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Displaying 541 - 557 of 557

Letter from Ellison Neel to Frank Hollingsworth, chairman of the Douglas-for-Judge Club. Neel recommends John T. Harding to give a speech, and recommends spreading the word that Pendergast is causing trouble amongst the Democrats "to try to help him gratify his spite and ill-will towards" Governor Lloyd C. Stark for not reappointing the local election board.

Date: 
July 26th 1938

Letter from Ellison Neel to Albert P. Newell in reply to Newell's letter of April 15. Neel writes that Kansas City is suffering in many ways "from the strangle-hold that has been obtained upon it by a bunch of men that operate a system that is primarily for their own benefit." He also writes that the machine has "more or less of a monopoly on all public work" and hurts local businesses.

Date: 
April 18th 1938

Letter from Charles L. Dunham to Ellison Neel in support of Neel's stance against the Pendergast machine in the press, and asking for recommendations for attorneys who are not Pendergast-affiliated, saying he "will not employ or recommend an Attorney except those who are enemies to the Pendergast outfit."

Date: 
March 23rd 1938

Letter from Mendell Myers to Ellison A. Neel, in response to Neel's "courageous remarks" published in the previous day's Kansas City Star.

Date: 
March 18th 1938

Letter from Inghram D. Hook to Ellison A. Neel regarding Neel's "forthright statement" in the Kansas City Star regarding the upcoming election. Hook writes that "the machine ... is on its way out."

Date: 
March 25th 1938

Citizens' League Bulletin issue with the main article being a reproduction of a St. Louis Post-Dispatch report and editorial on Kansas City corruption and vice. Other articles document exorbitant car insurance premiums in Kansas City, pervasive public gambling and prostitution, and the relationship between Tom Pendergast and John Lazia.

Date: 
January 12th 1935

Clipping from the Pendergast-controlled newspaper the Missouri Democrat on November 2, 1934. This excerpt provides biographies for their list of preferred local, state, and national candidates for the upcoming election.

Date: 
November 2nd 1934

Clipping from the Pendergast-controlled newspaper the Missouri Democrat on December 7, 1934. The article provides the newspaper's opinion on a letter sent from Tom Pendergast to James A. Farley in which Pendergast asks for clemency for John Lazia. The newspaper shows its bias explaining that Pendergast admits to writing the letter because he is "always willing to assist his friends."

Date: 
December 7th 1934

Advertisement stating that the "Your vote to re-nominate Ernest S. Gantt, Democratic Candidate for Judge of the Supreme Court, will be personally appreciated by The Pendergast Organization." The card was produced by the Eighth Ward Democratic Club, Inc. for the primary election on Tuesday, August 4th, 1936. No signature is included on the blank for Precinct Captain.

Date: 
1936

Citizens' League Bulletin issue with the main article reporting on the 1936 Election Voter Fraud Trials and general corrpution in Kansas City. Other articles document the cost of crime, air transportation, tax dogers, economic plans, federal salaries, and Kansas City gambling.

Date: 
June 12th 1937

Clipping of Frances B. Ryan from the Kansas City Journal-Post on April 1, 1937 with caption stating, "Mrs. Frances Ryan, Pendergast political leader of the Twelfth ward, county Democratic committeewoman, and superintendent of the Jackson County Parental school, was charged in an indictment returned by the federal grand jury Thursday, with violating a national election law in the November election. She is said to have been the first woman ward leader in Kansas City."

Date: 
April 1st 1937

Clipping with a cartoon depicting a group of rabbits forcing a goat to run away. The rabbits represent the Kansas City Democratic faction controlled by Joe Shannon whereas the goat represents the faction controlled by Tom Pendergast. The caption states, "Since the primary, a goat no longer guards the entrance to the farm of "Doc" Johnson, a rabbit leader."

Clipping from the Kansas City Times on October 20, 1966 describing the violence that erupted during the Municipal Election on March 27, 1934. The included photographs show damage done that day in 1934 to an automobile and building owned by the Citizens Fusion party, an anti-Pendergast organization in Kansas City. The article describes election day gang tactics, police complacency, padded voter rolls, and tactics used by Joe Doakes, a Pendergast machine precinct captain. The author then details the murder of Deputy Sheriff Lee Flacy, "a member of the L. C.

Date: 
October 20th 1966

Clipping from the Kansas City Star on February 15, 1931 showing Democrats eating around the "Water Main Job Counter" while Tom Pendergast says, "Those without letters from Democratic precinct captains eat at the second table, maybe." Those waiting to say "When do we eat?"

Date: 
February 15th 1931

Anonymous letter to Governor Lloyd Stark thanking him for his efforts at taking down the St. Louis and Kansas City political machines.

Date: 
January 5th 1941
From Joseph A. Taranto to Governor Stark

Letter describing the corrupt practices of the WPA offices in Kansas City, under the direction of Matt Murray.

Date: 
June 26th 1939

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on pages 3 and 8, about the election frauds in Kansas City government, with a photo of fraudulent signatures in a precinct book and a photo of Gil Bourk, promoter of "permanent registration." Other featured articles include: “Missouri Valley Authority” (p. 2), about a proposed Missouri analog of the New Deal Tennessee Valley Authority; “Better Driving” (p.

Date: 
February 1st 1935

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.