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Exterior photograph of the Major Clinic at 31st and Euclid. The clinic was owned and operated by Dr. Hermon S. Major and was a private facility devoted to the treatment of alcoholism.

Date: 
1937

Photograph of the reception room at Major Clinic. The clinic, owned and operated by Dr. Hermon S. Major, was a private facility devoted to the treatment of alcoholism.

Photograph of the patients' and employees' dining room at Major Clinic. The clinic, owned and operated by Dr. Hermon S. Major, was a private facility devoted to the treatment of alcoholism.

Photograph of the reception room of the female mental department at Major Clinic. The clinic, owned and operated by Dr. Hermon S. Major, was a private facility devoted to the treatment of alcoholism.

Photograph of a patients room with twin beds in the men's department at Major Clinic. The clinic, owned and operated by Dr. Hermon S. Major, was a private facility devoted to the treatment of alcoholism.

Photograph of a patient room in the ladies department at Major Clinic. The clinic, owned and operated by Dr. Hermon S. Major, was a private facility devoted to the treatment of alcoholism.

Interne certificate awarded to Karl A. Menninger from the General Hospital of Kansas City, Missouri. Dr. Menninger was a psychiatrist who later founded the Menninger Clinic in Topeka, Kansas.

Date: 
July 5th 1918

Biography of Hermon Samuel Major, M.D., including a family history, description of Dr. Major's early life, and his entrance into the Scarritt Collegiate Institute in Neosho, Missouri, where Will Rogers was a classmate. Major later boarded with Senator and Mrs. Thomas Benton, and began attending University Medical College in September, 1900. In 1912 he was appointed clinical director of State Hospital No.

A woman and her child in the railyard area where they lived. Railroad companies reused cars as housing for Mexican railroad workers, many of whom were recent immigrants could not find or afford more permanent housing.

A woman and her child outside of the boxcar where they lived. Railroad companies reused cars as housing for Mexican railroad workers, many of whom were recent immigrants could not find or afford more permanent housing.

Photograph of railroad cars used as housing for Mexican railroad workers. Many workers were recent immigrants could not find or afford more permanent housing, leading to railroad companies repurposing railcars into bunkhouses for their employees.

Photograph of people and vehicles outside the Guadalupe Center in Kansas City, Missouri's Westside neighborhood. The organization, founded in 1919, provided healthcare, education, and other services to the local Mexican immigrant population who had moved to Kansas City for jobs with the railroads and packing houses. The building pictured opened in 1936.

Photograph of students outside the Clara Barton School. The school served the Mexican community of Kansas City, Kansas, from the 1920s until it was damaged by flooding in 1951.

Photograph of a student costumed for a play at Clara Barton School. The school served the Mexican community of Kansas City, Kansas, from the 1920s until it was damaged by flooding in 1951.

Photograph and negative image of an exterior view of a house at 4146 Cambridge Street, in the Hanover Heights neighborhood of Kansas City, Kansas circa 1920.

Panoramic photograph and negative of employees of the Community Chest of Kansas City, Kansas. Community Chests were local charitable organizations, and later became known as United Way.

Photograph of an exterior view of a house at 4156 Cambridge Street, in the Hanover Heights neighborhood of Kansas City, Kansas circa 1920.

Date: 
1920

Photograph of a meeting of a Workers Alliance Lodge meeting. Identified attendees are Charles Northington wearing suspenders; John Waltz, the adult man at far left; and Earl Burnley, the man in a tie, third from right in the front row. Workers Alliance was a national organization of unemployed people who found relief through the Works Progress Administration jobs. The group became closely affiliated with the Communist Party, and lobbied for increased funding for the WPA. "Workers Alliance Dinner up our house" is written at the top of the photograph.

Negative image of an exterior view of a house at 4146 Cambridge Street, in the Hanover Heights neighborhood of Kansas City, Kansas circa 1920.

Photograph of a meeting of a Workers Alliance Lodge meeting. Charles Northington is wearing suspenders, with Anna Northington to his right. John Waltz stands to her right, and Earl Burnley is the fourth person from right in the photograph. Workers Alliance was a national organization of unemployed people who found relief through the Works Progress Administration jobs. The group became closely affiliated with the Communist Party, and lobbied for increased funding for the WPA.

Date: 
1940

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.