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Letter from Charles L. Dunham to Jesse Barrett describing his political activities over the years and his opposition to the Pendergast Machine in Kansas City.

Date: 
April 11th 1938

Letter from A. Ross Hill to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in which Hill discusses prospective candidates for U.S. Senate in Missouri. With Harry S. Truman and Jacob L. Milligan being the two most likely Democratic candidates, Hill prefers Milligan for his anti-Pendergast stance.

Date: 
May 8th 1934

Letter from G. H. Foree to Ewing young Mitchell, Jr. on May 9, 1934. Foree warns of Republican attacks on the Democratic administration in power and requests information concerning candidates for U.S. Senator in Missouri.

Date: 
May 9th 1934

Letter from T. O'Donnell to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on May 20, 1934. O'Donnell comments on the Democratic candidates in the 1934 campaign for U.S. Senator of Missouri. He implicates Harry S. Truman, saying he "has been so faithful in following the dictates of the political machine, that they have promoted him and now are trying to name him senator from this state, knowing well that the machine interests will never suffer from his acts."

Date: 
May 20th 1934

Letter from G. H. Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in which Foree discusses the possible outcome of the U.S. Senate campaign in Missouri. He predicts Bennett C. Clark will be "diplomatic enough and spineless enough in case Thurman [Truman] is nominated and elected... to get in the good graces of 'Boss Tom.'"

Date: 
May 21st 1934

Letter from C. W. Greenwade to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 4, 1934. Greenwade inquires what candidate for U.S. Senate in Missouri he should openly support and comments that he believes John J. Cochran will when the primary.

Date: 
June 4th 1934

Letter from G. H Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 14, 1934. Foree speculates how the current field of U.S. Senate candidates for Missouri formed and who will win at election. He comments, "This coming primary is not one in which the choice of Democracy will win- it will be Boss manipulated."

Date: 
June 14th 1934

Letter from G. H. Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 26, 1934. Foree reports on John J. Cochran's political meeting in St. Louis of the previous evening and on Cochran's projected polling in St. Louis. He recounts, "They are claiming 10 to 1 of all the combined votes of [Jacob L.] Milligan and [Harry S.] Truman in the city." Foree also mentions that Cochran recently traveled to Kansas City to meet with Thomas J. Pendergast.

Date: 
June 26th 1934

Letter from C. W. Greenwade to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 30, 1934. Greenwade reports that Maurice M. Milligan, Jacob L. Milligan, et al. would speak with Bennett C. Clark about appointing Greenwade to Post Master.

Date: 
June 30th 1934

Letter from A. Ross Hill to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on July 18, 1934. Hill reports from Kansas City on a Jacob L. Milligan campaign event, the aftermath of John Lazia's death, and campaign speeches against Harry S. Truman.

Date: 
July 18th 1934

Letter from an unknown author (possibly Martin J. Collins of St. Louis, Missouri) to "Bob" on July 23, 1934, regarding the U.S. Senate race in Missouri. The author comments that Harry S. Truman, John J. Cochran, and Jacob L. Milligan are all campaigning to undecided voters in upstate, rural Missouri.

Date: 
July 23rd 1934

Letter from T. O'Donnell to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on December 5, 1934. O'Donnell reports that the St. Louis Star decided not to report the information on the Pendergast machine that O'Donnell provided to them. He also comments on the aftermath of the 1934 election and inquires if Mitchell could place him in an administrative position.

Date: 
December 5th 1934

Letter from Lue C. Lozier to his father Ralph F. Lozier in which Lue updates Ralph on Thomas J. Pendergast's response to Ralph's letter. Lue relates the list of people Pendergast is currently willing to support for the 1934 U.S. Senate campaign. Lue then provides insight on the current intentions and patronage of those people, and offers advise of Ralph's next actions.

Date: 
January 1934

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to Charles M. Howell in which Ralph explains why Charles should drop out of his Senate campaign race so that Ralph may enter with Pendergast's support.

Date: 
January 24th 1934

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to Katherine W. Halterman. Lozier informs Katherine that in the event Charles M. Howell did not run for Senate, T. J. Pendergast said that he would support Lozier in his campaign for the Senate. He then provides an analysis of the Missouri campaign for U.S. Senate, concluding that, "No Kansas City man can be nominated."

Date: 
January 24th 1934

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier, Jr. to his father Ralph F. Lozier. Ralph, Jr. informs Ralph, Sr. of the death of W. D. Penny and suggests that he announces his Senate campaign without the support of T. J. Pendergast. Thus, Charles M. Howell will drop out of his campaign, leaving Pendergast to support Ralph, Sr.

Date: 
February 1st 1934

Letter from R. M. Livesay to Ralph F. Lozier in which Livesay suggests Lozier make a public statement as to his intentions for candidacy in Congress. He then discusses the Postermaster position in Versailles, Missouri.

Date: 
April 28th 1934

Letter from lawyer Scott R. Timmons to Ralph F. Lozier. Timmons informs Lozier of his meetings with Roy A. Roberts, Katherine W. Halterman, John Barker, John Dalton, and Lozier's sons. These meetings involved discussion of Lozier's proposed candidacy for the 1934 U.S. Senate.

Date: 
May 1st 1934

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to Katherine W. Halterman in which he expresses his regret that Pendergast retracted his support for Lozier's U.S. Senate candidacy. He comments that, "the Missouri Democracy will not take Judge Truman's candidacy seriously," and believes that Jacob L. "Tuck" Milligan will win.

Date: 
May 20th 1934

Correspondence from Thomas Pendergast Jr. to Margaret Truman Daniel, likely dated after the 1973 publication of her biography about her father, Harry S. Truman. It is unclear if the note was ever delivered or if it remained in Pendergast Jr.'s possession. In it, Pendergast Jr. accuses Harry Truman and James M. Pendergast of betraying his father.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.