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Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides the latest information concerning Kansas City and Missouri politics: "I missed a call from [Joseph B.] Shannon... Jim P. [Pendergast] said he hoped I'd keep him here but I'm glad he's going home. He says [Lloyd C.] Stark will run against [Bennett C.] Clark and not against me."

Date: 
November 22nd 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides some candid information concerning Kansas City and Missouri politics: "…[Bennett C.] Clark has definitely lined up with the Boss [Tom Pendergast] you see. He and Maurice Milligan almost came to blows the last time they met and now the Pres and [Lloyd C.] Stark are thinking of running him for Senator against Clark."

Date: 
November 28th 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides details on Clark and Truman's political maneuvering: "Clark said he was to see Tuck [Jacob] Milligan yesterday and that he'd rub a little salt on Stark. He thinks maybe we can get 'em all in the race."

Date: 
July 27th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his visit with Franklin D. Roosevelt and their discussion about Lloyd C. Stark: "Went to see the President about a bill and he insisted on talking Mo. politics and telling me what a funny Governor we have. He didn't say phony but that's what he meant."

Date: 
August 8th 1939

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses the 1940 election and public reception to Maurice M. Milligan's campaign against Truman. Kitchen then details information he received concerning a Securities and Exchange Commission investigation of Andy Murphy and the Union Electric Company.

Date: 
May 17th 1940

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses a number of Missouri political matters including possible state chairman replacements. He also provides intelligence concerning a secret political meeting held in the Lake of the Ozarks, Missouri. In attendance were Lloyd C. Stark, J. D. James, William E. Kemp, Edgar Shook, Andrew Murphy, et al..

Date: 
August 19th 1941

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen concedes that it is not yet time to reorganize the Missouri Democratic Party. Kitchen then provides intelligence concerning Lloyd C. Stark and the recent Women's Democratic Clubs convention in Jefferson City, Missouri. He then discusses a proposed Democratic "harmony" dinner in Jefferson City and mentions Jim Aylward's recent comments towards Truman.

Date: 
October 23rd 1941

Southeastern Missouri newspaper clipping reporting on Governor Lloyd C. Stark's campaign announcement for U.S. Senator of Missouri. The author favors Senator Harry S. Truman for reelection as he is believed to have a better chance of beating a Republican nominee over his Democratic rivals Stark and Maurice M. Milligan. The author then paints a favorable portrait of Truman and tells the reader to not fear his association with Pendergast, saying, "Don't be foolish enough to vote against him [Truman] just because Tom Pendergast was for him.

Date: 
April 19th 1940

Letter from J. W. Thompson to Governor Lloyd C. Stark concerning social security pensions and Thompson's view of Missouri politicians. He admits he does not like Bennett C. Clark, but as an anti-Pendergast voter, Thompson believes "Clark is better than Truman at his best."

Date: 
May 31st 1939

Essay documenting the role Ralph E. Truman and Olive L. Truman played in the 1940 U.S. Senatorial campaign in Missouri. Olive describes how Governor Lloyd C. Stark asked for Ralph's support for Stark's senatorial campaign, as Stark had recently appointed Ralph to a General. After Ralph put his support towards the reelection of his cousin Senator Harry S. Truman, Stark attempted to have Ralph's status as General revoked. In response, Ralph, Olive, and Bennett C. Clark resolved to get another Democratic candidate to enter to decrease Stark's chance of nomination.

Date: 
July 3rd 1964
KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.