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Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides some candid information concerning Kansas City and Missouri politics: "…[Bennett C.] Clark has definitely lined up with the Boss [Tom Pendergast] you see. He and Maurice Milligan almost came to blows the last time they met and now the Pres and [Lloyd C.] Stark are thinking of running him for Senator against Clark."

Date: 
November 28th 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides his opinion on Maurice M. Milligan and Lloyd C. Stark: "I don't want Milligan to run unless he and Stark run together. That would be too good."

Date: 
July 24th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on the political maneuvering of Maurice M. Milligan and Bennett C. Clark and mentions that "Then Canfil came in with a whole string of trouble which I got straightened out to some extent and now John Madden and R.R. Brewster are here on a parole for Pendergast."

Date: 
September 25th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman provides his personal account of the Grand Lodge of Missouri Convention in Saint Louis, Missouri and his successful election to Deputy Master. Truman says, "If my friends hadn't put forth such an effort for me I'd have told 'em to go to hell with the office - and I almost did anyway. I'm glad now I didn't."

Date: 
September 28th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Carroll Arms Hotel in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his recent travels including a meeting with Roy A. Roberts, president and editor of The Kansas City Star. Truman says that "Both Mr. Stark & Mr. Milligan were in Roy Roberts room when Charlie and I made the rounds and they both looked and acted like men without a country."

Date: 
December 9th 1939

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen describes in detail an investigation by Harvey L. Duncan concerning an alleged theft of an interstate shipment of liquor. Kitchen warns against a conspiracy charge, which would reflect poorly on the Kansas City organization. Thus, he suggests that any suspect be tried separately, and not as co-conspirators in a large scheme. In order to do this, Kitchen recommends Truman has Bennett C. Clark call Maurice M. Milligan and request that Milligan prosecutes violators separately.

Date: 
May 12th 1936

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen provides supplementary information on investigation by Harvey L. Duncan concerning an alleged theft of an interstate shipment of liquor. Kitchen provides more intel on Duncan, his plans, and on John T. Burkett, a colleague of Duncan's that "is building a fire under him."

Date: 
May 14th 1936

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen suggests a way in which Truman can put in a replacement for Maurice M. Milligan as U.S. attorney at Kansas City. Kitchen proposes that the President could appoint a new attorney of Truman's choosing, but keep Milligan as a special prosecutor for the Kansas City voter fraud cases. By doing so, Truman can control the placement without the Kansas City newspapers accusing him of trying to suppress the prosecution of voter fraud.

Date: 
December 7th 1937

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman responds to Kitchen's suggestion of a way for Truman to put in a replacement for Maurice M. Milligan as U.S. attorney at Kansas City.

Date: 
December 10th 1937

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses the 1940 election and public reception to Maurice M. Milligan's campaign against Truman. Kitchen then details information he received concerning a Securities and Exchange Commission investigation of Andy Murphy and the Union Electric Company.

Date: 
May 17th 1940

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman replies to Kitchen's letter concerning Milligan's campaign and a Securities and Exchange Commission investigation. He also inquires if Charlie Carr sent the required documents in his proposed appointment to Judge of the Eight Circuit Court of Appeals.

Date: 
May 30th 1940

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Truman comments on the difficulties of the primary campaign and responds to Kitchens suggestions on the fall campaign.

Date: 
August 15th 1940

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses suitable candidates for state chairman and other details for Truman's 1940 Senate campaign. In his postscript he urges Truman to attend the American Legion convention on Labor Day in Sedalia, Missouri.

Date: 
August 20th 1940

Harry S. Truman's final draft of his statement on the reappointment of Maurice Milligan as U.S. Attorney. Truman strongly opposes Milligan's reappointment because he finds him to be morally and professionally unqualified. Specifically, Truman takes issue with Milligan's selection of the petit jury in the 1936 election voter fraud cases where no residents of Jackson County or acquaintances of the same were allowed to take part. Truman comments on this saying, "I say to this Senate, Mr.

Date: 
1938

Pamphlet is support of Maurice M. Milligan for U.S. Senator of Missouri. Milligan ran in opposition to current Senator Harry S. Truman and lost the primary because the anti-Pendergast vote was split between Milligan and Lloyd C. Stark.

Date: 
1940

Letter from Rufus B. Burrus to the Kansas City Star Editorial Editor in which Burrus responds to an article entitled, "Truman Servant of Pendergast". Burrus believes statements in the article to be untrue and addresses allegations of voter fraud in connection with Harry S. Truman. He also addresses Truman's relationship with Thomas J. Pendergast.

Date: 
June 25th 1940

Southeastern Missouri newspaper clipping reporting on Governor Lloyd C. Stark's campaign announcement for U.S. Senator of Missouri. The author favors Senator Harry S. Truman for reelection as he is believed to have a better chance of beating a Republican nominee over his Democratic rivals Stark and Maurice M. Milligan. The author then paints a favorable portrait of Truman and tells the reader to not fear his association with Pendergast, saying, "Don't be foolish enough to vote against him [Truman] just because Tom Pendergast was for him.

Date: 
April 19th 1940

Essay documenting the role Ralph E. Truman and Olive L. Truman played in the 1940 U.S. Senatorial campaign in Missouri. Olive describes how Governor Lloyd C. Stark asked for Ralph's support for Stark's senatorial campaign, as Stark had recently appointed Ralph to a General. After Ralph put his support towards the reelection of his cousin Senator Harry S. Truman, Stark attempted to have Ralph's status as General revoked. In response, Ralph, Olive, and Bennett C. Clark resolved to get another Democratic candidate to enter to decrease Stark's chance of nomination.

Date: 
July 3rd 1964
KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.