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A letter from Fred L. Smith of C. J. Gayfer & Company, Inc., Mobile, Alabama to the "Gentlemen" at Donnelly Garment Company (DGC). Upon receiving literature criticizing the DGC from the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (ILGWU), Smith urges DGC "to deal with your employees on a collective basis for a reasonable salary and reasonable working hours." Else, Smith warns that the ILGWU will make their accusations public, which would potentially force retailers to withdraw DGC products.

Date: 
June 19th 1937

A pamphlet showcasing six wardrobes from Nelly Don Soapsuds Fashions'. This specific document was mailed to Miss Adelaide Navious of 3028 Baltimore Avenue, Kansas City, Missouri. The pamphlet also advertises Nelly Don Week, April 27 to May 3 at Emery, Bird, Thayer & Company at 1016-1018 Grand Avenue (now Grand Boulevard), Kansas City, Missouri.

Articles of Agreement between the Donnelly Garment Workers' Union and the Donnelly Garment Company at 1828 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Missouri. At the time of the agreement, 1305 out 1333 Donnelly Garment Company employees were registered with the preceding union. This document defines the rates of pay, hours, election of union committees, and other labor issues.

Date: 
May 27th 1937

Supplemental Agreement provided in the agreement of May 27, 1937 between the Donnelly Garment Workers' Union and the Donnelly Garment Company at 1828 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Missouri. This supplement defines paid holidays, equal benefits amongst employees, and other agreements.

Date: 
June 22nd 1937

Four bar graphs that display how many hours Donnelly Garment Company employees worked each week during a period of four weeks in early 1937. The 'x' axis charts the number of workers up to 550 and the 'y' axis charts hours worked. The graph shows that most employees worked between 40 and 54 hours per week with the most common amount being 53 hours per week.

Date: 
1937

Eight line graphs that display the hourly earnings of Donnelly Garment Company employees in relation to other national garment companies in early 1937. These companies include the Apex Dress Co., Action Dress Inc., Philip Zahn & Co., Samax Dress Co., Max Wiesen, Inc., Famous Dress Co., Haas and Bernstein, and Rudy Dress Co.. The data shows that a majority of Donnelly Garment Company employees earn less than the company's national competitors.

Date: 
1937

Production statistics for the Donnelly Garment Company for the calender years 1936 through 1938. During these three years, the company produced 5,178,474 articles of clothing worth a total of $16,375,096.67.

Date: 
1938

Application for membership to the Local No. 124 of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union, filled out by Katie L. McKinsey, age 26. At the time of application on January 18, 1934, McKinsey was employed at Donnelly Garment Company and had been a sewing machine operator for 6 years.

Date: 
January 18th 1934

A bar graphs displaying the maximum hours worked per week in the dress industry from 1913 to 1939. The 'x' axis charts the year and the 'y' axis charts maximum hours worked. The graph shows a gradual decline in maximum hours worked over time.

Date: 
1940

A bar graphs displaying the minimum hourly wage provision for the lowest paid crafts in the dress industry from 1913 to 1939. The 'x' axis charts the year and the 'y' axis charts the minimum hourly wage in cents. The graph shows a gradual increase in wage over time with a dip in 1933.

Date: 
1940

Photograph of James A. Reed and Nell Donnelly Reed's breakfast room in their home at 5236 Cherry Street, Kansas City, Missouri. The caption reads, "#6 General view of breakfast room showing samll table and chair in south east corner near window. Opening into sunroom. Camera pointing south east. By Rich S. Welch, Operator."

Photograph of James A. Reed and Nell Donnelly Reed's breakfast room in their home at 5236 Cherry Street, Kansas City, Missouri. The caption reads, "#7 Breakfast room. Close-up of small table and chair in south east corner and window opening into sunroom. Camera pointing south. By Rich S. Welch, Operator."

Photograph of James A. Reed and Nell Donnelly Reed's sunroom in their home at 5236 Cherry Street, Kansas City, Missouri. The caption reads, "#8 Sunroom. Camera lens at eyes level equal to that of man sitting in chair nearest camera showing view into breakfast room thru window. Camera pointing north. By Rich S. Welch, Operator."

Photograph of James A. Reed and Nell Donnelly Reed's sunroom in their home at 5236 Cherry Street, Kansas City, Missouri. The caption reads, "#4 Sunroom. Photograph made thru east window from outside. Camera pointing west. By Rich S. Welch, Operator."

Photograph of James A. Reed and Nell Donnelly Reed's sunroom in their home at 5236 Cherry Street, Kansas City, Missouri. The caption reads, "#3 Sunroom from doorway to living room. Camera pointing south and west. By Rich S. Welch, Operator."

Photograph of James A. Reed and Nell Donnelly Reed's living room in their home at 5236 Cherry Street, Kansas City, Missouri. The caption reads, "#2 Living room showing entrance to sunroom left and breakfast room right. By Rich S. Welch, Operator."

Photograph of James A. Reed and Nell Donnelly Reed's home at 5236 Cherry Street, Kansas City, Missouri. The caption reads, "#1 Southside of Senator Reed's home. Camera pointing north. By Rich S. Welch, Operator."

In this legal complaint, Paul F. Broderick, Acting Regional Director of the Seventeenth Region of the National Labor Relations Board, details the charges made against the Donnelly Garment Company by the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union. Broderick lists thirteen points in which the Donnelly Garment Company violates the National Labor Relations Board Rules and Regulations.

Date: 
April 6th 1939

Judgement and sentencing document for Frank Mulloy, Inmate #39293. Mulloy was sentenced to one year and six months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth after being convicted of violating the Prohibition Act.

Date: 
July 6th 1931

Judgement and sentencing document for John Luteran, Inmate #52956. Luteran was sentenced to three years in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth after being convicted of conspiracy to deprive voters of their rights.

Date: 
February 25th 1937

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KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.