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Photograph of the residence of Anna H. Jones, located at 2444 Montgall Avenue, Kansas City, Missouri. This vantage point faces west on Montgall Avenue, just north of 25th Street.

Photograph of the Paseo Baptist Church Adult Choir under the direction of Mrs. D. A. Holmes. This photograph was taken by Stiger photo studio facing east towards the main entrance to Paseo Baptist Church.

Date: 
July 16th 1939

Photograph of the Paseo Baptist Church congregation posed in celebration of the church's fifty-sixth anniversary. This photograph was taken facing east towards the main entrance of Paseo Baptist Church.

Date: 
August 26th 1940

Photograph of Kansas City ministers [possibly as part of a New Era District meeting] with leaders of the Women's Missionary Union posed outside of the main entrance to the Paseo Baptist Church. Included in the picture are Rev. D. A. Holmes, Rev. C. S Scott, Rev. S. S. Stamps, Rev. I. H. Henderson, Jr., Rev. Hollins, Mrs. Leeks, Carolyn Ealy, Ethel K. Thomas, Mrs. L. P. Payne, Georgia Craft, Lillie Livingston, Audra Malone, Emma Lawson, and Mary Bostic. This photograph was taken sometime after 1931 when the Paseo Baptist Church was completed.

Architectural drawing depicting a rendering created by J. M. Felt & Company Architects of a new church for the Vine Street Baptist Church, Kansas City, Missouri. This draft was created shortly before 1931 when this new building was completed and the church was renamed Paseo Baptist Church.

Invitiation from the Sewing Circle of Paseo Baptist Church presenting Western Seminary students in two dramatic plays on Thursday, December 14, 1939.

Date: 
December 14th 1939

Letter from Tom Pendergast to Lloyd C. Stark, asking him to give special consideration to Mart Barrons and ensure that he gets the advertising business for the Apple Association.

Date: 
June 5th 1933

Letter from M. Ross to Governor Park asking on behalf of Tom Pendergast that Park write to President Roosevelt about releasing federal Missouri River improvement funds.

Date: 
August 18th 1933

A letter from Ready Mixed Concrete Company Vice President R. P. Lyons to Senator Harry S. Truman. Lyons informs Truman that Independence Republican Lyle Weeks was awarded a contracting job by Kansas City and requests that Truman suggest to Weeks to use Ready Mixed Concrete Company concrete for the job. The Ready Mixed Concrete Company was closely associated with the Pendergast Machine.

Date: 
October 31st 1941

Agreement between R. P. Lyons, vice president of Ready Mixed Concrete Company, and the United States Board of Parole, stating that Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, will be employed "steadily in the occupation of President" of Ready Mixed Concrete upon his parole, and agreeing to report to U.S. Probation Officer Lewis Grout should Pendergast's work become unsatisfactory. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S.

Date: 
October 28th 1939

Interview with Juan and Pascual Madrigal by Laurie Bretz as part of the Trabajo y Cultura (Work & Culture) Project documenting the Kansas City, Kansas, Hispanic community. The men discuss coming to Kansas City in 1925 after the Mexican Revolution, attending the Clara Barton School that served the Mexican community, working for the Santa Fe railroad and the local ice plant, and unionization efforts in hopes of improving working hours and wages.

Date: 
April 29th 1980

Photograph of students outside the Clara Barton School. The school served the Mexican community of Kansas City, Kansas, from the 1920s until it was damaged by flooding in 1951.

Photograph of a student costumed for a play at Clara Barton School. The school served the Mexican community of Kansas City, Kansas, from the 1920s until it was damaged by flooding in 1951.

Telegram from Lucile Bluford to University of Missouri President F. A. Middlebush regarding her denial of admission to the university's journalism school. She notes that she was referred to Lincoln University, the state's black university, but that they offer no journalism courses. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism.

Date: 
September 14th 1939

Letter from Lucile Bluford to University of Missouri registrar S. W. Canada, frustrated because she has not received a reply to her telegram of February 11. She writes that, while Canada insists he has no authority to admit her to the university, other MU officials report that he is the sole authority on such matters. She reiterates that Lincoln University offers no journalism courses, leading her to demand admission to the University of Missouri, and includes a check for $41.50 to cover student fees for the coming semester.

Date: 
February 16th 1941

Telegram from Lucile Bluford to University of Missouri President Frederick A. Middlebush, stating that university registrar has rejected her application for admission for six straight semesters due to her race, despite her credits having previously been acceptable, and reiterating that Lincoln University does not offer a journalism program. She requests that Middlebush "extend democracy in our own state" at a time that "negro boys as well as white are about to sacrifice their lives on the battlefield" in defense of democracy.

Date: 
September 19th 1941

Letter from Lucile Bluford to University of Missouri registrar S. W. Canada, insisting upon admission to the University of Missouri as Lincoln University will not offer a journalism program for the coming fall semester.

Date: 
August 21st 1941

Letter from Lucile Bluford to Lincoln University president Dr. Sherman D. Scruggs that she asks to be considered as a standing application to the university as a graduate student in journalism.

Date: 
April 28th 1942

Letter from Lucile Bluford to University of Missouri registrar S. W. Canada that she asks to be considered as a standing application to the university as a graduate student in journalism. Bluford writes that Canada's attorney William S. Hogsett used "open appeals to race prejudice" in federal court, and refuses to let that thwart her career.

Date: 
April 28th 1942

Circa 1928 photograph with full frontal and side view of Willys-Overland, Incorporated; located at the southeast corner of Grand Avenue and 25th Street. Sign also says Willys Knight Overland and another sign on the building reads Holzmark Motor Company. This vantage point faces east at the intersection of 25th and Grand.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.