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Correspondence from Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, Inmate #31989, to his wife, Bessie DeMayo, discussing personal and legal affairs, and mentioning Tony Ribaste, a member of a Kansas City organized crime family. DeMayo was sentenced to time in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth after a conviction of conspiracy to violate Prohibition law.

Date: 
January 9th 1930

Prison record of Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, Inmate #31989, which includes personal and family information as well as sentencing and arrest dates. DeMayo was sentenced to time in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth after a conviction of conspiracy to violate Prohibition law.

Date: 
March 21st 1929

Correspondence regarding Lemuel Hawkins, Inmate #39929, after he was shot and killed in a robbery on August 19, 1934. The Chicago Police Department requests Hawkins' criminal record from the Leavenworth Penitentiary warden. Hawkins was sentenced to two years in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth after being convicted of violating the National Motor Vehicle Theft Act.

Date: 
August 22nd 1934

Correspondence regarding Lemuel Hawkins, Inmate #39929, after he was shot and killed in a robbery on August 19, 1934. Record Clerk Carl Zarter provides the requested background information and criminal record of Lemuel Hawkins after his death. Hawkins was sentenced to two years in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth after being convicted of violating the National Motor Vehicle Theft Act.

Date: 
September 6th 1934

Letter from Miss Glenn E. Campbell at The Kansas City Provident Association to Isaac Sway, Senior Warden's Assistant at Leavenworth regarding Frank H. Adams, Inmate #52957. The letter discusses a home visit with Adams' wife Bessie and her financial situation. Adams was sentenced to time in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth after being convicted of vote fraud in Kansas City, Missouri.

Date: 
May 19th 1938

Letter from Lewis J. Grout, Chief U.S. Probation Officer, to Mr. N. R. Timmons, Chief Parole Officer at the Leavenworth Penitentiary, regarding Joseph Maher, Inmate #53422, discussion verification of Maher's post-parole employment plans. Maher was sentenced to two years in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth after being convicted of conspiracy to deprive voters of their rights in Kansas City, Missouri.

Date: 
April 27th 1939

Letter from Lewis J. Grout, Chief U.S. Probation Officer, to Mr. N. R. Timmons, Chief Parole Officer at the Leavenworth penitentiary, regarding Frank P. Dixon, Inmate #53423. The letter notes that Dixon has secured post-parole employment as a mechanic. Dixon was sentenced to two years in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth after being convicted of conspiracy to deprive voters of their rights in Kansas City, Missouri.

Date: 
April 26th 1939

Letter from James E. Jones, Acting Prohibition Commisser, regarding the parole of Anthony R. Gizzo, Inmate #20547. Jones reiterates the facts of Gizzo's case and recommends he be denied parole as a "flagrant violator of the Harrison Narcotic Law." Gizzo was sentenced to one year and one day in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth on drug charges.

Date: 
February 26th 1924

Letter from Anthony R. Gizzo, Inmate #20547 to the United States Penitentiary Board of Parole, applying for parole and vowing to "live and remain at liberty without violating the laws." Gizzo was sentenced to one year and one day in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth on drug charges.

Date: 
March 21st 1924

Letter from Stanley R. Fike, treasurer of Inter-City Press, Inc., regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, owner of the business. Fike writes that Higgins was an engaged boss and states that he is proud "proud to say I am his friend." Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Date: 
August 31st 1940

Letter from Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, requesting further consideration of his denied parole request, and noting that since that time he has paid his back taxes by selling off or mortgaging his property, and that his printing business and elderly mother require his attention. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Date: 
February 17th 1941

Letter from Lewis J. Grout, Chief U.S. Probation Officer, to Isaac Sway, Chief Parole Officer at the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, regarding Otto P. Higgins', Inmate #55996-L, release from the penitentiary and the requirement that he report to the probation officer in Kansas City upon his release. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Date: 
June 6th 1941

Letter from U.S. Marshal A. D. Fairbanks to James V. Bennett, Director of the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Fairbanks writes that "our friend, Frank Smith, is very anxious to visit" Pendergast before his release from prison, just one month in the future, and inquiring as to whether this would be possible. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Date: 
April 4th 1940

Memorandum from Robert H. Hudspeth, warden of the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, to James V. Bennett, director of the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The memo discusses Pendergast assigning his lawyers power of attorney to deal with his income tax liability with the Treasury Department, and lists Pendergast's visitor log, including attorneys and Treasury Department agents. The memo also notes that Pendergast has paid "a substantial portion" of his back taxes owed. Also included is a letter of introduction from Charles O'B.

Date: 
January 19th 1940

Letter from James V. Bennett, Director of the Bureau of Prisons, to Robert Hudspeth, warden of the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Bennett writes regarding allegations made by Governor Lloyd Stark that Pendergast "was directing his political organization from Leavenworth," and his discussion about that issue with Elmer Irey, who works in Treasury Department law enforcement. Irey concluded that Stark was misinformed, and that Pendergast was not engaged in political activity from prison.

Date: 
January 25th 1940

Letter from U.S. Marshal A. D. Fairbanks to James V. Bennett, Director of the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Fairbanks inquires as to whether Frank Smith, a long-time friend of Pendergast, could receive permission to visit his friend at the penitentiary, after having been denied in the past due to Pendergast's poor health. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Date: 
December 7th 1939

Letter from Special Agent in Charge Charles O'B. Berry to W. H. Woolf, acting chief of the Intelligence Unit of the Bureau of Internal Revenue, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Berry addresses the concerns of Governor Lloyd C. Stark that Pendergast was engaged in his political machine while serving his sentence in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, in violation of the terms of his conviction.

Date: 
January 17th 1940

Memorandum from Robert H. Hudspeth, warden of the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, to James V. Bennett, director of the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The memo discusses allegations that Pendergast was running his political organization during his imprisonment, and and investigation by the Intelligence Unit of the Bureau of Internal Revenue into the matter.

Date: 
January 22nd 1940

Letter from Franklin Miller, Circuit Attorney for the City of St. Louis, to Carl Zarter, Record Clerk for the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The letter discusses the grand jury investigation into R. Emmet O'Malley, former State Superintendent of Insurance, and the charge of bribery with which he is being charged, and addresses the possible further investigation into Pendergast's role in that crime.

Date: 
July 13th 1939

Letter from C. H. Waring, Chief Medical Officer of the United States Public Health Service, to Justin K. Fuller, Medical Director of the United States Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The letter summarizes Pendergast's health problems, including heart disease, and treatments. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Date: 
June 3rd 1939

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.