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Letter from J. R. Morgan to Governor Lloyd C. Stark regarding Stark's work cleaning up Kansas City and its police department. He describes Captain Dougherty at Station #4 as "crooked as any man that ever walked the face of the earth."

Date: 
June 3rd 1939

Press release containing the test of a statement given by William Hirth, publisher of the Missouri Farmer and president of the Missouri Farmers' Association, regarding the state Democratic convention. Hirth reports that the recent "convention in St. Louis was the most shameful gathering of its kind in the history of Missouri," and describes animosity between Clark-Pendergast forces and Governor Lloyd C. Stark.

Date: 
April 21st 1940

Pamphlet describing how Pendergast, "King of Kansas City, Emperor of Missouri," and his machine gained power in Kansas City and its role in statewide election fraud.

Date: 
1938

Letter from Olive Turner to Governor Lloyd C. Stark saying "it seems a shame that law abiding, tax-paying citizens have to get under cover and write to their Governor in order to live in this town." She expresses concerns about corruption, particularly at the state cosmetology board and the County Home for the Aged.

Date: 
March 25th 1939

Letter from L. E. Myers to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, stating that Jackson County prosecutor W. W. Graves is corrupt, and accusing him letting rapists and thieves go free in a case for a bribe.

Date: 
February 15th 1940

Anonymous letter implicating the Kansas City Police Department in voting irregularities and that state control of the department is what enabled fairer elections.

Letter from H. V. Shirts to Governor Guy B. Park urging him to take action against perpetrators of election fraud in recent Kansas City primaries.

Date: 
October 7th 1936

Letter from John E. Robertson to Guy B. Park regarding violence and election fraud taking place at a March 6th primary election.

Date: 
March 13th 1934

Letter from Lewis Goodson to Ralph Lozier hoping for Lozier's and Tom Pendergast's assistance in keeping his job.

Date: 
April 1st 1932

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to Lewis Goodson. He informs Goodson that he has written to Judge Henry F. McElroy and James M. Pendergast in support of Goodson's continued employment on the Kansas City Police force.

Date: 
April 8th 1932

Transcript of the parole hearing for Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, before the Judge T. Webber Wilson. Wilson questions Higgins about his crime of income tax evasion, his work and personal history, and his plans for work should he be paroled.

Date: 
July 17th 1940

Transcript of minutes from Tom Pendergast's parole hearing before Arthur D. Wood, chairman of the United States Board of Parole. Pendergast notes his health problems, including a bad heart and colostomy, and lack of prior convictions, as reasons he should be released from the penitentiary. He also discusses his family, his role at Ready Mixed Concrete Company, and a pending indictment in state court.

Date: 
November 4th 1939

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, with a photo and description of Kansas City FBI agent Lieutenant William Gordon, "commended by J. Edgar Hoover," in an article about the crime-fighting operations of the Federal Bureau of Investigations and its relation to Kansas City crime. Sheriff Bash, Chief Coffey, Director Reppert, Chief of Detectives Thomas Higgins, and Lieutenant George Rayen are also discussed. Other featured articles include: “Journey to the K.C.

Date: 
February 8th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, asserting that it “is well established that there are approximately three thousand persons drawing pay from the city when the work actually is being done by about fifteen hundred,” the impact that has on salaries, and the departments in which the issue is most evident. Other featured articles include: “You May Live Till March, Cabbies” (p.

Date: 
February 22nd 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on pages 3 and 8, about the selling of merchandise stolen from Kansas merchants in Kansas City pawn shops, and description of the subsequent closing of small shops not tied to the Pendergast machine and sentencing of a black man to 40 years in jail in lieu of convicting the proprietor of a guilty shop at 9th and Main Streets, and other issues. Other featured articles include: “Fame!” (p.

Date: 
March 1st 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the crime rate for auto theft and parts stripping in Kansas City compared to Saint Louis and description of its inaccurate measurements by the Kansas City Police Department not accepted by the FBI, with photo of a stripped car and a portrait of J. Edgar Hoover. Other featured articles include: “One Year Ago This Week” (p.

Date: 
March 8th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today.

Date: 
March 29th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, with a photo and brief history of the Kansas City Municipal Airport (later called the Downtown Airport) "between North Kansas City and Kansas City proper," dedicated in 1927 and opened in 1929 with four airlines and reorganization after "cancellation of government mail contracts" in 1934. Other featured articles include: “Snapshots of the Week” (p.

Date: 
March 15th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. This issue includes a supplemental section coming out against a proposed permanent registration bill they argue “will only saddle us with vote fraud conditions even worse than in the past,” and reporting past voter fraud. Other featured articles include: “He Must Have Worried Terribly” (pp.

Date: 
April 5th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a photo and article, continued on page 8, about "Dr. Schorer," a 54-year old pediatric physician appointed by Henry McElroy as the city's Director of Health, born in Wisconsin in 1881 and coming to Kansas City in 1913. Other featured articles include: “Politics and Hogs” (p. 2), about local hotels and restaurants selling their garbage to be used as hog feed and interference by the Kansas City Collection Company; “’S Not ‘N Eagle—‘S ‘N Owl” (p.

Date: 
April 19th 1935

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.