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Draft of a letter from Ralph F. Lozier to Thomas J. Pendergast. Lozier most politely reminds Pendergast that in the event Charles M. Howell did not run for Senate, Pendergast said that he would support Lozier in his campaign for the Senate. This heavily edited draft contains many strikethroughs in the pursuit of brevity.

Date: 
January 1934

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to Charles M. Howell in which Ralph explains why Charles should drop out of his Senate campaign race so that Ralph may enter with Pendergast's support.

Date: 
January 24th 1934

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to Thomas J. Pendergast. Lozier most politely reminds Pendergast that in the event Charles M. Howell did not run for Senate, Pendergast said that he would support Lozier in his campaign for the Senate.

Date: 
January 24th 1934

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to Katherine W. Halterman. Lozier informs Katherine that in the event Charles M. Howell did not run for Senate, T. J. Pendergast said that he would support Lozier in his campaign for the Senate. He then provides an analysis of the Missouri campaign for U.S. Senate, concluding that, "No Kansas City man can be nominated."

Date: 
January 24th 1934

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to Katherine W. Halterman. Lozier informs Katherine that his nomination for U.S. Senate is unlikely now that T. J. Pendergast supports James P. Aylward's campaign. He then provides an analysis of the Missouri campaign for U.S. Senate.

Date: 
February 22nd 1934

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to William Hirth in which he agrees with Hirth that James P. Aylward will likely enter the Sentorial race with the support of the Kansas City and St. Louis Democratic Organizations.

Date: 
February 27th 1934

Telegram from Ralph F. Lozier to his son Lue C. Lozier. Ralph informs Lue that if James P. Aylward declines candidacy for U.S. Senate, the Kansas City Democratic Organization will support Ralph.

Date: 
May 7th 1934

Telegram from Ralph F. Lozier to Charles M. Howell. Since James P. Alyward no longer intends to run for U.S. Senate, Lozier wants to contact T. J. Pendergast to discuss Lozier's candidacy. He does not know how he should contact him, so he asks Charles M. Howell how he should get in contact with Pendergast.

Date: 
May 8th 1934

Telegram from Ralph F. Lozier to Thomas J. Pendergast. Since James P. Alyward no longer intends to run for U.S. Senate, Lozier contacts T. J. Pendergast to discuss Lozier's candidacy. Lozier admits that he does not know whether he should contact Pendergast or if Pendergast would contact him. However, he did not want to seem indifferent to the matter, so he uses this telegram to initiate contact.

Date: 
May 9th 1934

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to his two sons, Ralph F. Lozier, Jr. and Lue C. Lozier. Lozier discusses the viability of Harry S. Truman, John J. Cochran, and Jacob L. "Tuck" Milligan as Democratic candidates for U.S. Senator in Missouri. He comments that Truman, "is without experience and training in subjects that a Senator is supposed to know something about."

Date: 
May 17th 1934

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to Katherine W. Halterman in which he expresses his regret that Pendergast retracted his support for Lozier's U.S. Senate candidacy. He comments that, "the Missouri Democracy will not take Judge Truman's candidacy seriously," and believes that Jacob L. "Tuck" Milligan will win.

Date: 
May 20th 1934

Telegram from Ralph F. Lozier to Charles M. Howell. After polling rural Missouri counties, Lozier rules that Truman would come in last place behind John J. Cochran and Jacob L. "Tuck" Milligan as Democratic candidate for U.S. Senator. Lozier believes that if he ran, "a very substantial majority of rural Democrats" would support him and Truman would withdraw. Thus, he inquires what candidate Pendergast would support if Truman withdraws.

Date: 
May 28th 1934

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to Lewis Goodson. He informs Goodson that he has written to Judge Henry F. McElroy and James M. Pendergast in support of Goodson's continued employment on the Kansas City Police force.

Date: 
April 8th 1932

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to Dave Morris of Nourse Oil Company in which Lozier affirms that he has voted against the oil tax. He then comments on Nourse Oil Company roadside advertisements claiming that "BUSINESS IS GOOD", despite Morris writing Lozier that the industry is hurting. Lozier claims that, "The Government has been doing business on a false basis for a number of years, spending money like a drunken sailor, and now has reached the pit of bankruptcy."

Date: 
April 11th 1932

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to John T. Barker in which Lozier explains Thomas J. Pendergast's support of Lozier in his 1932 U.S. Representative campaign. He also informs Barker of a political effort in Missouri to divide Democrats from Kansas City with those of rural Missouri.

Date: 
April 15th 1932

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to W. E. Barton of Houston, Missouri in which Lozier offers his condolences that Barton did not receive Thomas J. Pendergast's support of Barton's reelection. However, Lozier believes that the election will favor those already in office.

Date: 
July 27th 1932

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to Thomas J. Pendergast in which Lozier once again thanks Pendergast for his endorsement in Lozier's reelection to the U.S. House of Representatives. He then praises Pendergast's Kansas City Democratic Organization and states that he is forever indebted to Pendergast.

Date: 
July 28th 1932

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to C. E. O'Dell in which Lozier informs O'Dell that he can not send his recommendation of O'Dell to Thomas J. Pendergast. Instead, he suggests sending the recommendation for employment to Joseph B. Shannon or Pete Kelly.

Date: 
September 16th 1932

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to Clarence Cannon of Elsberry, Missouri. Lozier relates his political discussions with Thomas J. Pendergast, commenting on who might be adequate candidates for the following election.

Date: 
October 15th 1932

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to S. J. Payne in which Lozier informs Payne that he should not send his recommendation of Payne to Thomas J. Pendergast, as it "would do no good and might do harm." Instead, he suggests procuring a recommendation from Mr. Fleming or Mr. Taaffe of Pendergast's organization.

Date: 
November 23rd 1932
KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.