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Bryce B. Smith, Mayor of Kansas City, Missouri, speaking over KMBC Radio.

Date: 
June 11th 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and on the flattery he receives from his colleagues: "The Senators all pretended to miss me and were very cordial to me-so was the Vice President. He appreciated my contribution so much he wouldn't even open it."

Date: 
June 18th 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman tells Bess of his meeting with President Roosevelt, Bennett C. Clark, and Clarence Cannon concerning relief for flood victims. Truman adds that, "I had a chance to tell Mr. Roosevelt what I thought of Mr. Mitchell. He very readily agreed with me."

Date: 
June 19th 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides insight on his public speaking, saying that, "You also know it's a chore for me to write a speech and I won't let anybody else do it. You remember Harvey would be so mad at me in the campaign because I wouldn't say what he wrote"

Date: 
June 25th 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and expresses his simple desire to be a businessman in a small town. He then recounts a dinner meeting with other Senators, including Joseph F. Guffey. Truman exclaims that, "He has a desire to be a Senate boss and since I don't like Pennsylvania anyway it wasn't hard for me to be against him. He tried to get Tom P. [Pendergast] to bring pressure on me about his real bill and Tom told me about it."

Date: 
June 26th 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman writes of their sixteenth anniversary with self-reflection and ambition, commenting that, "I am hoping to make a reputation as a Senator,... but you'll have to put up with a lot if I do it because I won't sell influence and I'm perfectly willing to be cussed if I'm right."

Date: 
June 28th 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then candidly comments on Missouri politics, saying that, "Paul Dillon is all worried about the St. Louis situation and Matt Murray. They are in the midst of a big fight down there. Igor and the Mayor are fighting and I can't worry much."

Date: 
July 1st 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then candidly comments on his nepotism, saying that, "If I made everybody I've gotten jobs for since 1927 pay me by the month as Bulger used to, we'd have a nice tidy sum to the leeward every month, but I'm just a d.f. I guess I can't take it that way."

Date: 
July 3rd 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this particularly candid letter, Truman updates Bess on the politics of Missouri and the nation, saying that "Pendergast hasn't made up his mind yet who will be governor. He'll announce it sometime soon. If the man is smart and politically minded he can say who Clark's successor will be and can deliver the 1940 delegation at the national convention."

Date: 
July 23rd 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this candid letter, Truman informs Bess that he intends to travel in secret to New York to meet with Tom Pendergast.

Date: 
July 24th 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel New Yorker in New York City to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this candid letter, Truman updates Bess on his travel to New York to meet with Tom Pendergast and provides an explanation for his visit: "Charlie Howell was in to see me and I wanted to get to the boss first so that's why I'm here. He... wanted to announce for governor when he gets back. That'll split Clark and T.J. sure I believe."

Date: 
July 28th 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this candid letter, Truman updates Bess on his meeting with Tom Pendergast in New York, saying that "Pendergast was as pleased to see me as if I'd been young Jim. We talked for three hours about everything under the sun. Discarded a couple of prominent candidates for governor..."

Date: 
July 29th 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Governor Clinton in New York City to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this candid letter, Truman updates Bess on his morning and his trip to New York, saying that "[John N. Garner, Nathan L. Bachman, and William J. Bulow] had been to see T.J. [Tom Pendergast] and I must try to find out what they did tomorrow."

Date: 
August 10th 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Continental in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his visit with Tom Pendergast in New York, saying that he "... had a most pleasant visit with T. J. P. He [Pendergast] was as pleased to see me as a ten-year-old kid to see his lost pal."

Date: 
August 11th 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and upcoming travel plans. He then candidly comments that "Pendergast wants to see me and Clark and I'm of the opinion that everything will be settled when we see him. Wouldn't the papers give something to know that?"

Date: 
August 23rd 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his past week and of the telegrams he received that morning, one from Tom Pendergast "recommending a good for nothing bird for a job and I won't recommend him."

Date: 
December 12th 1935

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman responds to Kitchen concerning the replacement of Neal Williams as Veterans' Placement Officer for the State of Missouri. Truman says that he will try to place Kitchen's recommendation in the position once it is open.

Date: 
August 14th 1935

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses Franklin D. Roosevelt's unpopularity among World War veterans. Kitchen suggests that the President must attend the American Legion National Convention in St. Louis that year if he intends to visit the following year during his reelection campaign.

Date: 
August 14th 1935

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman responds to Kitchen suggestion that President Roosevelt attends the 1935 American Legion National Convention in St. Louis. Truman agrees that it would be wise for the President to attend and will try to convince him to do so.

Date: 
August 17th 1935

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen encourages Truman to give K. E. Long of Newburg, Missouri a job under Mr. Murray. Kitchen finds Long to be "well connected politically in Phelps County and I am, therefore, extremely anxious that he be placed on the payroll at the earliest possible date."

Date: 
August 9th 1935

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.