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Statement regarding the U.S. Supreme Court case Missouri ex rel. Gaines v. Canada, reporting that the Court has not yet made a final decision in the case, and noting that the state established Lincoln University as "a separate educational system for the negro race." Lloyd Gaines, a young black Missouri man, sought admission to the University of Missouri's law school and was rejected on the basis of his race. The case eventually reached the Supreme Court, which decided in December 1938 that if only one school existed, students of all races must be admitted.

Date: 
January 30th 1939

Letter from S. W. Canada, University of Missouri registrar, to Lucile Bluford, regarding her application to the university. He writes that she was accepted prior to the university learning of her race, and notes that "if such fact had been known then you would have been immediately advised ... that you could not be admitted." He also writes that the decision in the Lloyd Gaines case at the Supreme Court has not yet been finalized and thus does not impact their admissions decisions.

Date: 
February 4th 1939

Telegram from University of Missouri Registrar S. W. Canada to Lucile Bluford, stating that he has no authority to admit her to the university. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism. After repeated efforts to enter the program, and repeated denials due to her race, she filed a lawsuit against the university that eventually was heard before the Missouri Supreme Court.

Date: 
September 14th 1939

Memo from University of Missouri registrar S. W. Canada to university president F. A. Middlebush, forwarding a copy of a letter from and reply to Lucile Bluford, which he writes that he has also forwarded to attorney Nick Cave. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism. After repeated efforts to enter the program, and repeated denials due to her race, she filed a lawsuit against the university that eventually was heard before the Missouri Supreme Court.

Date: 
February 4th 1939

Letter from attorney Nick T. Cave to University of Missouri President Frederick A. Middlebush, regarding NAACP attorney Sidney Redmond's inquire about the status of Lucile Bluford's application to the university. He writes to concur with Jack Murray's suggested reply, and to reiterate that Bluford has knowledge of her correspondence, rejected her admission, with registrar S. W. Canada. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism.

Date: 
October 7th 1939

Letter from attorney William S. Hogsett to University of Missouri President Frederick A. Middlebush, regarding the issue of whether or not Lucile Bluford's application to the university was ever dealt with by the university's Board of Curators.

Date: 
October 6th 1939

Memorandum recounting a meeting with Lucile Bluford as recounted by S. W. Canada, registrar at the University of Missouri. Canada writes that Bluford visited his office the afternoon of February 5, 1941, with another woman, to follow up on her telegram reporting that Lincoln University offered no journalism coursework and thus is not a substite for University of Missouri's School of Journalism. She requests admission to the MU program, and Canada reiterates that he has no authority to offer her admission.

Date: 
February 5th 1941

Memo from University of Missouri registrar S. W. Canada to university president Frederick A. Middlebush, forwarding a recounting of an in-person conversation with Lucile Bluford along with other communications from her regarding her attempt to gain admission to the university during the second semester of the 1940/1941 school year. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism.

Date: 
February 21st 1941

Letter from William Hogsett to University of Missouri President Frederick A. Middlebush regarding the Bluford vs. Canada trial. Hogsett gives thanks to Lee-Carl Overstreet, S. W. Canada, and Dean Martin for their assistance in the trial, abnd notes that their case has been submitted to the circuit court and they should expect a decision shortly. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism.

Date: 
February 13th 1940

Telegram from Lucile Bluford to University of Missouri registrar S. W. Canada, stating that she feels it is unfair she has to continue to wait to enroll in graduate journalism courses after two years of attempting to gain admission, and reiterating that Lincoln University does not offer such coursework and insisting that MU admit her. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism.

Date: 
February 11th 1941

Letter from Lucile Bluford to University of Missouri registrar S. W. Canada, frustrated because she has not received a reply to her telegram of February 11. She writes that, while Canada insists he has no authority to admit her to the university, other MU officials report that he is the sole authority on such matters. She reiterates that Lincoln University offers no journalism courses, leading her to demand admission to the University of Missouri, and includes a check for $41.50 to cover student fees for the coming semester.

Date: 
February 16th 1941

Telegram from University of Missouri registrar S. W. Canada to Lucile Bluford, stating that he replied to her in person at his office the day before, prior to receipt of her telegram, and writes "my oral reply, namely that I have no authority to admit you, answers your communication." At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism.

Date: 
February 6th 1941

Letter from University of Missouri registrar S. W. Canada to Rubey Hulen, forwarding copies of Lucile Bluford's letter of February 16 and her check for student fees, and asking for his advice on his reply. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism. After repeated efforts to enter the program, and repeated denials due to her race, she filed a lawsuit against the university that eventually was heard before the Missouri Supreme Court.

Date: 
February 19th 1941

Letter from University of Missouri registrar S. W. Canada to Rubey Hulen, forwarding a copy of Lucile Bluford's telegram of February 11, and noting that, on Hulen's advice, he has not replied. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism. After repeated efforts to enter the program, and repeated denials due to her race, she filed a lawsuit against the university that eventually was heard before the Missouri Supreme Court.

Date: 
February 11th 1941

Letter from Lucile Bluford to University of Missouri registrar S. W. Canada, reporting that she has applied to Lincoln University for graduate work in journalism, but that they offer no journalism courses. She says there will therefore be applying to MU for the semester beginning Friday of that week. She requests he wire her at an address in Jefferson City with permission to enroll. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism.

Date: 
February 5th 1941

Letter from University of Missouri registrar S. W. Canada to Lucile Bluford, returning the check she mailed for student fees, as she "cannot be admitted to the Uiversity as heretofore informed." At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism. After repeated efforts to enter the program, and repeated denials due to her race, she filed a lawsuit against the university that eventually was heard before the Missouri Supreme Court.

Date: 
February 19th 1941

Letter from Charles H. Houston to William S. Hogsett regarding the Bluford vs. Canada case, writing that he has advised Lucile Bluford that she has "an independent cause of action" against S. W. Canada, University of Missouri registrar, due to his refusal to admit Bluford to the university's journalism program "in spite of his clear knowledge that there was no graduate work in journalism at Lincoln University." He advises Bluford to pursue that case and drop her appeal in the prior one.

Date: 
March 10th 1941

Letter from the secretary to University of Missouri President Frederick A. Middlebush to Leslie Cowan, secretary of the Board of Curators, forwarding a letter dated April 11 from S. W. Canada, university registrar, at Middlebush's request. The letter concerned dismissal of Lucile Bluford's case against the university. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism.

Date: 
April 15th 1941

Brief written by attorneys representing the University of Missouri and it's registrar, S. W. Canada, in Lucile Bluford's appeal in her suit attempting to gain admission to the university's graduate journalism program.

Date: 
1941

Letter from William S. Hogsett to University of Missouri registrar S. W. Canada, forwarding a copy of the Missouri Supreme Court opinion in the Bluford vs. Canada case.

Date: 
July 9th 1941

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.