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St. Louis Star-Times article about the 1936 investigation into election fraud, including a sketch of Pendergast by Thomas Hart Benton. The article reports Pendergast "said today that he had been investigated so often that 'one more doesn't bother me much.'" He argued that he had no idea of any election fraud.

Date: 
December 15th 1936

Letter from Chas. W. Dickey to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, describing the influence of the Pendergast machine in Greene County, and lauding his work in cleaning up state politics.

Date: 
October 27th 1937

Letter from E. K. Bonebrake to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, discussing his experience with machine election fraud in his role as a Republican election judge in 1936. He reports that "the job is not to be envied by an honest citizen," and that Pendergast's machine "had such a large force of workers, against which I had to fight almost single-handed."

Date: 
January 27th 1938

Letter from Burns Strader to Governor Lloyd C. Stark regarding the upcoming Missouri Supreme Court primary. He writes that "the elections have been characterized by deliberate violation of the law governing elections," and offers suggestions for cleaning up the process.

Date: 
July 13th 1938

Letter from Spencer Salisbury to Governor Lloyd C. Stark discussing the election board and voter registration in Eastern Jackson County ahead of the Douglas-Billings Supreme Court vote.

Date: 
July 16th 1938

Letter from Paul G. Koontz to Governor Lloyd C. Stark regarding the activities of election clerks and precinct captains in local elections. He is concerned that "Charter Party precinct captains insist on accompanying [election] clerks," and believes "the Election Board has the situation well in hand."

Date: 
March 5th 1940

Letter from Major Gregory Vigeant, Jr., to the Kansas City Board of Election Commissioners discussing issues at his polling place during August and March 1940 elections, including evidence that "a dead man and his wife in this precinct had been voted."

Date: 
August 9th 1940

Letter from Major Gregory Vigeant, Jr., to the Kansas City Board of Election Commissioners discussing issues at polling places during previous elections. He writes that "citizens have been threatened and told if they did note vote as ... they were told to by the machine that taxes would be raised and I, myself, have been threatened by violence."

Date: 
July 9th 1940

Letter from Chas. A. Orr to Guy B. Park discussing Republican employees in his law office and listing their recommendations and endorsements, as well as noting that current judges and clerks were primarily commissioned by the prior election board.

Date: 
January 17th 1934

Letter from David Proctor to Jesse Barrett, describing Kansas City Republicans as being aligned with the Pendergast Machine.

Date: 
January 15th 1936

Letter from David M. Proctor to Jesse Barrett discussing the Republican factions in Kansas City, particularly those who are aligned with the Pendergast Machine.

Date: 
January 26th 1936

A brief letter and accompanying newspaper article from William Hirth to Jesse Bennett. The article concerns Missouri Governor Lloyd Stark's activities in opposition to the Pendergast Machine in Kansas City.

Date: 
March 18th 1938

Letter from I. N. Watson to Jesse Barrett discussing the recent Kansas City election, and the landcape of fraudulent voting and corruption which persists, despite recent reforms.

Date: 
April 4th 1938

Pamphlet written by Ewing Young Mitchell, former Assistant Secretary of Commerce in Franklin D. Roosevelt administration's first term. He asserts "[t]he first nomination for United States Senator of Harry S. Truman was stolen," and proceeds to argue that point. The Pendergast machine is described as "the most corrupt, the most brazen, gang of thieves who ever looted an American city," and describes the Pendergasts' businesses' activities and obstructions around the city.

Date: 
October 6th 1944

Pamphlet written by Ewing Young Mitchell, former Assistant Secretary of Commerce in Franklin D. Roosevelt administration's first term. He first responds to Harry Truman's statement to a reporter that "he never had sought the support of the Pendergast political organization in Missouri" and that the Pendergast machine was not involved in scandal until after he was elected to the Senate.

Date: 
October 1944
KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.