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Letter from Walker C. Johnson to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, lauding Stark for his "stand for RIGHT in the State of M[issouri]." He writes that many of his county opposed Stark due to his Pendergast support, but that now "most of them are behind you on this [war] to rid the State of the rascals in elections." He also describes losing his job due to political affiliation.

Date: 
June 21st 1938

Letter from Ruth Vawter to Governor Lloyd C. Stark. Vawter writes regarding Mrs. Marie S. Barnhill, former Area Supervisor of Women's Work for the WPA in Webster County. Barnhill's successor "is making her brags that she can deliver Saline County in the palm of her hand to the Organization for Judge Billings," and Vawter suggests that Barnhill, who is not currently allied to either Supreme Court candidate, could support Douglas "should [Stark] be able to help her."

Date: 
June 10th 1938

Letter from Walker C. Johnson to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, lauding Stark for his "stand for RIGHT in the State of M[issouri]." He writes that many of his county opposed Stark due to his Pendergast support, but that now "most of them are behind you on this [war] to rid the State of the rascals in elections." He also describes losing his job due to political affiliation.

Date: 
June 21st 1938

Letter from Walker C. Johnson to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, expressing happiness at James Douglas winning the Missouri Supreme Court election, but describing further corruption to be eliminated in his county and WPA. He describes a WPA foreman that other workers call "Little Tom" passing out campaign information for Billings in advance of the election.

Date: 
August 4th 1938

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his latest political maneuvers with Bennett C. Clark: "Mr. Clark and I have had a time trying to get to the W.P.A. office to recommend a man for [Matthew S.] Murray's place. It looks as if they would really put poor old Murray in the jug."

Date: 
October 25th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his endeavor to select the new Kansas City W.P.A. Director and then comments about those affiliated with the Pendergast machine: "Mr. [Matthew S.] Murray, Mr. [Henry F.] McElroy, Mr. [Otto P.] Higgins, and even Mr. [Tom] P. himself probably would pay all the ill-gotten loot they took for my position and clear conscience."

Date: 
October 27th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman tells Bess of his meeting with President Roosevelt, Bennett C. Clark, and Clarence Cannon concerning relief for flood victims. Truman adds that, "I had a chance to tell Mr. Roosevelt what I thought of Mr. Mitchell. He very readily agreed with me."

Date: 
June 19th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on pages 4 and 8, about the "anti-machine speech" by Missouri state representative J. A. Gray broadcast "over station WOS in Jefferson City," Missouri, cut off in mid-transmission after scathing indictments of Tom Pendergast, with a copy of the speech in full. Other featured articles include: “Lunch-hooks Out of the Cookie Jar” (p.

Date: 
May 10th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, describing the inequality of property tax assessments throughout Jackson County and other costs of homeownership. Other featured articles include: “He Beats the Rap but You Take It” (p.

Date: 
May 17th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the escape from federal police in Kansas City of Sam Randazzo, "a St. Louis gangster" being released from Leavenworth, with the help of police officials Otto Higgins and Jeff Rayen. Other featured articles include: “Patriots Go to Riverside” (p.

Date: 
May 24th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the apartments on the Country Club Plaza and Armour Boulevard managed by the Assured Rental Company (led by George Goldman and Herman Shapiro), in the city's "South Side," voting against the Pendergast ticket City Council nominees.

Date: 
June 7th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about J. C. Nichols and his city planning projects in Kansas City with the Country Club residential district and Country Club Plaza shopping center, etc., including a photo of Nichols. Other featured articles include: “To Better Serve His Clients” (p.

Date: 
June 21st 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the Bond Advisory Committee of the Ten-Year Plan, made up of prominent Kansas Citians including R. Crosby Kemper and J. E. Woodmansee, and chaired by Conrad H. Mann. Other featured articles include: “The Sport of Kings” (p. 2), about the Riverside horse racing track and the machine-controlled gambling that takes place there; “Will They Be Able to Silence Mr. Bash?” (p.

Date: 
June 28th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the “lug,” “an involuntary or forced contribution to something a luckless employee isn’t nearly as interested in” as his and his family’s own welfare. Other featured articles include “T. J. and W. T.” (page 2), about patching up of differences between William Kemper, Sr. ("Democratic national committeeman for Missouri") and Tom Pendergast (Democratic No.

Date: 
July 12th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a notice that Future’s publishers plan to temporarily suspend publication to reorganize the paper, and also note that “youth is interested and youth is organizing,” and “FUTURE is their paper.” Other featured articles include: “Why Charge a Cover?” (p.

Date: 
July 19th 1935
KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.