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Letter from Mrs. Louis M. Wilson to Governor Lloyd C. Stark prior to his election as Missouri governor, providing advice about his 1936 campaign. Regarding the Pendergast machine, she advises "you have to have them to win."

Date: 
May 14th 1935

Letter from A. Ross Hill to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in which Hill discusses prospective candidates for U.S. Senate in Missouri. With Harry S. Truman and Jacob L. Milligan being the two most likely Democratic candidates, Hill prefers Milligan for his anti-Pendergast stance.

Date: 
May 8th 1934

Letter from G. H. Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in which Foree discusses the possible outcome of the U.S. Senate campaign in Missouri. He predicts Bennett C. Clark will be "diplomatic enough and spineless enough in case Thurman [Truman] is nominated and elected... to get in the good graces of 'Boss Tom.'"

Date: 
May 21st 1934

A ten page typewritten history of Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr.'s political career in relation to Missouri politics through 1935 when the President of the United States removed him from office.

Date: 
1936

Letter from Lue C. Lozier to his father Ralph F. Lozier in which Lue updates Ralph on Thomas J. Pendergast's response to Ralph's letter. Lue relates the list of people Pendergast is currently willing to support for the 1934 U.S. Senate campaign. Lue then provides insight on the current intentions and patronage of those people, and offers advise of Ralph's next actions.

Date: 
January 1934

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to Charles M. Howell in which Ralph explains why Charles should drop out of his Senate campaign race so that Ralph may enter with Pendergast's support.

Date: 
January 24th 1934

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to Katherine W. Halterman. Lozier informs Katherine that in the event Charles M. Howell did not run for Senate, T. J. Pendergast said that he would support Lozier in his campaign for the Senate. He then provides an analysis of the Missouri campaign for U.S. Senate, concluding that, "No Kansas City man can be nominated."

Date: 
January 24th 1934

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier, Jr. to his father Ralph F. Lozier. Ralph, Jr. informs Ralph, Sr. of the death of W. D. Penny and suggests that he announces his Senate campaign without the support of T. J. Pendergast. Thus, Charles M. Howell will drop out of his campaign, leaving Pendergast to support Ralph, Sr.

Date: 
February 1st 1934

Letter from Bennett C. Clark to James A. Reed. Clark suggests that Reed convinces Pendergast to support Elmer Jones instead of H. O. Maxey or Gene Nelson as Missouri Speaker of the House.

Date: 
December 20th 1930

Letter from James A. Reed to Bennett C. Clark. Reed agrees with Clark in support of Elmer Jones as Missouri Speaker of the House. However, Reed says that he has not yet been able to speak with Thomas J. Pendergast on the matter.

Date: 
December 26th 1930

Letter from Bennett C. Clark to James A. Reed. Clark discusses a Redistricting Bill and asks Reed to ask for Thomas J. Pendergast's input on the matter.

Date: 
March 13th 1931

Letter from James A. Reed to Bennett C. Clark. Reed states that he is not sure what he can accomplish concerning the Redistricting Bill, but says that he will speak with Thomas J. Pendergast on the matter. Reed then explains rumors of his endorsement of Harry Hawes.

Date: 
March 26th 1931

Letter from Bennett C. Clark to James A. Reed. Clark discusses his announcement of his U.S. Senator campaign and a meeting he had with Thomas J. Pendergast. He mentions that Pendergast said he "uniformly pursued the rule of supporting any Kansas City candidate who did not happen to be personally offensive" to him.

Date: 
May 27th 1931

Letter from Bennett C. Clark to James A. Reed in which he expresses his dismay of Reed's neutrality between Charles M. Howell and Clark's U.S. Senate campaign.

Date: 
December 28th 1931

Letter from James A. Reed to Bennett C. Clark in which Reed discusses his meetings with Ike Dunlap and Ed Villmoare. Reed mentions that Dunlap showed him a letter from President Roosevelt. In it, Roosevelt expresses his hope to meet with Thomas J. Pendergast soon.

Date: 
August 16th 1932

Letter from Bennett C. Clark to James A. Reed in which he discusses a recent meeting with James A. Farley. In this meeting, Farley had asked if it was okay for Thomas J. Pendergast to control Kansas City appointments. Clark firmly opposed this and mentions that Farley divulged that "the President himself at Albany had promised this patronage to Pendergast before the convention!"

Date: 
March 22nd 1933

Letter from James A. Reed to Bennett C. Clark. Reed replies that he is shocked by the information in Clark's previous letter and asks to meet in person to discuss the matter.

Date: 
March 25th 1933

Letter from Bennett C. Clark to James A. Reed in which Clark sends his regrets for not being able to visit Reed while in Missouri. He then discusses various appointments to state and federal positions.

Date: 
July 20th 1933

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the Bond Advisory Committee of the Ten-Year Plan, made up of prominent Kansas Citians including R. Crosby Kemper and J. E. Woodmansee, and chaired by Conrad H. Mann. Other featured articles include: “The Sport of Kings” (p. 2), about the Riverside horse racing track and the machine-controlled gambling that takes place there; “Will They Be Able to Silence Mr. Bash?” (p.

Date: 
June 28th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the “lug,” “an involuntary or forced contribution to something a luckless employee isn’t nearly as interested in” as his and his family’s own welfare. Other featured articles include “T. J. and W. T.” (page 2), about patching up of differences between William Kemper, Sr. ("Democratic national committeeman for Missouri") and Tom Pendergast (Democratic No.

Date: 
July 12th 1935
KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.