Roosevelt, Franklin D.

Displaying 61 - 72 of 80
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from George G. Vest, attorney and counselor at law, to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on May 10, 1932. Vest comments that Thomas J. Pendergast's personal physician, Dr. D. M. Nigro, would speak with Pendergast on Vest's behalf. He also discusses Franklin D. Roosevelt's Presidential primary campaign.

Genre: 
Transcriptions

Press release containing the test of a statement given by William Hirth, publisher of the Missouri Farmer and president of the Missouri Farmers' Association, regarding the state Democratic convention. Hirth reports that the recent "convention in St. Louis was the most shameful gathering of its kind in the history of Missouri," and describes animosity between Clark-Pendergast forces and Governor Lloyd C. Stark.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Mrs. T. W. Marr to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on May 16, 1934, with attached letter. Marr urges Mitchell to combat the corruption in Kansas City and comments how she was turned down for a job in Marshall, Missouri because she did not have Thomas J. Pendergast's endorsement.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Barney E. Reilly to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on November 8, 1932. Reilly expresses his desire to position himself for one of Franklin D. Roosevelt's administration appointments. He requests Mitchell's help in securing one and proposes methods at acquiring influence from acquaintances for it.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ewing C. Bland to his uncle, Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on January 20, 1936. In Bland's lengthy response, he explains how the public views Bland and Mitchell to be connected politically, and how Mitchell consistently jeopardizes Bland by attacking the Kansas City organization for Mitchell's own political gain. Because of Bland's diminished political standing and Mitchell's public connection with Marie Plummer, it would be impossible to leverage for her reinstatement without being charged with nepotism.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Frederick E. Whitten to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on March 19, 1940. Whitten responds to William Hirth's suggestion that he run for office in the 1940 election.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Western Union telegram from Governor Guy Park of Missouri to President Franklin Roosevelt recommending the release of funds for Missouri River improvement due to the "unemployment situation."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Frederick E. Whitten to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 21, 1935. Despite talk in Kansas City of Thomas J. Pendergast's power in Washington D.C., Whitten praises Mitchell for his stance against Pendergast's influence. He comments, "Socialism, Bossism, and gang control have no part in Democratic or American Government, and those of us who have a true concern and regard for the history and accomplishments of the Democratic party cannot help but look with alarm to the future of the party."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter signed "Executive Secretary" to Hon. Drew Pearson, regarding the Missouri delegation to the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. The letter says that, despite the efforts of the "anti-Roosevelt forces, headed by Missouri's Senior Senator" Bennett Clark and the Pendergast machine, the Missouri delegation to the convention "will be guided ... by a strongly worded resolution praising President Roosevelt's leadership," favored by Governor Stark.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Jim Huron to Governor Lloyd C. Stark prior to his election as Missouri governor, recommending rest before the upcoming strenuous gubernatorial campaign, and predicting a political career leading to bigger things than governor.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from C. J. Hitchcock to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on March 22, 1934. Hitchcock praises Mitchell for his public attack on Thomas J. Pendergast and discusses unemployment among trained railroad men.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Governor Lloyd C. Stark to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, inviting Roosevelt to stop to speak at the State Capitol during a trip west. Stark writes that Roosevelt's "fine record and splendid help in aiding us in our local housecleaning is appreciated by every decent Missourian - certainly more than 90% of them."

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.