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Letter from S. P. Lidell to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, commending Stark for his work for Judge James Douglas and against the Pendergast machine. He writes: "My idea of Democracy, my dear Governor, is not the Pendergast machine-made kind."

Date: 
July 30th 1938

Draft campaign materials for the James Douglas for Supreme Court campaign, including a statement written by Governor Lloyd C. Stark asserting that "the same political boss and the organization he dominates ... are trying to extend their sinister influence to our Supreme Court."

Date: 
1938

Political cartoon entitled "Equal Justice Under Tom's Law," depicting Tom Pendergast with the Missouri Supreme Court in his pocket.

Date: 
1938

St. Louis Star-Times article about the 1936 investigation into election fraud, including a sketch of Pendergast by Thomas Hart Benton. The article reports Pendergast "said today that he had been investigated so often that 'one more doesn't bother me much.'" He argued that he had no idea of any election fraud.

Date: 
December 15th 1936

Letter from Chas. W. Dickey to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, discussing the influence of the Pendergast machine and Kansas City politics through the state, and thanking him for his work to clean up government. Dickey writes that Stark's work "presages ... a brighter day in Missouri politics [and] will do much to insure honest elections and help clean up a rotten mess of corruption."

Date: 
October 1937

Unsigned letter to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, writing that Kansas City's oppression under Pendergast "is only exceeded by Hitler abroad." The letter thanks Stark for his work in cleaning up state goverment and suggests that he looks into Jackson County courts.

Date: 
December 1st 1938

Letter from Gorge Black to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, reporting on a meeting he attended where Tom Pendergast told the crowd that Stark "cares little for old age pension" and mentioned that he had a candidate to be Missouri's next governor.

Unsigned letter to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, including a clipping from the Kansas City Times, regarding the demand to prosecute violations of election laws. The letter also mentions that Prosecutor Tom Graves intends to marry the widow of John Lazia.

Date: 
June 16th 1937

Resolution passed by "a body of Republicans and other patriotic citizens" repudiating First Ward Committeeman Ray Horton "because of his many acts in aiding and abetting the Lazia-McElroy-Pendergast machine," voter fraud, and demanding that Governor Guy Park take steps to clean up the Board of Election Commissioners in Kansas City.

Date: 
April 7th 1934

Letter from Chas. W. Dickey to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, describing the influence of the Pendergast machine in Greene County, and lauding his work in cleaning up state politics.

Date: 
October 27th 1937

Letter from E. K. Bonebrake to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, discussing his experience with machine election fraud in his role as a Republican election judge in 1936. He reports that "the job is not to be envied by an honest citizen," and that Pendergast's machine "had such a large force of workers, against which I had to fight almost single-handed."

Date: 
January 27th 1938

Letter from Charles E. Ellis, one of Kansas City's 12th Ward election judges, to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, concerned about threatened violence against poll workers who don't obey the Pendergast machine in upcoming elections, and requesting military protection due to distrust in the police. He reports that when he acted as an election judge, that he "was forcibly ejected by two North End Ruffians" when he didn't obey a Democratic precinct captain.

Date: 
February 20th 1938

Letter from Mary Pearl Dugg, Kansas City Republican election judge, to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, describing past violence and threats against election workers, and hoping he will continue to work to ensure fair and safe elections.

Date: 
February 14th 1938

Letter from Harry H. Watts, to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, telling Stark that he has a good reputation in Kansas City, "too good to throw away to favor some gangsters," and hoping that extra protection will be brought in to ensure fair voting in upcoming elections.

Date: 
February 14th 1938

Letter from O. L. Thompson to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, thanking him for his work in cleaning up Missouri politics and suggesting that Stark should order the state militia to protect Kansas City polling places on election day. He writes that "the country is now looking in this direction" and citizens "want to be brought out into the light and not be overshadowed by the political cloud" of election fraud and the Pendergast machine.

Date: 
March 1st 1938

Letter from Jackson C. Stanton to Governor Lloyd Stark, discussing Tom's ascension to head the Pendergast family and lauding Stark for his work against the Pendergast machine. He writes "by his religious ties, family relationships, political spoils, and political patronage Tom Pendergast and his faction or clique have become about all there is to Kansas City."

Date: 
March 11th 1938

Letter from J. William Smith to Governor Lloyd C. Stark concerning the inadequacy of police protection in past Kansas City elections and other political and economic problems in the city. He also writes that he "would like to add ... that this is the most Wide 'open' town I was ever in."

Date: 
March 3rd 1938

Letter signed "A Kansas Citian" to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, requesting assistance in ensuring honest elections in Kansas City by protecting voters, judges, and clerks.

Date: 
March 22nd 1938

Letter from John Smith to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, concerned about similar violence and intimidation in the upcoming election as has occurred in the past, and encouraging the governor to send the National Guard into Kansas City to ensure enforcement. Smith reports that Machine workers have told him that the last election, where "intimidations, slugging and even killing took place," was "a Sunday School affair compared to what is coming."

Date: 
March 22nd 1938

Letter signed "A booster" to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, concerned about the lack of law enforcement anticipated at the March 29 election and requesting the presence of National Guard troops to aid in election security and safety. He thinks that would provide "a source of Security to the election workers & would have a bearing on the way lots of citizens would vote."

Date: 
March 24th 1938

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.