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Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on the political maneuvering of Maurice M. Milligan and Bennett C. Clark and mentions that "Then Canfil came in with a whole string of trouble which I got straightened out to some extent and now John Madden and R.R. Brewster are here on a parole for Pendergast."

Date: 
September 25th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman provides his personal account of the Grand Lodge of Missouri Convention in Saint Louis, Missouri and his successful election to Deputy Master. Truman says, "If my friends hadn't put forth such an effort for me I'd have told 'em to go to hell with the office - and I almost did anyway. I'm glad now I didn't."

Date: 
September 28th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Carroll Arms Hotel in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then comments on his present association with the Kansas City political machine: "The terrible things done by the high ups in K.C. will be a lead weight to me from now on, and I've just go to win anyhow and make 'em like it."

Date: 
October 1st 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his speech he gave the previous day and on some of the people he interacted with: "Reverend Foster is the most influential preacher in southeast Missouri and he spent the whole time getting all the facts on Pendergast and Stark. I made lots of hay I'll tell you. But it was hard work. They nearly pulled me to pieces."

Date: 
October 9th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman discusses a few minor personal matters and then makes a jeer at Missouri governor Lloyd C. Stark, saying, "Well if a counterfeit like Mr. Stark can fool the people, they'll deserve what they get."

Date: 
October 10th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman discusses a few minor personal matters and mentions his activities from the previous day: "...Joe Guffey and I studied the various strains of thoroughbred horses at Laurel (in the interest of agriculture you understand). I lost most of my Saturday's winnings but we had a grand time..."

Date: 
October 19th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his trip to Chicago and his breakfast with Leo Packer, Mr. Byers, and Dick Adams. Truman says, "Dick you know was a Republican alderman in Kansas City. He said he is for me and expected to do all he could."

Date: 
October 24th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his latest political maneuvers with Bennett C. Clark: "Mr. Clark and I have had a time trying to get to the W.P.A. office to recommend a man for [Matthew S.] Murray's place. It looks as if they would really put poor old Murray in the jug."

Date: 
October 25th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and on his endeavor to select the new Kansas City W.P.A. Director: "It looks as if I'm going to get the W.P.A. Director I want. They are inclined to take Harry Easley. He's Alvin Hatton's brother-in-law and my friend and he'll make a good one."

Date: 
October 26th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his endeavor to select the new Kansas City W.P.A. Director and then comments about those affiliated with the Pendergast machine: "Mr. [Matthew S.] Murray, Mr. [Henry F.] McElroy, Mr. [Otto P.] Higgins, and even Mr. [Tom] P. himself probably would pay all the ill-gotten loot they took for my position and clear conscience."

Date: 
October 27th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Carroll Arms Hotel in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his recent travels including a meeting with Roy A. Roberts, president and editor of The Kansas City Star. Truman says that "Both Mr. Stark & Mr. Milligan were in Roy Roberts room when Charlie and I made the rounds and they both looked and acted like men without a country."

Date: 
December 9th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman finds himself disconnected with Kansas City, but not by choice. Truman says that "It is a miserable state of affairs when a man dreads showing up in his home town because all his friends are either in jail or about to go there... The Star and even Willie never fail to emphasize my friendship with people whom they think may be a detriment politically to me."

Date: 
December 15th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman discusses his 1940 campaign for Senate reelection: "I wished then I'd never made the fight. But it was a good fight... I hope some good fact-finder will make a record of that campaign. It will be history someday."

Date: 
August 9th 1940

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his morning, including a meeting with Boyle Clark. When inquired about Missouri Governor Lloyd C. Stark, Truman said to Boyle Clark, "... I hadn't and didn't want to hear from the S.O.B. and that so far as I am concerned I didn't give a damn what he did or intended to do..."

Date: 
August 21st 1940

Letter from Harry S. Truman to his fiancée Bess Wallace while Truman was at Camp La Baholle, near Verdun, France. Truman describes his life's dreams and expectations following the war, including his desire to be a farmer. He states, "I've almost come to the conclusion that it's not intended for me ever to be very rich, nor very poor, and I am about convinced that that will be about the happiest state a man can be."

Date: 
December 14th 1918

Letter from Harry S. Truman to his fiancée Bess Wallace while Truman was at Camp La Baholle, near Verdun, France. Truman gives insight into his personality as a leader, stating that, "If there's one thing I've always hated in a man it is to see him take his spite out on someone who couldn't talk back to him.".

Date: 
January 11th 1919

Letter from Harry S. Truman to his fiancée Bess Wallace while Truman was at Camp La Baholle, near Verdun, France. Truman shows humility as he urges Bess to not inform others of his letter of commendation, stating that, "There's not one of us who have done anything that any other one of us could not and would not have done if the opportunity had offered."

Date: 
January 19th 1919

Letter from Harry S. Truman to his fiancée Bess Wallace while Truman was in France near Bar-le-Duc. Truman asserts his intention to marry Bess as soon as he returns from Europe, even though he has no money, stating that, "I haven't any place to go but home and I'm busted financially but I love you as madly as a man can and I'll find all the other things."

Date: 
February 18th 1919

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Robidoux in St. Joseph, Missouri to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In the letter, Truman mentions sharing his hotel room with James Pendergast during an American Legion State Convention. Truman comments that James is, "a nice boy and as smart as the old man he's named for."

Date: 
September 20th 1921

Letter from Harry S. Truman at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman reveals his inclination towards military service, stating that, "I am going to have to write orders for a whole division today, and believe me it's a real job. I won't have time to think of any politicians or jobs or roads either for the balance of the week."

Date: 
July 19th 1923

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.