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Political attack advertisement that documents Kansas City Star owner August F. Seested's political exploits for personal gain in local real estate. This document was produced to discourage Kansas Citians from voting for Kansas City Police Commissioner Matthew Foster, the Republican candidate for mayor.

Date: 
March 26th 1922

Three excerpts from Republican sources that document police brutality present in the Kansas City Police Department. Excerpts include an editorial from the Kansas City Star from August 30, 1921, a court opinion by Judge Thad B. Landon, and a statement from Attorney R. R. Brewster published on September 4, 1921. This broadside was produced to discourage Kansas Citians from voting for Kansas City Police Commissioner Matthew Foster, the Republican candidate for mayor.

Date: 
1922

Clipping from the Kansas City Journal-Post that criticizes both candidates for mayor: Matthew Foster and Frank H. Cromwell. Foster, a Republican backed by the Kansas City Star, is described as being overzealous in his pursuit as Kansas City police commissioner to "stamp out vice and lawlessness". Cromwell, on the other hand, is accused of being backed by the Kansas City Democratic machine. The Journal-Post urges Kansas City to vote and make their voice heard.

Date: 
April 3rd 1922

Form letter from Joseph B. Shannon to the people of Kansas City in which Shannon provides a list and figures documenting the rise of crime and police brutality in Kansas City from 1921-24 with the police department controlled by Matthew Foster and The Kansas City Star. In the postscript, Shannon alleges that policemen were ordered to "pay monthly political assessments" and states that the past "four years of police administration cost the taxpayers of Kansas City $5,232,691.74."

Date: 
March 19th 1925

Cartoon from the Kansas City Star after the local election on March 25, 1930. The drawing depicts James P. Aylward driving a street sweeper with Bryce B. Smith, Henry F. McElroy, Alfred N. Gossett, Thomas J. Pendergast, Joseph B. Shannon, and Casimir J. Welch. The caption reads, "The Democratic Machine makes a clean sweep in our recent municipal election."

Date: 
March 30th 1930

Cartoon from the Kansas City Journal-Post before the local election on March 25, 1930. The drawing depicts Tom Pendergast as a ringleader in a circus with his assistant Cas Welch by his side. Their pockets are stuffed with local infrastructure contracts. Spectators to the circus include Henry F. McElroy, Alfred N. Gossett, Charles H. Clark, Bryce B. Smith, Ruby D. Garrett, Elliott H. Jones, Byron Spencer, Frank M. Eviston, James B. Shoemaker, and Joseph B. Shannon.

Date: 
March 20th 1930

Series of articles from the Kansas City Star entitled "What Kansas City Is to Get for Its Ten-Year Plan Money". It details each proposition to be voted upon in the May 26, 1931 election.

Date: 
January 22nd 1931

Clipping from the Kansas City Star on February 1, 1931 showing city hall employees with free passes getting onto a street car driven by Henry F. McElroy. A "Ready Mixed" cart is being pulled behind the street car.

Date: 
February 1st 1931

Clipping from the Kansas City Star on February 1, 1931 showing Joe Shannon turning over the reins to a rabbit drawn carriage of the "Rabbit Faction" to Peter J. Kelly. Dr. L. C. "Doc" Johnson is shown walking away in the background.

Date: 
February 1st 1931

Clipping from the Kansas City Star on June 12, 1931 showing corruption holding back "Municipal Building Progress" and "Municipal Government Progress" in Kansas City.

Date: 
June 12th 1931

Clipping from the Kansas City Star on March 22, 1931 showing graves where street parking should be in downtown Kansas City.

Date: 
March 22nd 1931

Clipping from the Kansas City Star of Tom Pendergast, Joe Shannon, and Cas Welch dressed as old women and knitting while the Kansas City Police Department plays like children on the floor. The signs on the wall show, "God Bless Our Home", "Crime never pays", and "The way of the transgressor is hard".

Date: 
1931

Clipping from the Kansas City Star on April 22, 1931 shows a satirical concept for police badges to be used by "Goat", "Rabbit", and "Hybrid" factions controlled by Tom Pendergast, Joe Shannon, and Cas Welch, respectively.

Date: 
April 22nd 1931

Clipping from the Kansas City Star on May 3, 1931 showing motorists avoiding potholes with men sleeping in them. A pedestrian asks, "See anyone?" The caption states, "There are 150 Men filling holes in the streets says Matt S. Murray. -But where are they? ('Has anybody looked in the bottom of the holes?')."

Date: 
May 3rd 1931

Clipping from the Kansas City Star on February 15, 1931 showing Democrats eating around the "Water Main Job Counter" while Tom Pendergast says, "Those without letters from Democratic precinct captains eat at the second table, maybe." Those waiting to say "When do we eat?"

Date: 
February 15th 1931

Clipping from the Kansas City Star on April 23, 1931 showing three men (presumably Tom Pendergast, Cas Welch, and Joe Shannon) taking a joy ride while a young boy holds a sign stating, "We have no money for playground supervision."

Date: 
April 23rd 1931

Clipping from the Kansas City Star on April 25, 1931 showing Henry F. McElroy trying to account for a $200,000 deficit by April 30th while two countrymen in the background keep warm by a fire. One of them says, "He sure kin figger."

Date: 
April 25th 1931

Clipping from the Kansas City Star on February 15, 1931 showing Tom Pendergast, Joe Shannon, and Cas Welch enjoying Home Rule of the Kansas City Police Department while trading police action figures. The onlooking "Kibitzer" references a pseudonymous City Hall inside source for the Kansas City Star in the early 1930s.

Date: 
February 15th 1931

Letter from Ruby Henshaw to Lloyd Stark. She describes atttitudes in Kansas City about Tom Pendergast and cautions Stark about associating with him. She also discusses her work with a life insurance company.

Date: 
October 19th 1932

A letter from J. Stuart Morrison to Francis Wilson discussing the circumstances of his departure from the Missouri School for the Deaf, and implying that he would like the appointment if Wilson wins the general election for Governor.

Date: 
August 14th 1932

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.