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Letter from Edgar Shook to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on April 16, 1934. Shook agrees with Mitchell on the necessity of a Kansas City candidate for Senate that is not tied to the Pendergast machine. He then discusses possible candidates for said position. Despite the Pendergast machine victory during the recent Kansas City local election, Shook is confident that "the tragedies of election day sounded an endless knell to this machine."

Date: 
April 16th 1934

Letter from G. H. Foree to Ewing young Mitchell, Jr. on May 9, 1934. Foree warns of Republican attacks on the Democratic administration in power and requests information concerning candidates for U.S. Senator in Missouri.

Date: 
May 9th 1934

Letter from G. H. Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in which Foree discusses the possible outcome of the U.S. Senate campaign in Missouri. He predicts Bennett C. Clark will be "diplomatic enough and spineless enough in case Thurman [Truman] is nominated and elected... to get in the good graces of 'Boss Tom.'"

Date: 
May 21st 1934

Letter from G. H Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 14, 1934. Foree speculates how the current field of U.S. Senate candidates for Missouri formed and who will win at election. He comments, "This coming primary is not one in which the choice of Democracy will win- it will be Boss manipulated."

Date: 
June 14th 1934

Correspondence from Thomas Pendergast Jr. to Margaret Truman Daniel, likely dated after the 1973 publication of her biography about her father, Harry S. Truman. It is unclear if the note was ever delivered or if it remained in Pendergast Jr.'s possession. In it, Pendergast Jr. accuses Harry Truman and James M. Pendergast of betraying his father.

Letter from James A. Reed to Bennett C. Clark. Reed replies that he is shocked by the information in Clark's previous letter and asks to meet in person to discuss the matter.

Date: 
March 25th 1933

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides the latest information concerning Kansas City and Missouri politics: "I missed a call from [Joseph B.] Shannon... Jim P. [Pendergast] said he hoped I'd keep him here but I'm glad he's going home. He says [Lloyd C.] Stark will run against [Bennett C.] Clark and not against me."

Date: 
November 22nd 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides details on Clark and Truman's political maneuvering: "Clark said he was to see Tuck [Jacob] Milligan yesterday and that he'd rub a little salt on Stark. He thinks maybe we can get 'em all in the race."

Date: 
July 27th 1939

Essay documenting the role Ralph E. Truman and Olive L. Truman played in the 1934 U.S. Senatorial campaign in Missouri. Olive details how her and her husband helped Jacob L. Milligan with his campaign before learning that Ralph's cousin Harry S. Truman would enter as well. The two had committed themselves to the Milligan campaign and could not aid Harry. Olive also details tactics used by the Pendergast Organization during this campaign.

Date: 
June 9th 1964

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about President Franklin D. Roosevelt and “Tommy Wommy” Pendergast’s insistence on standing by the president, as well as other local leaders such as Truman and Shannon’s diplomatic efforts with the federal government. Portraits of of FDR and Pendergast are included. Other featured articles include: “Little Merchants” (p. 2), about children employed to sell magazines being exempt from state child labor laws; “President’s Birthday Funds (p.

Date: 
January 25th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, with a photo and description of Kansas City FBI agent Lieutenant William Gordon, "commended by J. Edgar Hoover," in an article about the crime-fighting operations of the Federal Bureau of Investigations and its relation to Kansas City crime. Sheriff Bash, Chief Coffey, Director Reppert, Chief of Detectives Thomas Higgins, and Lieutenant George Rayen are also discussed. Other featured articles include: “Journey to the K.C.

Date: 
February 8th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on pages 3 and 8, about the selling of merchandise stolen from Kansas merchants in Kansas City pawn shops, and description of the subsequent closing of small shops not tied to the Pendergast machine and sentencing of a black man to 40 years in jail in lieu of convicting the proprietor of a guilty shop at 9th and Main Streets, and other issues. Other featured articles include: “Fame!” (p.

Date: 
March 1st 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the apartments on the Country Club Plaza and Armour Boulevard managed by the Assured Rental Company (led by George Goldman and Herman Shapiro), in the city's "South Side," voting against the Pendergast ticket City Council nominees.

Date: 
June 7th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the Bond Advisory Committee of the Ten-Year Plan, made up of prominent Kansas Citians including R. Crosby Kemper and J. E. Woodmansee, and chaired by Conrad H. Mann. Other featured articles include: “The Sport of Kings” (p. 2), about the Riverside horse racing track and the machine-controlled gambling that takes place there; “Will They Be Able to Silence Mr. Bash?” (p.

Date: 
June 28th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the “lug,” “an involuntary or forced contribution to something a luckless employee isn’t nearly as interested in” as his and his family’s own welfare. Other featured articles include “T. J. and W. T.” (page 2), about patching up of differences between William Kemper, Sr. ("Democratic national committeeman for Missouri") and Tom Pendergast (Democratic No.

Date: 
July 12th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a notice that Future’s publishers plan to temporarily suspend publication to reorganize the paper, and also note that “youth is interested and youth is organizing,” and “FUTURE is their paper.” Other featured articles include: “Why Charge a Cover?” (p.

Date: 
July 19th 1935

Program from the edication ceremony of the new United States Court House and Post Office on Pershing Road. Federal judge Merrill E. Otis presided over the event, with guests including Senator Bennett "Champ" Clark, Senator Harry Truman, and Governor Lloyd C. Stark. Music was provided by the Letter Carriers' Band, and the event was broadcast by WDAF Radio. The program also includes photographs and histories of earlier Kansas City federal buildings, and a list of the agencies that will be housed in the new facility.

Date: 
October 5th 1939

Clipping from Time (magazine) on February 22, 1937 detailing the election fraud that occured in Kansas City during the 1936 General Election. The article features extended quotes from Judge Albert L. Reeves concerning the election fraud, including the following: "We can't surrender the ballot boxes to thugs, gangsters and plug-uglies who patrol the streets with machine guns. We can't stand for that any longer." The article then provides a history of political corruption in Kansas City through 1936.

Date: 
February 22nd 1937

Clipping showing James M. Pendergast, Bennett Champ Clark, and Joe Shannon (left to right) conversing to together. The caption implies that these men intend to split the vote into three during the Democratic primary in Missouri so as to insure that their preferred candidate wins.

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.