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Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his travel and then provides information on the Missouri public's current opinion of Governor Lloyd C. Stark: "There are a number of letters from all over the state giving the governor a real dressing down. One calls him Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde-for T.J.P. to get elected and against him to get headlines."

Date: 
July 5th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his travel and speaks about Kansas City Bar Association President Henry Depping: "Depping is a Republican and one of the inner circle in K.C. He told me he'd try to get enough Republican candidates into the Senatorial race so they wouldn't vote in my primary."

Date: 
July 22nd 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides his opinion on Maurice M. Milligan and Lloyd C. Stark: "I don't want Milligan to run unless he and Stark run together. That would be too good."

Date: 
July 24th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides details on Clark and Truman's political maneuvering: "Clark said he was to see Tuck [Jacob] Milligan yesterday and that he'd rub a little salt on Stark. He thinks maybe we can get 'em all in the race."

Date: 
July 27th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess of his upcoming plans and comments on the newspapers' opinion of Lloyd C. Stark': "The K.C. Star, the Post-Dispatch, and the Star-Times in St. Louis are giving Mr. Stark dig after dig. It looks as if their hero has feet of clay (or rotten apples)."

Date: 
August 1st 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then recounts one man's opinion of the Missouri political climate: "Had a letter from J. John Gillis this morning in which he said the Dems in Mo couldn't win unless Stark was nominated for V.P. He's a crazy Republican lawyer in K.C."

Date: 
August 6th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his visit with Franklin D. Roosevelt and their discussion about Lloyd C. Stark: "Went to see the President about a bill and he insisted on talking Mo. politics and telling me what a funny Governor we have. He didn't say phony but that's what he meant."

Date: 
August 8th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman comments on Lloyd C. Stark running for the Senate while still the governor of Missouri. Truman then reflects on his past influence in Kansas City: "My patronage troubles were the result of the rotten situation in Kansas City and also the jealous disposition of my colleague. While the President is unreliable, the things he's stood for are, in my opinion, best for the country, and jobs should not interfere with general principles."

Date: 
September 24th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman provides his personal account of the Grand Lodge of Missouri Convention in Saint Louis, Missouri and his successful election to Deputy Master. Truman says, "If my friends hadn't put forth such an effort for me I'd have told 'em to go to hell with the office - and I almost did anyway. I'm glad now I didn't."

Date: 
September 28th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Carroll Arms Hotel in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then comments on his present association with the Kansas City political machine: "The terrible things done by the high ups in K.C. will be a lead weight to me from now on, and I've just go to win anyhow and make 'em like it."

Date: 
October 1st 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his speech he gave the previous day and on some of the people he interacted with: "Reverend Foster is the most influential preacher in southeast Missouri and he spent the whole time getting all the facts on Pendergast and Stark. I made lots of hay I'll tell you. But it was hard work. They nearly pulled me to pieces."

Date: 
October 9th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman discusses a few minor personal matters and then makes a jeer at Missouri governor Lloyd C. Stark, saying, "Well if a counterfeit like Mr. Stark can fool the people, they'll deserve what they get."

Date: 
October 10th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Carroll Arms Hotel in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his recent travels including a meeting with Roy A. Roberts, president and editor of The Kansas City Star. Truman says that "Both Mr. Stark & Mr. Milligan were in Roy Roberts room when Charlie and I made the rounds and they both looked and acted like men without a country."

Date: 
December 9th 1939

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen informs Truman that he spoke with Col. Bob Walton of Armstrong, Missouri. After explaining Truman's side of the story concerning the WPA issue, Kitchen reports that Walton agrees with Truman, but is still worried about the Democratic party in the 1940 campaign.

Date: 
March 25th 1939

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman states he is glad that Walton and Kitchen had a agreeable discussion concerning the WPA controversy. He then comments on how rural carrier positions are filled, including the one currently open in Ash Grove, Missouri.

Date: 
March 27th 1939

Letter from J. W. Thompson to Governor Lloyd C. Stark concerning social security pensions and Thompson's view of Missouri politicians. He admits he does not like Bennett C. Clark, but as an anti-Pendergast voter, Thompson believes "Clark is better than Truman at his best."

Date: 
May 31st 1939
KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.