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Editorial cartoon by S. J. Ray entitled "Out of the Frying Pan Into the Fire", no date. The drawing shows a depiction of "little business" falling out of the frying pan of New Deal economics and into the fire of "priorities and allocations". Source: Vivian Fredericks.

Date: 
October 25th 1941

Editorial cartoon by S. J. Ray entitled "And Such Nice New Buildings, Too", no date. The drawing shows a depiction of "organized crime" hanging out to dry on clotheslines between the Kansas City City Hall and the Kansas City Court House. Source: Vivian Fredericks.

Date: 
May 12th 1939

Editorial cartoon by S. J. Ray entitled "Armistice Day, or Just Nov 11", no date. The drawing depicts "Nov 11" as a cluster of bombs falling toward an anthropomorphic Earth as it takes cover in a bomb shelter. Source: Vivian Fredericks.

Date: 
November 11th 1937

Statement likely made for public release concerning the upcoming election of Kansas City Prosecuting Attorney. The unknown author (possibly Rufus B. Burrus) favors Democrat Michael O'Hern over Republican Chet Keyes and addresses the hypocrisy of the Kansas City Republican Party's argument against voting for O'Hern. The author points out that O'Hern's opponents do not question his character or ability and only dislike him because of the corrupt actions of other Kansas City Democrats.

Date: 
November 1935

Letter from Rufus B. Burrus to the Kansas City Star Editorial Editor in which Burrus responds to an article entitled, "Truman Servant of Pendergast". Burrus believes statements in the article to be untrue and addresses allegations of voter fraud in connection with Harry S. Truman. He also addresses Truman's relationship with Thomas J. Pendergast.

Date: 
June 25th 1940

Letter from Granville A. Richart to Sam M. Wear in which Richart thanks Wear for Wear's letter of congratulations regarding Richart's nomination. He comments that, "my candidacy was opposed by the political prostitutes, gamblers, the city administration and the Kansas City Star."

Date: 
August 14th 1940

Letter from Dan L. Fennell regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Fennell writes that he has known Higgins since high school and later worked with him while serving as president of the Kansas City Safety Council, and states his belief that Higgins is "entirely repentant" and intends to become "a useful and law abiding member of the community." Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Date: 
August 17th 1940

Letter from Lewis J. Grout, Chief U.S. Probation Officer, to Myrl E. Alexander, Acting Parole Executive with the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Grout summarizes Pendergast's case, noting he plead guilty to multiple charges of income tax evasion, and notes that there are special conditions of probation, including paying a fine and back taxes. Grout also draws attention to editorials from the May 22, 1939 edition of the Kansas City Star and the May 23, 1939 edition of the Kansas City Times.

Date: 
May 24th 1939

Memorandum regarding Joe DiGiovanni's criminal history, listing charges beginning with a 1920 Prohibition violation to which he plead guilty, and spanning through 1930. DiGiovanni was charged with numerous Prohibition and other liquor violations.

Date: 
September 7th 1950

Photographs and quotes from Tony Gizzo, Kansas City mafia figure, during his testimony before the U.S. Senate Special Committee to Investigate Organized Crime in Interstate Commerce, popularly known as the Kefauver Committee. Gizzo is quoted as saying "Senator, I wish to hell you would tell me what the Mafia is. I never even heard of it."

Date: 
1950

Letter labeled "PERSONAL" from S. H. Toucey to Senator Estes Kefauver, regarding his Special Committee to Investigate Organized Crime in Interstate Commerce. Toucey writes that he doesn't "like CRIME anymore than the United States Senate do," and goes on to summarize his view of election fraud andand insurance scandals in Kansas City and Jackson County.

Date: 
July 14th 1950

First issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a statement on the newspaper's objective, maintaining that the newspaper is not against any certain political party or vice, but that it is simply for "good government". Featured articles include: “Council Passes Cab Ordinance” (pp. 2 & 4) discussing councilman Frank H. Backstrom’s reaction to the ordinance and detailing other ordinances appropriating bond funds.; "Adult Education--A Fine Work" (pp.

Date: 
January 11th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a photo and article, continued on page 8, about "Dr. Schorer," a 54-year old pediatric physician appointed by Henry McElroy as the city's Director of Health, born in Wisconsin in 1881 and coming to Kansas City in 1913. Other featured articles include: “Politics and Hogs” (p. 2), about local hotels and restaurants selling their garbage to be used as hog feed and interference by the Kansas City Collection Company; “’S Not ‘N Eagle—‘S ‘N Owl” (p.

Date: 
April 19th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the effusive spending of city funds on the Kansas City Zoo, comparing the luxurious living conditions of a tiger there to many thousands of Kansas Citians with very poor housing and utilities, etc., including illustrative photos. Other featured articles include: “Arson Aylor” (p.

Date: 
June 14th 1935

Form letter from Joseph B. Shannon to the people of Kansas City in which Shannon provides a list and figures documenting the rise of crime and police brutality in Kansas City from 1921-24 with the police department controlled by Matthew Foster and The Kansas City Star. In the postscript, Shannon alleges that policemen were ordered to "pay monthly political assessments" and states that the past "four years of police administration cost the taxpayers of Kansas City $5,232,691.74."

Date: 
March 19th 1925

Political attack advertisement that documents Kansas City Star owner August F. Seested's political exploits for personal gain in local real estate. This document was produced to discourage Kansas Citians from voting for Kansas City Police Commissioner Matthew Foster, the Republican candidate for mayor.

Date: 
March 26th 1922

Three excerpts from Republican sources that document police brutality present in the Kansas City Police Department. Excerpts include an editorial from the Kansas City Star from August 30, 1921, a court opinion by Judge Thad B. Landon, and a statement from Attorney R. R. Brewster published on September 4, 1921. This broadside was produced to discourage Kansas Citians from voting for Kansas City Police Commissioner Matthew Foster, the Republican candidate for mayor.

Date: 
1922

Clipping from the Kansas City Journal-Post that criticizes both candidates for mayor: Matthew Foster and Frank H. Cromwell. Foster, a Republican backed by the Kansas City Star, is described as being overzealous in his pursuit as Kansas City police commissioner to "stamp out vice and lawlessness". Cromwell, on the other hand, is accused of being backed by the Kansas City Democratic machine. The Journal-Post urges Kansas City to vote and make their voice heard.

Date: 
April 3rd 1922

Cartoon from the Kansas City Star after the local election on March 25, 1930. The drawing depicts James P. Aylward driving a street sweeper with Bryce B. Smith, Henry F. McElroy, Alfred N. Gossett, Thomas J. Pendergast, Joseph B. Shannon, and Casimir J. Welch. The caption reads, "The Democratic Machine makes a clean sweep in our recent municipal election."

Date: 
March 30th 1930

Clipping from an article on Tom Pendergast entitled "Portrait of 'The Boss'" in the Kansas City Star on February 28, 1932. This drawing depicts people in line to meet with Thomas J. Pendergast for employment or other favors.

Date: 
February 28th 1932

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.