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A leaflet for the public, written by the Kansas City Joint Board of the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (ILGWU). The ILGWU requests that the public boycott the Donnelly Garment Company for denying of its workers "the rights and privileges, wage scales, and hours of work that prevail in every shop in the dress industry throughout the country." Included in the leaflet is a copy of a letter written from ILGWU Kansas City Joint Board Manager Wave Tobin to the Donnelly Garment Company on March 9, 1937 addressing concerns by the union.

Date: 
March 9th 1937

A letter from International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (ILGWU) Kansas City Joint Board Manager Wave Tobin to Fred L. Smith of C. J. Gayfer and Co., Mobile, Alabama. Tobin urges Smith to inform the Donnelly Garment Company that C. J. Gayfer and Co. will no longer carry Donnelly garments if they do not cooperate with the ILGWU. Tobin then outlines her grievances with the Donnelly Garment Company and presents her case to Smith.

Date: 
June 30th 1937

A letter from International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (ILGWU) Kansas City Joint Board Manager Wave Tobin to Fred L. Smith of Gayfers Dept. Store, Mobile, Alabama. Tobin urges Smith to inform the Donnelly Garment Company that Gayfers Dept. Store will no longer carry Donnelly garments. Tobin also outlines her grievances with the Donnelly Garment Company and presents her case to Smith.

Date: 
February 6th 1939

Full-page advertisement by International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (ILGWU) in the June 8, 1937 issue of the Kansas City Journal-Post. The ILGWU responds to criticism directed towards the union by the Kansas City Citizens' Protective Council, Inc. in a May 13, 1937 advertisement. The ILGWU also includes an excerpt of a speech made by Frank Prins at garment industry dinner in Kansas City on March 6, 1937.

Date: 
June 8th 1937

A pamphlet showcasing six wardrobes from Nelly Don Soapsuds Fashions'. This specific document was mailed to Miss Adelaide Navious of 3028 Baltimore Avenue, Kansas City, Missouri. The pamphlet also advertises Nelly Don Week, April 27 to May 3 at Emery, Bird, Thayer & Company at 1016-1018 Grand Avenue (now Grand Boulevard), Kansas City, Missouri.

In this legal complaint, Paul F. Broderick, Acting Regional Director of the Seventeenth Region of the National Labor Relations Board, details the charges made against the Donnelly Garment Company by the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union. Broderick lists thirteen points in which the Donnelly Garment Company violates the National Labor Relations Board Rules and Regulations.

Date: 
April 6th 1939

Letter from Lewis J. Grout, Chief U.S. Probation Officer, to Myrl E. Alexander, Acting Parole Executive with the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Grout summarizes Pendergast's case, noting he plead guilty to multiple charges of income tax evasion, and notes that there are special conditions of probation, including paying a fine and back taxes. Grout also draws attention to editorials from the May 22, 1939 edition of the Kansas City Star and the May 23, 1939 edition of the Kansas City Times.

Date: 
May 24th 1939

Clipping from the Kansas City Times on February 16, 1937 showing drawings and photographs from the 1936 Election Vote Fraud Trial. Included are depictions of the courtroom, evidence, and corridor outside of the courtroom. Vincent J. Doherty (Chief Deputy Election Commissioner), Fred M. Bellemere (Chairman of the Board of Election Commissioners), and Maurice M. Milligan (U.S. District Attorney).

Date: 
February 16th 1937

Clipping entitled, "The Thirteen Jurors Who Will Hear the Vote Fraud Trial" from the Kansas City Times on February 16, 1937. The caption provides the name, profession, and hometown of each juror, all of whom live outside of Jackson County.

Date: 
February 16th 1937

Citizens' League Bulletin issue with the main article reporting on the 1936 Election Voter Fraud Trials and general corrpution in Kansas City. Other articles document the cost of crime, air transportation, tax dogers, economic plans, federal salaries, and Kansas City gambling.

Date: 
June 12th 1937

Brief in support of defendant's motion to dismiss in Civil Action No. 42: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada. The defendant's attorneys argue for the dismal of Bluford's suit against Canada, the registrar of the University of Missouri, stating that she has no standing for the damages she seeks. They state that Missouri requires "separation of the white and negro races for purposes of higher education," and that Lincoln University has "the mandatory duty to provide for negro residents ...

Date: 
1940

Reply brief of defendant on motion to dismiss in Civil Action No. 42: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada. The document responds to a memo by Bluford's attorneys, which in turn responds to Canada's attorneys brief requesting dismissal of the case. Canada's attorneys reject Bluford's assertion that Canada, as registrar, is a "ministerial officer" of the university, and insist he is a "mere subordinate employee." The defense team also argues that Bluford and her attorneys misunderstand the requirements of the decision in Gaines v.

Date: 
March 20th 1940

Motion to dismiss in Civil Action No. 42: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada. The defendant's attorneys argue for the dismal of Bluford's suit against Canada, the registrar of the University of Missouri, stating that she has no standing for the damages she seeks.

Date: 
November 24th 1939

Defendant's motion for directed verdict in Civil Action No. 42: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada. The defendant's attorneys argue for a verdict in their favor by stating that Bluford has failed to state a claim, nor prove one, that justifies relief, nor has she proven that she applied to the graduate program in journalism at the University of Missouri in good faith. They also assert that Bluford provided no evidence that she had ever applied to Lincoln University.

Date: 
October 24th 1940

Letter from attorney Ralph E. Murray to Judge John C. Collet, regarding Civil Action No. 42: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada, requesting a continuance on behalf of the attorneys of both the plaintiff and defendant in the hearing of the motion to dismiss the case. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and her effort to gain admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism, and repeated denials due to her race, lead to a a series of lawsuits that eventually reached the Missouri Supreme Court.

Date: 
December 26th 1939

Letter from attorney William S. Hogsett to the clerk of the U.S. District Court, regarding Civil Action No. 42: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada, to submit the defendant's motion to dismiss. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and her effort to gain admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism, and repeated denials due to her race, lead to a a series of lawsuits that eventually reached the Missouri Supreme Court.

Date: 
November 22nd 1939

Letter from attorney William S. Hogsett to the clerk of the U.S. District Court, regarding Civil Action No. 42: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada, notifying the court of his intention, along with Senator Nick T. Cave, to represent the defendant, and to file a motion to dismiss the complaint. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and her effort to gain admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism, and repeated denials due to her race, lead to a a series of lawsuits that eventually reached the Missouri Supreme Court.

Date: 
November 15th 1939

Letter from U.S. District Court Clerk A. L. Arnold to attorney Carl R. Johnson, regarding Civil Action No. 42: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada, inquiring as to whether the plaintiff has yet filed an appeal. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and her effort to gain admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism, and repeated denials due to her race, lead to a a series of lawsuits that eventually reached the Missouri Supreme Court.

Date: 
January 18th 1941

Letter from defense attorney William S. Hogsett to the clerk of the U.S. District Court in Civil Action No. 42: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada. Hogsett writes that he is enclosing the defendant's answer to the complaint. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and her effort to gain admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism, and repeated denials due to her race, lead to a a series of lawsuits that eventually reached the Missouri Supreme Court.

Date: 
June 18th 1940

Letter from defense attorney Ralph E. Murray to Judge John C. Collet regarding Civil Action No. 42: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada, enclosing the reply brief from the defendant on the motion to dismiss the case. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and her effort to gain admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism, and repeated denials due to her race, lead to a a series of lawsuits that eventually reached the Missouri Supreme Court.

Date: 
March 19th 1940

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.