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Letter from Governor Lloyd C. Stark to Hon. Fred Blair Townsend, regarding Missouri's delegation to the Democratic National Convention. Stark says he believes that "Missouri is safely in line with the Roosevelt forces."

Date: 
April 29th 1940

Letter signed "Executive Secretary" to Hon. Drew Pearson, regarding the Missouri delegation to the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. The letter says that, despite the efforts of the "anti-Roosevelt forces, headed by Missouri's Senior Senator" Bennett Clark and the Pendergast machine, the Missouri delegation to the convention "will be guided ... by a strongly worded resolution praising President Roosevelt's leadership," favored by Governor Stark.

Date: 
April 23rd 1940

Press release containing the test of a statement given by William Hirth, publisher of the Missouri Farmer and president of the Missouri Farmers' Association, regarding the state Democratic convention. Hirth reports that the recent "convention in St. Louis was the most shameful gathering of its kind in the history of Missouri," and describes animosity between Clark-Pendergast forces and Governor Lloyd C. Stark.

Date: 
April 21st 1940

Memo for the press containing a response from Governor Lloyd C. Stark to a report from the US Senate's Gillette Committee to Investigate Campaign Expenditures. Stark says the report proves that allegations against his camapign were "just another effort of the Pendergast remnants and their allies in the 'smear Stark movement' designed to put the Pendergast crowd back in control of Missouri."

Date: 
June 22nd 1940

Letter from William Hirth to Governor Lloyd C. Stark discussing the prospect of Colonel Whitten as U.S. District Attorney and the candidacy of Maurice Milligan for Senate. Hirth writes that Whitten "is not only a man of outstanding ability, ... but from the long fight he has made against the machine in Kansas City, I think he is richly entitled to" the office.

Date: 
May 6th 1940

Letter from William Hirth to Governor Lloyd C. Stark discussing the prospect of Colonel Whitten as U.S. District Attorney and the candidacy of Maurice Milligan for Senate. Hirth writes that Whitten "is not only a man of outstanding ability, ... but from the long fight he has made against the machine in Kansas City, I think he is richly entitled to" the office.

Date: 
May 6th 1940

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Westbrook Pegler, newspaper columnist, on September 13, 1940. Mitchell informs Pegler of Senator Carl Hatch's ties to Thomas J. Pendergast and Harry S. Truman.

Date: 
September 13th 1940

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses the 1940 election and public reception to Maurice M. Milligan's campaign against Truman. Kitchen then details information he received concerning a Securities and Exchange Commission investigation of Andy Murphy and the Union Electric Company.

Date: 
May 17th 1940

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses new developments on the appointment of a new judge for the Eight Circuit Court of Appeals. Kitchen inquires what might be happening in the Department of Justice concerning this appointment.

Date: 
November 19th 1940

Southeastern Missouri newspaper clipping reporting on Governor Lloyd C. Stark's campaign announcement for U.S. Senator of Missouri. The author favors Senator Harry S. Truman for reelection as he is believed to have a better chance of beating a Republican nominee over his Democratic rivals Stark and Maurice M. Milligan. The author then paints a favorable portrait of Truman and tells the reader to not fear his association with Pendergast, saying, "Don't be foolish enough to vote against him [Truman] just because Tom Pendergast was for him.

Date: 
April 19th 1940
KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.