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Letter from Kansas City Court of Appeals judge, Ewing C. Bland, to his uncle on April 19, 1921. Bland comments in relation to his own political campaign that, "The Pendergast faction now seems the strongest and could no doubt control any delegation from this county."

Date: 
April 19th 1921

Letter from C. J. Hitchcock to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on March 22, 1934. Hitchcock praises Mitchell for his public attack on Thomas J. Pendergast and discusses unemployment among trained railroad men.

Date: 
March 22nd 1934

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to R. B. Oliver on March 26, 1934. Mitchell informs Oliver that the Kansas City local election takes place the following day and provides some instances of voter fraud there. He says, "In the north end of Kansas City... the census shows a population of 6,000 and in the same area the registered vote is 30,000."

Date: 
March 26th 1934

Letter from Martin J. (M. J.) Collins to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on April 2, 1934. Collins laments the victory of the Pendergast machine in the recent Kansas City local election. He also comments on national political matters concerning Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Date: 
April 2nd 1934

Letter from Edgar Shook to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on April 16, 1934. Shook agrees with Mitchell on the necessity of a Kansas City candidate for Senate that is not tied to the Pendergast machine. He then discusses possible candidates for said position. Despite the Pendergast machine victory during the recent Kansas City local election, Shook is confident that "the tragedies of election day sounded an endless knell to this machine."

Date: 
April 16th 1934

Letter from T. O'Donnell to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in which O'Donnell informs Mitchell he will be sending a document describing "'Machine tactics' in Jackson County government." O'Donnell claims it would be useful information for any U.S. Senate candidate opposing the Pendergast Machine.

Date: 
June 10th 1934

Letter from G. H Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 14, 1934. Foree speculates how the current field of U.S. Senate candidates for Missouri formed and who will win at election. He comments, "This coming primary is not one in which the choice of Democracy will win- it will be Boss manipulated."

Date: 
June 14th 1934

Letter from Edgar Shook to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in which Shook speaks highly of Russell F. Greiner and Leland Hazard as anti-Pendergast activists in Kansas City, Missouri.

Date: 
December 11th 1934

Letter from Frederick R. Barkhurst to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 18, 1935. Barkhurst praises Mitchell for his stance against Thomas J. Pendergast and encourages Mitchell to run for the next governor of Missouri.

Date: 
June 18th 1935

Letter from Frederick E. Whitten to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 21, 1935. Despite talk in Kansas City of Thomas J. Pendergast's power in Washington D.C., Whitten praises Mitchell for his stance against Pendergast's influence. He comments, "Socialism, Bossism, and gang control have no part in Democratic or American Government, and those of us who have a true concern and regard for the history and accomplishments of the Democratic party cannot help but look with alarm to the future of the party."

Date: 
June 21st 1935

Letter from William Hirth, publisher and managing editor of The Missouri Farmer, to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on April 13, 1940, regarding concerns over the New Deal. Hirth also attempts to rally support for Lloyd C. Stark for his efforts in dismantling the Pendergast Machine.

Date: 
April 13th 1940

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to William Hirth, publisher and managing editor of The Missouri Farmer, on April 20, 1940. Mitchell supports Lloyd C. Stark's efforts to dismantle the Pendergast Machine, but says that he cannot endorse Stark or anyone else that supports the New Deal. Mitchell also states that "The machine is by no means dead," and that it "is very much alive, not only in Kansas City, but throughout the state." He then provides his opinion on the outlook of the upcoming election for U.S. Senator from Missouri.

Date: 
April 20th 1940

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Senator Manvel H. Davis on August 15, 1940. Mitchell discusses the results of the 1940 primary election in Missouri and stresses the importance of an honest election in November.

Date: 
August 15th 1940

Letter from Albert K. Mitchell to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on August 27, 1940. Albert acknowledges receipt of information provided by Ewing concerning Pendergast support of Truman's senate reelection campaign. Albert also discusses U.S. Senator of New Mexico Carl Hatch and his support for the Pendergast Machine.

Date: 
August 27th 1940

Letter from Harry S. Truman to Thomas McGee in which Truman informs McGee he was able to speak with President Franklin D. Roosevelt and reassure him that Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. was not recommended for political appointment by Pendergast Organization, or by the state organization of Missouri. Mitchell was recently removed from his position as assistant secretary of commerce.

Date: 
June 21st 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on pages 3 and 8, about the selling of merchandise stolen from Kansas merchants in Kansas City pawn shops, and description of the subsequent closing of small shops not tied to the Pendergast machine and sentencing of a black man to 40 years in jail in lieu of convicting the proprietor of a guilty shop at 9th and Main Streets, and other issues. Other featured articles include: “Fame!” (p.

Date: 
March 1st 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the escape from federal police in Kansas City of Sam Randazzo, "a St. Louis gangster" being released from Leavenworth, with the help of police officials Otto Higgins and Jeff Rayen. Other featured articles include: “Patriots Go to Riverside” (p.

Date: 
May 24th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the Kansas Citians of Italian descent and their often unfair treatment in the newspapers for their comparatively few members of organized crime, and descriptions of several "cultured and law-abiding" local Italians such as musicians M. A. Lenge, N. DeRubertis, Mike Russo, Arturo Corti, Gustavo Corti, and Rosemarie Brancato; artists Dante Cosentino, Frank Tommassini, and Paulo D'Anna; and scientists and teachers Dr.

Date: 
May 31st 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the apartments on the Country Club Plaza and Armour Boulevard managed by the Assured Rental Company (led by George Goldman and Herman Shapiro), in the city's "South Side," voting against the Pendergast ticket City Council nominees.

Date: 
June 7th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the effusive spending of city funds on the Kansas City Zoo, comparing the luxurious living conditions of a tiger there to many thousands of Kansas Citians with very poor housing and utilities, etc., including illustrative photos. Other featured articles include: “Arson Aylor” (p.

Date: 
June 14th 1935

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.