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Clipping from the Kansas City Star on February 1, 1931 showing city hall employees with free passes getting onto a street car driven by Henry F. McElroy. A "Ready Mixed" cart is being pulled behind the street car.

Date: 
February 1st 1931

Clipping from the Kansas City Star on April 23, 1931 showing three men (presumably Tom Pendergast, Cas Welch, and Joe Shannon) taking a joy ride while a young boy holds a sign stating, "We have no money for playground supervision."

Date: 
April 23rd 1931

Unknown Republican publication without volume or issue identification with excerpts from several St. Louis newspapers about the corrupting influence of Tom Pendergast in Kansas City, including the accusation that he chose the Democratic nominee for Governor. Crimes committed by Johnny Lazia and others are also described. The last page is titled "Pendergast Gang is Strictly 'Business'" [this portion could not be scanned due to adhesive].

Date: 
1932

Letter from Tom Pendergast to Lloyd C. Stark, asking him to give special consideration to Mart Barrons and ensure that he gets the advertising business for the Apple Association.

Date: 
June 5th 1933

Letter from Jimmy Hurst to Lloyd C. Stark, advising Stark on strengthening certain political relationships for the upcoming campaign, including his connection with Jim Aylward. He also writes that Judge Ross "is one of the very last men T.J. consults with when making an important political move," and that he spoke with the judge about Stark.

Date: 
September 5th 1935

Letter from Robert A. Glenn to Lloyd C. Stark writing about the view of the governors race from St. Louis and what issues may await him during the campaign.

Date: 
October 17th 1935

Letter from Lloyd C. Stark to Tom Pendergast, writing that he is sending "a little fountain pencil" as a gift for Mrs. Pendergast.

Date: 
May 21st 1935

List of recipients of a gift of Golden Delicious apple cider from Lloyd C. Stark's orchards.

Date: 
November 1935

Article from the New York World-Telegram on Tom Pendergast, in which the Kansas City boss offers his opinions on political machines, strong bosses and local politics. He and Mayor Bryce Smith also discuss Pendergast's Ready Mixed Concrete Company.

Date: 
July 12th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a notice that Future’s publishers plan to temporarily suspend publication to reorganize the paper, and also note that “youth is interested and youth is organizing,” and “FUTURE is their paper.” Other featured articles include: “Why Charge a Cover?” (p.

Date: 
July 19th 1935

Citizens' League Bulletin issue with the main article entitled "King of Kansas City, Emperor of Missouri" about the corrupt activities of Boss Tom Pendergast of Kansas City.

Date: 
March 6th 1937

Letter from Philip A. Lantz to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, lauding him for his work against corruption in Missouri, including his work for James Douglas' election to the Missouri Supreme Court. Lantz says the Pendergast machine is an "Ala Baba band of boodlers [who] want to get their filthy paws on the whole state for the glory of Ready Mixed and the plethora of loot."

Date: 
July 15th 1938

Postcard from E. E. West to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, stating his support for James M. Douglas in the upcoming Supreme Court primary and accusing corruption in city concrete business. He reports that the city won't pass inspections for builders who mix their own concrete, "but if Ready Mix furnishes it they pass it without seeing it."

Date: 
July 28th 1938

Pamphlet describing how Pendergast, "King of Kansas City, Emperor of Missouri," and his machine gained power in Kansas City and its role in statewide election fraud.

Date: 
1938

Transcript of minutes from Tom Pendergast's parole hearing before Arthur D. Wood, chairman of the United States Board of Parole. Pendergast notes his health problems, including a bad heart and colostomy, and lack of prior convictions, as reasons he should be released from the penitentiary. He also discusses his family, his role at Ready Mixed Concrete Company, and a pending indictment in state court.

Date: 
November 4th 1939

Application for parole made by Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, for which he became eligible on October 28, 1939. He states that his plans upon release will be to return to his home to reside with his wife and family, and to return to work as president of Ready Mixed Concrete Company. In support of his application, he notes that this conviction was his first offense, and also notes that he is "constantly in need of Medical Attention." He lists James Kemper and R. P. Lyons as his parole advisor and employer, respectively.

Date: 
June 28th 1939

Agreement between R. P. Lyons, vice president of Ready Mixed Concrete Company, and the United States Board of Parole, stating that Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, will be employed "steadily in the occupation of President" of Ready Mixed Concrete upon his parole, and agreeing to report to U.S. Probation Officer Lewis Grout should Pendergast's work become unsatisfactory. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S.

Date: 
October 28th 1939

U.S. Attorney Maurice M. Milligan's opening statement in Criminal Case No. 14652: United States vs. Matthew S. Murray, defendant. Milligan notes that Murray filed tax returns in each of those years, for considerably less than his actual income, i.e. reporting net income of $3,500.85 in 1935, but actually receiving $14,576.88, and that he defrauded the government out of $6,577.29 in total over those five years.

Date: 
1940

Judgment in Criminal Case No. 14652: United States vs. Matthew S. Murray, defendant. Judge Albert L. Reeves' statement addresses the issue of whether certain payments are to be considered gifts, as the defendant claims, or compensation, which would be taxable, says that the deciding factor between the two is the intention of the parties involved, and suggests further inquiry into that question is required. Those payments were made by John J. Pryor, E. L. Schneider, and T. J.

Date: 
March 13th 1940

Monthly supervision reports, conducted by Lewis J. Grout, Probation Officer, for Tom Pendergast upon his release from the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth. The reports for the months of July, August, and September, include his residence, his return to work as president of Ready-Mixed Concrete, his wages and expenses, and other remarks. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Date: 
September 3rd 1940

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.