Harry S. Truman Library and Museum

Displaying 85 - 96 of 364
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Continental in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his visit with Tom Pendergast in New York, saying that he "... had a most pleasant visit with T. J. P. He [Pendergast] was as pleased to see me as a ten-year-old kid to see his lost pal."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this particularly candid letter, Truman updates Bess on the politics of Missouri and the nation, saying that "Pendergast hasn't made up his mind yet who will be governor. He'll announce it sometime soon. If the man is smart and politically minded he can say who Clark's successor will be and can deliver the 1940 delegation at the national convention."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides insight on his public speaking, saying that, "You also know it's a chore for me to write a speech and I won't let anybody else do it. You remember Harvey would be so mad at me in the campaign because I wouldn't say what he wrote"

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen informs Truman he just saw Truman's good friend P. C. Carlock. Kitchen asks Truman to do what it takes to appoint Carlock to his desired position as sub-carrier at Greenfield, Missouri.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his endeavor to select the new Kansas City W.P.A. Director and then comments about those affiliated with the Pendergast machine: "Mr. [Matthew S.] Murray, Mr. [Henry F.] McElroy, Mr. [Otto P.] Higgins, and even Mr. [Tom] P. himself probably would pay all the ill-gotten loot they took for my position and clear conscience."

Genre: 
Broadsides

One-sided anti-Klu Klux Klan broadside written by O. J. Gilmore of Kansas City, Missouri. Gilmore provides an excerpt of a statement by Kansas Governor Henry Justin Allen and an account from the Saturday Evening Post that detail the racism and violence exhibited by the KKK. Gilmore then includes an excerpt of Congressman E. C. Ellis, Republican candidate for Congress, in which Ellis aligns himself with the views of the KKK.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Independence, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this letter, Truman informs Bess that he met up with Lee C. "Doc" Johnson, then spent the following day, "…trying to make a budget. It will require the discharge of some two hundred and two employees…"

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman thanks Kitchen for his intelligence and analysis on current state politics in Missouri.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to Aviation Commissioner of the Kansas City Chamber of Commerce Russell Cantwell. Truman thanks Cantwell for sending him "a copy of a letter to the Secretary of War about the safety of air plants."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Photocopy of a letter from President Harry S. Truman to James M. Pendergast in Kansas City. After learning that James had sided in opinion with one of Truman's political adversaries, Truman sends a heated letter, mentioning that he never thought it to "be necessary for me to ask a Pendergast to make a choice between an upstart little Rabbit and the President of the United States." Truman ends the letter saying, "[Roger] Slaughter is obnoxious to me and you must make your choice." The Harry S. Truman Library and Museum does not hold the original document.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at The Majestic in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. Written while Truman was attending the 1936 Democratic National Convention, Truman comments on several small details concerning the convention, including the fact that "Mrs. [Bennett C.] Clark was there and sat with the delegation--quite a concession as she had a box seat on the stage. I was given one for you but gave it to T.J. [Tom Pendergast]."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Dodge City, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his campaign for a National Old Trails Road and State Highway for Kansas.

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