Search

Displaying 1 - 20 of 28

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, with a photo and description of Kansas City FBI agent Lieutenant William Gordon, "commended by J. Edgar Hoover," in an article about the crime-fighting operations of the Federal Bureau of Investigations and its relation to Kansas City crime. Sheriff Bash, Chief Coffey, Director Reppert, Chief of Detectives Thomas Higgins, and Lieutenant George Rayen are also discussed. Other featured articles include: “Journey to the K.C.

Date: 
February 8th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about drugstores, such as the Katz chain, that now sell other goods such as groceries, liquor, and general merchandise, and how they evade laws limiting the days traditional grocery and liquor stores can remain open. Other featured articles include: “We’ve Got the Equipment” (p. 2), regarding new forensic investigation techniques touted by J.

Date: 
February 15th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the crime rate for auto theft and parts stripping in Kansas City compared to Saint Louis and description of its inaccurate measurements by the Kansas City Police Department not accepted by the FBI, with photo of a stripped car and a portrait of J. Edgar Hoover. Other featured articles include: “One Year Ago This Week” (p.

Date: 
March 8th 1935

Parole report for Joseph Maher, Inmate #53422, which includes details of the case against him, including his codefendants and date of the crime. Maher was sentenced to two years in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth after being convicted of conspiracy to deprive voters of their rights in Kansas City, Missouri.

Date: 
July 27th 1937

FBI report on Robert Strohm, Inmate #53421, which lists prior criminal charges of highway robbery and election fraud. Strohm was sentenced to two years and six months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth after being convicted of conspiracy to deprive voters of their rights in Kansas City, Missouri.

Date: 
July 25th 1938

FBI report for Joseph Maher, Inmate #53422, which records his charges and sentences. Maher was sentenced to two years in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth after being convicted of conspiracy to deprive voters of their rights in Kansas City, Missouri.

Date: 
July 25th 1938

Federal Bureau of Investigation record for Glenn Barnard, Inmate #53424, which lists charges and sentencing he received. Barnard was sentenced to one year and six months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth after being convicted of conspiracy to deprive voters of their rights in Kansas City, Missouri.

Date: 
July 25th 1938

FBI report on Ernest Williams, Inmate #53428, listing the charges against him and sentence he received. Williams was sentenced to one year and one day in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth after being convicted of conspiracy to deprive voters of their rights in Kansas City, Missouri.

Date: 
July 25th 1938

Transcript of the Court's Charge to the Grand Jury in case investigating election fraud in a 1936 election.

Date: 
June 20th 1938

Letter from U.S. Attorney Maurice Milligan to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, reporting on a discussion with the local Agent in Charge of the FBI about the possibility of election investigations in Missouri. Milligan makes suggestions for how to rebut accusations of allegiance, and then disloyalty, to the Pendergast machine.

Date: 
July 15th 1938

FBI report for Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, which records his charges and sentences. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Date: 
November 9th 1939

FBI report on Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, listing the charges against him and sentence he received. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Date: 
November 9th 1939

Pamphlet written by Ewing Young Mitchell, former Assistant Secretary of Commerce in Franklin D. Roosevelt administration's first term. He asserts "[t]he first nomination for United States Senator of Harry S. Truman was stolen," and proceeds to argue that point. The Pendergast machine is described as "the most corrupt, the most brazen, gang of thieves who ever looted an American city," and describes the Pendergasts' businesses' activities and obstructions around the city.

Date: 
October 6th 1944

Pamphlet written by Ewing Young Mitchell, former Assistant Secretary of Commerce in Franklin D. Roosevelt administration's first term. He first responds to Harry Truman's statement to a reporter that "he never had sought the support of the Pendergast political organization in Missouri" and that the Pendergast machine was not involved in scandal until after he was elected to the Senate.

Date: 
October 1944

FBI report for Giuseppe "Joseph" DeLuca, Inmate #1742-TT, which records his current and prior charges and sentences. DeLuca was sentenced to three years in the Federal Correctional Institution at Texarkana, Texas, after being convicted of selling and concealing narcotics.

Date: 
September 10th 1945

Letter from George H. White to U.S. Attorney Sam Wear regarding an investigation into Carl Carramusa. Carramusa is accused of being a representative of the Kansas City Narcotic Syndicate, a subsidiary of the Kansas City Mafia. The letter provides a history of Impostato's entry into Kansas City organized crime through John Lazia after arriving from Chicago in 1929, and connects the Kansas City narcotics trade with St. Louis, Tampa, Havana, and other cities.

Date: 
August 31st 1945

Letter written by Mary Bonomo, to be provide information to the FBI in the event of her death. She writes that she fears for her life due to a debt owed to her by Chuck Casciopipa, and due to knowledge of other crimes she and her husband were suspected of having. She also feared her imprisoned husband Mario's brothers Tom and Sam, as well as Joe DiGiovanni.

Date: 
January 26th 1946

FBI record for Peter DiGiovanni listing IRS and liquor violations, and including biographical information and a physical description.

Date: 
August 25th 1950

FBI record for Kansas City organized crime figure Joseph "Scarface" DiGiovanni, including his home and work addresses, as well as listing charges from 1944 and 1946.

Date: 
September 19th 1950

FBI report for Gus Gargotta, including Prohibition violations, bank robbery, murder, and other charges in Kansas City, Omaha, and Wichita. The document also includes biographical information and a physical description.

Date: 
August 25th 1950

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.