United States Board of Parole

Displaying 1 - 12 of 55
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Louis G. Loschke, assistant cashier at City National Bank & Trust Company, regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Loschke writes that he is Higgins' brother-in-law, and attests the positive assets of his sister and her husband, and his intentions to live a good citizen. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Monsignor M. D. Tierney of Annunciation Parish regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Monisgnor Tierney believes Higgins resolves to lead a better life, and writes that as his pastor, "it is natural that I should plead for one of my flock and most especially for one who has strayed from the fold." Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Parole Officer Assembly Sheet for Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, listing the reports required in each case, including history of correspondence, admission summary, disciplinary actions, and other information. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Kansas City, Kansas, postermaster A. H. Gillis regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Gillis writes that he has known Higgins since boyhood and that he will "make a comeback to citizenship" if paroled, and that his family has been "victims of untold suffering and humiliation" for his first offense. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ray G. Cowan, Circuit Court judge, regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Cowan writes that he and Higgins were law students together, and attests to the character of his wife and family, and his belief that Higgins will "once again become a useful citizen." Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Monthly supervision reports, conducted by Lewis J. Grout, Probation Officer, for Tom Pendergast upon his release from the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth. The reports for the months of July, August, and September, include his residence, his return to work as president of Ready-Mixed Concrete, his wages and expenses, and other remarks. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from attorney J. Frank Flynn regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Flynn writes that he has known Higgins since they were law school students, and states that he "associated with respectable people and had a good reputation." Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from G. M. Burns, director of the Kansas City Safety Council, regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Burns writes of Higgins' good work as director of the police department, particularly noting his achievements in greater traffic safety, increased training for officers, and reducing juvenile delinquency. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Agreement between R. P. Lyons, vice president of Ready Mixed Concrete Company, and the United States Board of Parole, stating that Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, will be employed "steadily in the occupation of President" of Ready Mixed Concrete upon his parole, and agreeing to report to U.S. Probation Officer Lewis Grout should Pendergast's work become unsatisfactory. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Sol Sporn, president of Gelhaar Uniform Company, regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Sporn writes that he knows Higgins to be "a fine, up-standing citizen in every respect," and says he will "again be the fine citizen that he was before this misfortune occurred." Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from attorney Alexander D. Saper regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Saper writes that he practiced law with Higgins between 1922 and 1934, and believes he was a "clear victim of circumstance" due to his association with the Pendergast Machine, and that he is otherwise "intelligent [and] industrious" and will "be able to rehabilitate himself." Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Notice of release for Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, registering the details of his release from the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth on May 30, 1940. The report writes that Pendergast was taken into custody by Lewis J. Grout, United States Probation Officer, and asks that attention be given to Pendergast's medical report. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.