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Displaying 1 - 13 of 13

Senator Harry S. Truman, Thomas J. Pendergast, James P. Aylward, James Farley, N. G. Robertson, and David Fitzgerald at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Date: 
June 24th 1936

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman expresses his distaste for social functions, commenting that "I don't do things for people for a reward, if I did I ought to be rich. I do it because I like to do it, but if they just keep harping on it I get sick of it."

Date: 
January 4th 1936

Letter from Harry S. Truman at The Majestic in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. Written while Truman was attending the 1936 Democratic National Convention, Truman comments on several small details concerning the convention, including the fact that "Mrs. [Bennett C.] Clark was there and sat with the delegation--quite a concession as she had a box seat on the stage. I was given one for you but gave it to T.J. [Tom Pendergast]."

Date: 
June 25th 1936

Letter from Harry S. Truman at The Majestic in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman gives Bess his opinion of the 1936 Democratic National Convention and mentions that James M. Pendergast was present. He also makes note that the date marks his seventeenth anniversary with Bess.

Date: 
June 28th 1936

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen describes in detail an investigation by Harvey L. Duncan concerning an alleged theft of an interstate shipment of liquor. Kitchen warns against a conspiracy charge, which would reflect poorly on the Kansas City organization. Thus, he suggests that any suspect be tried separately, and not as co-conspirators in a large scheme. In order to do this, Kitchen recommends Truman has Bennett C. Clark call Maurice M. Milligan and request that Milligan prosecutes violators separately.

Date: 
May 12th 1936

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman confirms receipt of Kitchen's letter concerning an alleged theft of an interstate shipment of liquor and Harvey L. Duncan's investigation of the same. Truman cryptically and succinctly responds saying, "I am looking into the matter as carefully as I possibly can."

Date: 
May 14th 1936

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen provides supplementary information on investigation by Harvey L. Duncan concerning an alleged theft of an interstate shipment of liquor. Kitchen provides more intel on Duncan, his plans, and on John T. Burkett, a colleague of Duncan's that "is building a fire under him."

Date: 
May 14th 1936

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen requests Truman's help in confirming his sister, Elizabeth Kitchen Black, as Postmaster of Mound City, Missouri. Kitchen also requests an autographed portrait of Truman for Kitchen to hang in his office.

Date: 
May 8th 1936

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman informs Kitchen he is sending Kitchen the requested autographed portrait of himself for Kitchen to hang in his office.

Date: 
May 15th 1936

Letter from Thomas McGee to Harry S. Truman in which McGee informs Truman that McGee's son-in-law, John Lillis, was let go from his job at the Federal Housing Administration. He reminds Truman that James P. Aylward and James M. Pendergast had recommended Lillis for an appointment by Truman, and that Lillis was his only relative with a political appointment. McGee also reminds Truman of Thomas J. Pendergast's upcoming travel in which Truman will meet with him.

Date: 
April 6th 1936

Letter from Thomas McGee to Harry S. Truman in which McGee discloses his efforts to get Pendergast and James P. Aylward to help re-appoint his son-in-law, John Lillis, to the Federal Housing Administration. McGee says that Pendergast may seek the help of Truman and Bennett C. Clark in this matter. He also informs Truman of his meeting with William Boyle and J. J. Pryor of Boyle-Pryor Construction Company.

Date: 
April 16th 1936

Letter from Thomas McGee to Harry S. Truman in which McGee expresses his appreciation in Truman's interest to re-appoint McGee's son-in-law, John Lillis, at the Federal Housing Administation. McGee also comments on Casimir Welch's funeral.

Date: 
April 27th 1936

Letter from Harry S. Truman to Thomas McGee in which Truman states that McGee's son-in-law, John Lillis, should soon be re-appointed at the Federal Housing Administration. Truman then expresses his sorrow for the death of James A. Shannon, a Kansas City lawyer who passed away on May 16, 1936.

Date: 
May 22nd 1936
KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.