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Photograph of the dedication of a monument at the site of the first Shawnee Indian Mission, located near the former town of Turner in Kansas City, Kansas. Miss Sue Wornall, the great-great-granddaughter of mission founder Thomas Johnson, poses in front of the monument itself, with Bishop Eugene R. Hendrix at the left of the image and Judge Nelson Case at the right. The text of the marker reads "This monument marks the site of the mission house erected for the benefit of the Shawnee Indians by Reverend Thomas Johnson, of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in 1830.

Date: 
June 26th 1917

Photograph of the dedication of a monument at the site of the first Shawnee Indian Mission, located near the former town of Turner in Kansas City, Kansas. Julia Stinson, a Shawnee descendent born in 1934 a half-mile east of the site, is being blessed by Bishop Eugene R. Hendrix on the right and Bishop William O. Shepard on the left. Mrs. Stinson helped to confirm the mission site, and delivered a speech at the dedication. Thomas Johnson later relocated the mission to Johnson County.

Date: 
June 26th 1917

Photograph of the dedication of a monument at the site of the first Shawnee Indian Mission, located near the former town of Turner in Kansas City, Kansas. Thomas Johnson later relocated the mission to Johnson County. Unidentified men and women are pictured near a tent and American flag.

Date: 
June 26th 1917

A panoramic photograph showing a fire at the stockyards in Kansas City, Missouri. Many cattle were killed.

Date: 
October 16th 1917

This map of Wyandotte County, KS, shows the land owners on sections in townships 10-12 south, and ranges 23-25 east. It includes the towns of Quindaro, Shawnee, Kansas City, Edwardsville, and Bonner Springs. In addition, roads, railroads, electric railways, schools, churches, cemeteries, streams, and rivers are marked on the map. Railroads in the area include: Kansas City, Kaw Valley & V.R.R.R.

Date: 
December 23rd 1918

Interne certificate awarded to Karl A. Menninger from the General Hospital of Kansas City, Missouri. Dr. Menninger was a psychiatrist who later founded the Menninger Clinic in Topeka, Kansas.

Date: 
July 5th 1918

Set of 3 hand-drawn ink-on-linen maps showing the harbor lines for the Kansas River at Kansas City, Kansas, from Turkey Creek to the Argentine Wagon Bridge, showing U. S. Harbor lines, and Kaw Valley Drainage Districts modified lines. Prepared by the Chief Engineer, Drainage Board, for the Kaw Valley Drainage District. It includes the locations of manufacturers along the river.

Date: 
January 4th 1919

Photograph of an exterior view of a house at 4156 Cambridge Street, in the Hanover Heights neighborhood of Kansas City, Kansas circa 1920.

Date: 
1920

Photograph of a grain elevator by a railroad in the Argentine industrial district of Kansas City, Kansas. On the image "C.A Fellows Contractor Topeka, Kansas 1921" is written.

Date: 
1921

Photograph of men standing on the James Street Station Platform, Kansas City, Kansas before the last streetcar to pass over the elevated street railway, also known as the "L" structure. This streetcar line connected the West Bottoms with downtown Kansas City, Missouri via the 8th Street Tunnel. It was closed that day after 35 years of use as the "L" structure on the west side of the route was in disrepair. Businessmen demanded repairs and five years later it was re-opened for use.

Date: 
December 29th 1922

Photograph of Fred Harvey staff waitresses, the Harvey Girls, at Union Station in Kansas City, Missouri. The young women served meals to travelers at the Fred Harvey hotels and restaurants along the Atchison, Topeka, & Santa Fe Railway line.

Date: 
1922

Five-page telegram from the Mexican Consulate in Kansas City, Missouri to Governor Jonathan M. Davis in Topeka, Kansas. The consul expresses concern over a report of four Mexican boys being barred from the Major Hudson School in the Rosedale community of Kansas City, Kansas, because other students threaten to stop attending classes if the Mexican children are allowed to attend. He says a mob of two hundred children and adults shouted abusive language until a teacher, Margaret Jones, called the police. The consul asks that the governor investigate the situation.

Date: 
September 19th 1924

Letter from Mr. C. Miller, secretary to Governor Ben Paul, to Kansas state representative S. F. Paul, acknowledging receipt of his earlier letter and promising "personal attention and consideration" from Paul to come.

Date: 
December 18th 1924

Letter from Kansas state representative S. F. Paul to Governor Ben Paulen regarding a bill proposing a reduction in State Grain Department fees for the inspection and weighing of grains. Paul argues that this change isn't good for Paul or for Kansas farmers, as much of the grain originates from out of state and thus the bill decreases fees largely for non-residents. Paul writes that the "Kansas Farmer is well satisfied with the present charges for inspecting and weighing."

Date: 
December 16th 1924

Blueprint map of the Fairfax Industrial District in Kansas City, Kansas, showing Union Pacific Railroad facilities, tracks, and other properties, as well as depicting features of the Missouri and Kansas Rivers and mapping city streets and the rail lines of other companies. The map was created by the Union Pacific Chief Engineer's Office in Omaha, Nebraska.

Date: 
November 4th 1924

William Allen White standing next to a Dodge automobile in front of the Emporia Gazette newspaper office during his campaign for Kansas governor, during which he took a stand against the Ku Klux Klan.

Date: 
1924

Letter from the president, secretary, and chairman of the executive board of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to Kansas Governor Ben S. Paulen. The NAACP thanked Governor Paulen for not passing Senate Bill 269 known as the Ku Klux Klan bill. If passed, this bill would have allowed organizations such as the Ku Klux Klan to operate in Kansas without taking out a charter. Governor Paulen disagreed with the bill and discouraged its passing. The bill failed in the Kansas House of Representatives with 65 nays and 57 yeas.

Date: 
March 13th 1925

Letter from F. J. Peck, president and superintendent of Western University, to Governor Ben Paulen, regarding the removal of a Mr. Small and his replacement with Mr. Easter for a position at the university at the request of the Board of Administration and other issues of concern with the board and personnel.

Date: 
July 15th 1925

Letter from F. J. Peck, president and superintendent of Western University, to Governor Ben Paulen. Peck congratulates Paulen on the appointment of a Mrs. Childs, and looks forward to Paulen approving the university's new board of trustees.

Date: 
March 31st 1925

Letter from F. J. Peck, president and superintendent of Western University, to Governor Ben Paulen regarding Sgt. Walter B. Williams being "redetailed" to the school by the War Department as an instructor in Military Tactics and Science, and attributes this decision to the efforts of Senators Arthur Capper and Charles Curtis and Congressman Daniel R. Anthony. Peck also reports that the school has in its arsenal "one hundred and thirty high-powered rifles, six target guns and fifty thousand rounds of ammunition."

Date: 
July 14th 1925

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.