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Displaying 1 - 20 of 27

A color glass plate positive photograph of a hawtorn (crataegus) tree in bloom in the north central section of Penn Valley Park. This vantage point faces north towards downtown Kansas City, Missouri and shows Liberty Memorial in the right background.

Date: 
April 29th 1941

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen provides intelligence that if a Missourian were to be appointed as a new judge on the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals, it would be Charlie Carr. Kitchen refuses to give up on the endeavor as it may be June 1941 before the position is filled.

Date: 
February 14th 1941

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen provides detailed intelligence concerning the appointment of a new judge position on the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. Kitchen believes that the probability of a Iowan appointment to the court is now less likely, and that Missourian Charlie Carr might have a more favorable chance.

Date: 
May 7th 1941

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen provides suggestions on how to secure Charlie Carr as the new judge of the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. Kitchen suggests Truman talks to his close friends, Senator Byrnes and Attorney General Jackson, both of which are recent appointments to the Supreme Court. Kitchen provides reasons why Byrnes and Jackson might want to help them in their efforts.

Date: 
June 18th 1941

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses a number of Missouri political matters including possible state chairman replacements. He also provides intelligence concerning a secret political meeting held in the Lake of the Ozarks, Missouri. In attendance were Lloyd C. Stark, J. D. James, William E. Kemp, Edgar Shook, Andrew Murphy, et al..

Date: 
August 19th 1941

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen provides details on the personal and financial situation of Mrs. Fred Chambers and asks Truman to do what he can to get her a job.

Date: 
October 1st 1941

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen shares his on Robert Walton's sentiment concerning the Missouri Democratic Party. They believe the party in Missouri looks to Truman to save and reorganize it ahead of the 1942 election.

Date: 
October 2nd 1941

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen concedes that it is not yet time to reorganize the Missouri Democratic Party. Kitchen then provides intelligence concerning Lloyd C. Stark and the recent Women's Democratic Clubs convention in Jefferson City, Missouri. He then discusses a proposed Democratic "harmony" dinner in Jefferson City and mentions Jim Aylward's recent comments towards Truman.

Date: 
October 23rd 1941

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen updates Truman on the recent "Democratic pow-wow" in Jefferson City, Missouri.

Date: 
December 12th 1941

Letter from Kansas City realtor Myron A. King to Senator Harry S. Truman. King informs Truman on King's and Lou Holland's involvement in choosing a site for a new Kansas City airport. King discusses the two locations: the Grandview site and the Greenwood site.

Date: 
June 6th 1941

Letter from Shannon C. Douglass to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Douglass updates Truman on the selection of a new Kansas City airport. The two site candidates are located in Grandview and Greenwood, Missouri.

Date: 
May 26th 1941

Letter from Kansas City attorney Joe W. McQueen to Senator Harry S. Truman. McQueen inquires what may be done to outfit the Fairfax Aviation School with the proper educational equipment to prepare workmen for employment in federal defense manufacturing.

Date: 
May 24th 1941

Letter from Eugene P. Donnelly to Sam M. Wear in which Donnelly discusses the effect imminent Governor Forrest C. Donnell will have on the upcoming St. Louis City Election that April. He also comments of the Jackson County Democratic Organziation: "We are growing daily in Kansas City and have the confidence of the people of Jackson County."

Date: 
February 19th 1941

Photograph of Robert E. O'Malley (left) and Thomas J. Pendergast (right). The caption on the back of the image reads, "KC 235368... (Chicago Bureau) PENDERGAST GETS TWO YEAR SENTENCE, KANSAS CITY, MO. T. J. Pendergast (right), former czar of Kansas City, and R. E. O'Malley in Kansas City federal court shortly before both were sentenced to serve two years in federal penitentiary in connection with Missouri fire insurance rate compromise. Both filed notices of appeal. List 5 YOUR CREDIT LINE MUST READ "ACME" 6-8-41."

Date: 
June 8th 1941

Postcard of the Hotel Continental, located at the northwest corner of Baltimore Avenue and 11th Street in downtown Kansas City, Missouri. The back of the postcard includes a short letter to be delivered in Kansas City, Missouri to Jay C. Barber.

Date: 
November 13th 1941

Postcard of the Court House (foreground) and City Hall (background) in Kansas City, Missouri at night. This vantage point faces north-northwest just east of the intersection of Locust and 13th Street. The back of the postcard includes a short letter from Frank Gilbert to Peggy Moore of Fremont, Nebraska.

Date: 
November 3rd 1941

Letter from U.S. District Court Clerk A. L. Arnold to attorney Carl R. Johnson, regarding Civil Action No. 42: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada, inquiring as to whether the plaintiff has yet filed an appeal. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and her effort to gain admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism, and repeated denials due to her race, lead to a a series of lawsuits that eventually reached the Missouri Supreme Court.

Date: 
January 18th 1941

Letter from William S. Hogsett to Charles H. Houston regarding issues of taxable costs in the Bluford vs. Canada case. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism. After repeated efforts to enter the program, and repeated denials due to her race, she filed a lawsuit against the university that eventually was heard before the Missouri Supreme Court.

Date: 
March 13th 1941

Letter from William S. Hogsett to Rubey M. Hulen, agreeing that the $65,000 state appropriation for Lincoln University be earmarked for a School of Journalism, though expressing disappointment that more funding would not be available for other departments. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism.

Date: 
June 2nd 1941

Letter from William S. Hogsett to University of Missouri registrar S. W. Canada, forwarding a copy of the Missouri Supreme Court opinion in the Bluford vs. Canada case.

Date: 
July 9th 1941

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.