Date: 
November 10th 1926

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Dodge City, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his campaign for a National Old Trails Road and State Highway for Kansas.

Date: 
November 10th 1926

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Gibbons in Dayton, Ohio to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his travel east to Dayton and then speaks about the newly erected Liberty Memorial: "...Will Rogers says it looks like a silo. Other people have the right slant on R.A. Long's monument to himself as well as us perverted people who only fought the war behind a gun."

Date: 
November 15th 1926

Letter from Harry S. Truman aboard the National Limited (Baltimore & Ohio Railroad) to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess of his entitlements during the trip: "Davis suggests that I inform you of all the tricks we are entitled to on this Limited whether we use them or not; such as maid, hairdresser, barber shop & bath, secretary, valet, tailor etc. etc. ad infinitum."

Date: 
February 11th 1927

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Fort Riley, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his travel to Fort Riley and on his new entitlements there as a lieutenant colonel.

Date: 
July 10th 1927

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Fort Riley, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his increased influence at Fort Riley, remarking that, "I'm having a wonderful time doing a little political maneuvering. Also evening up some scores. The colonel listens to what I say and when I make suggestions about certain regular army officers he immediately flies into them... You see politics is never absent when I'm around."

Date: 
July 13th 1927

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Fort Riley, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and upcoming plans at Fort Riley. He then comments on local Kansas City politics: "I see the said court is functioning. The Star said they had ordered Koehler to pave Fairmount Ave. Had a letter from Vrooman saying the court was not taking any chances on anything but holding all doubtful matters for my return."

Date: 
July 15th 1927

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Fort Riley, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and complains about the post office system for not receiving a letter, saying that, "It's like everything else under this Republican Gov't I guess just a lack of efficiency." Truman also mentions Kansas City director of public works Matthew S. Murray.

Date: 
July 16th 1927

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Council Grove, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his travels and informs her of the how well he is being treated, saying that, "You should be along. I haven't spent a nickle [sic] and I can't. They won't let me[.] even the phone call was free."

Date: 
September 30th 1927

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel LaFayette in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day socializing and briefly comments on Kansas City politics, saying that, "I'm glad they are at last getting the bond business going. If we carry that, there'll be no stopping us from being a real court."

Date: 
April 19th 1928

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.