National Archives at College Park, Maryland

Displaying 49 - 60 of 123
Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Educational Department report for the United States Board of Parole for Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The document indicates that Pendergast had no enrollments in educational activities or correspondence courses. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Mattie Acock to President Franklin D. Roosevelt regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Acock writes asking for Roosevelt to support Pendergast's parole, and says that Governor Lloyd Stark is mad because Pendergast got former governor Guy B.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from James V. Bennett, Director of the Bureau of Prisons, to Robert Hudspeth, warden of the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Bennett writes regarding allegations made by Governor Lloyd Stark that Pendergast "was directing his political organization from Leavenworth," and his discussion about that issue with Elmer Irey, who works in Treasury Department law enforcement. Irey concluded that Stark was misinformed, and that Pendergast was not engaged in political activity from prison.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Morton I. Newell regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Newell writes that Higgins will "again become a useful citizen" and that he and his family "have suffered sufficiently to warrant any parole." Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from F. Spencer Johnson regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Johnson writes that Higgins is "capable and industrious," and has "been sufficiently punished." Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from attorney Alexander D. Saper regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Saper writes that he practiced law with Higgins between 1922 and 1934, and believes he was a "clear victim of circumstance" due to his association with the Pendergast Machine, and that he is otherwise "intelligent [and] industrious" and will "be able to rehabilitate himself." Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Record of court commitment for Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, which records his offense, sentence, and his ultimate parole in 1941. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Prison record of Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, which includes sentencing dates and terms and notes his conditional release on May 30, 1940. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Memorandum from the Leavenworth Penitentiary's record clerk regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, communicating the order from the U.S. District Court to turn Pendergast over to his probation officer upon his discharge from the penitentiary on May 30, 1940. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from C. H. Waring, Chief Medical Officer of the U.S. Public Health Service, to N. R. Timmons, parole officer, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Waring recommends that, due to Pendergast's poor health, the Board of Parole interview him in his hospital ward at Leavenworth Penitentiary, and specifically notes his numerous recent heart attacks, including one just a few weeks prior. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

FBI report on Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, listing charges against him and sentence he received. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Clay C. Rogers regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Rogers writes that "the good which flowed from [Higgins'] activities far overbalance any wrong which he committed," and alludes to Tom Pendergast serving a lighter sentence for a worse crime. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.