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Letter from Musicians' Protective Union, Local 627 President William Shaw to Dr. Milton C. Lewis, President of the Council of Men's Clubs. Shaw on behalf of the Local No. 627 believe that despite the current depression, the current wages for musicians as set by the union are "not exhorbitant [sic]".

Date: 
May 26th 1932

Letter from Chester Franklin, editor of "The Call" calling his attention to an enclosed article about Tom Pendergast.

Date: 
January 18th 1936

Letter from T. O'Donnell to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in which O'Donnell informs Mitchell he will be sending a document describing "'Machine tactics' in Jackson County government." O'Donnell claims it would be useful information for any U.S. Senate candidate opposing the Pendergast Machine.

Date: 
June 10th 1934

Letter from James D. Pouncey of The Jackson County Bar Association to Senator Harry S. Truman. Pouncey attaches a resolution that the bar endorses Secretary of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Walter White in not accepting Truman's invitation to appear before the Truman Committee. Pouncey then provides four reasons for White's decision.

Date: 
July 22nd 1941

Letter from Alma Henderson and Dorothy H. Davis, co-chairmen of The Call's Club Greeting Committee, to members of local clubs regarding the possibility of placing Christmas greetings and other messages in the paper during the holiday season.

Date: 
November 11th 1938

Letter from Charles H. Houston to the clerk of the United States District Court for the Central Division of the Western District of Missouri, writing that he was enclosing a motion and order in the Lucile Bluford vs. S. W. Canada case, and asking that it is called to the attention of the court. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and her effort to gain admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism, and repeated denials due to her race, lead to a a series of lawsuits that eventually reached the Missouri Supreme Court.

Date: 
January 23rd 1941

Letter from plaintiff's attorney Carl R. Johnson to the U.S. District Court clerk regarding Civil Action No. 42: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada. Johnson writes to enclose the Notice of Appeal in the case, which they intend to appeal to the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. He also writes that Mr. T. B. Watkins, owner and operator of the Watkins Brothers funeral home, will be appeaing as surety in the case.

Date: 
December 4th 1940

Letter from plaintiff's attorney Carl R. Johnson to Judge John C. Collet in Civil Case No. 128: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada. Johnson writes that he is enclosing an amended petition in the case, and notes that the petition has already been forwarded to the defense counsel. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and her effort to gain admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism, and repeated denials due to her race, lead to a a series of lawsuits that eventually reached the Missouri Supreme Court.

Date: 
February 19th 1942

Letter from Kansas City Call editor Chester A. Franklin to University of Missouri president Frederick A. Middlebush, discussing the importance and impetus of the Lucile Bluford case against the university. Franklin writes that the suit is "an effort to make Missouri provide the equal schooling for Negroes ordered by the supreme court in the Gaines decision," and that "the state has evaded its duty" in meeting that standard.

Date: 
May 21st 1942
KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.