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Manuscript in which Milton C. Lewis outlines talking points (possibly for a speech) concerning political, social, and economic issues that affect the Kansas City black community. The first talking point mentions the Pendergast Machine and efforts to dismantle it.

Letter from J. T. Pinnel to the Governor's Secretary, J. D. James regarding a speech given by the Governor in Pineville, Missouri the previous day, as well as the distribution of Billings campaign materials.

Date: 
July 28th 1938

Letter from J. T. Pinnell to Governor Lloyd Stark identifying persons in McDonald County who worked against Republican interests in recent elections. Pinnell describes the Pendergast machine as a "hydra headed monster."

Date: 
August 5th 1938

Letter from Glidewell to Governor Stark encouraging him to consider running in the upcoming 1940 presidential election.

Date: 
August 3rd 1938

Letter from Roy Glidewell asking governor Stark to acknowledge his previous letter and indicate a timeline for appointing a vacant judgeship.

Date: 
July 8th 1938

Letter from Roy E. Glidewell to Governor Lloyd Stark formally asking to be appointed to the vacant 21st Circuit Court judgeship.

Date: 
June 27th 1938

Letter from Roy E. Glidewell to Stark's campaign manager Col. W. L. Bouchard.

Date: 
June 9th 1938

Letter from Kansas City resident David C. Bagby which claims that, despite some reforms, the Pendergast machine still controls the city, particularly the jobs.

Date: 
June 11th 1939

Letter from a construction foreman praising Gov. Stark for removing a Pendergast affiliate from the role of WPA Director. The letter outlines corruption taking place on a site at the River Des Peres near St. Louis.

Date: 
June 19th 1939

Brief letter that claims that federal spending in Platte County is completely run by Pendergast affiliates.

Date: 
June 21st 1939

Letter to Governor Lloyd stark praising him for his efforts in removing Pendergast influence from the state management of WPA projects.

Date: 
June 21st 1939

Letter signed by "A Republican Supporter" offering a tip about a corrupt construction scheme involving Pendergast supporters.

Date: 
June 22nd 1939

Letter alerting the Governor to the illegal activities of Roy Fulton, president of the union democratic club in Kansas City and operator of a brewery.

Date: 
July 2nd 1939

Letter from a former timekeeper on a Missouri WPA project, describing the corruption in place regarding the awarding of jobs. Gov. Lloyd Stark is CC-ed on the letter.

Date: 
July 3rd 1939

Letter to the Governor from Mrs. L. M. Fry describing corruption and injustices occuring at her husband's job.

Date: 
March 31st 1940

Brief letter naming three WPA bosses in Stella Missouri whom the author recommends be ousted from their positions.

Date: 
April 4th 1940

Letter describing unfair treatment by Pendergast bosses at the WPA in Crawford County, Missouri.

Date: 
April 12th 1940

Letter from John T. Harding to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, discussing corruption in the city and county government, as well as the local police department. He tells Stark that until he enacts new laws, "Kansas City will be at the mercy of the Organization. The Police Department is their gun; as long as they have it, they will make us step around." Harding also suggests that the Pendergast Machine has control over nearly every aspect of the city, "except the sewer system," and indicates that he believes most policemen are good and only acting on orders from above.

Date: 
May 5th 1939

Letter from J. R. Morgan to Governor Lloyd C. Stark regarding Stark's work cleaning up Kansas City and its police department. He describes Captain Dougherty at Station #4 as "crooked as any man that ever walked the face of the earth."

Date: 
June 3rd 1939

Letter from George E. Kimball to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, discussing corruption in public service. Kimball identifies himself as "a former judge of the Jackson County Court, a former City Comtroller of Kansas City, and a Republican candidate for Mayor of Kansas in 1930." He writes to recommend Fred H. Carlson as trustworthy, "clean in his private life as well as his public service," and "highly in favor of taking the police department out of the hands of the corrupt political machine here in Kansas City."

Date: 
June 8th 1939

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.